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JanetP

Living with the D. How do you juggle things?

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JanetP

Tossing this one out for discussion:

 

A diagnosis of diabetes and the effort to make dietary and lifestyle changes in order to get it under control can be all-consuming.  Many of us have other things going on in our lives besides the D.  And learning new habits is not easy.

 

So how do you manage to juggle everything?  Do you make compromises?  If so, what and how?

 

How do you set your priorities? Especially when work, family, and other health issues complicate things?

 

To quote my granny:  "You can't have your cake and eat it too."  So, what gives?  Giving up carbs is obvious, increasing exercise is obvious.  LC cooking can require a lot more time in the kitchen, so can the amount of exercise needed.  So what do you let slide, if anything?  And how do you manage it?

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Bishop

In my case, I've found that two things work well for me, given my schedule and a chronic "lack of time" perception:

  1. Life happens, shoot happens, just need to get over myself and accept that I cannot plan everything or stick to a schedule all the time, just prioritize and move on.  I'm not communicating this well, but it's a mindset that helps me tremendously and I know you'll never guess given my posts on this forum, but it seems to work well for me in terms of stress and relaxation.  Sometimes too well.  =)  I also more recently (last 5 years) have been adopting and really believing in a mantra tied to "don't be proud of being busy" - there's actually a lot of psychology behind that, but in short, it helps me with perspective and with separating work from non-work, and prioritization.
  2. I find that I get back some time when skipping meals.  In my case, it does wonders for my blood sugar, saves time with all of the testing I do with every meal, and obviously saves time with food preparation, cleaning, etc.  Not to mention, allows me to skip my post meal walks and such.

 

These are 1% miniscule things, but they work for me (high profile work, life, kids, infants, etc. - the usual juggling many of you have already gone through or are going through now).  In other folks I manage or observe, I'd add a 3rd one which is tied to not caring about what others think.  Far easier said than done, and (in my opinion) impossible for some, but I think a worthy way to live one's life.

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Seagal

It seems anytime there is a health issue, many things slide around our house even though dh takes care of everything for me.  Now that I am walking again and able to do a lot more, I notice things.

 

I definitely think anything that limits us temporarily or long term can do a mental job on us.  Perhaps we can juggle everything a lot easier when we feel better? 

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Fraser

Fortunately I am single, adult daughter, no other health issues and when I was working I controlled my own schedule.

the biggest thing for me was taking Thursday as mine. Did not mean I did not work, just that mi clients knew tthey could.leave messages

And I would get back to them. I learned to low Thursday I could sleep in, go to them gym, actually go to the gym, and had a quiet day to get things done. I just found I needed that break. And work on the weekend was optional.

 

On food I followed the Suckerberg black shirt principle. I heard he wears the same style of outfit each day ( they get washed) so he doesn't waste time and energy buying different outfits and deciding what to wear. I reduced my food choices to simple low carb meals.

With simple verifations, much easier to shop, just filled up the fridge and had easy meals available. Out for lunch, and had to do fast food,

I had a short list of what and where I could it.

 

The biggest one was retirement. I am fortunate to be able retire. So when I hit Medicare and had guaranteed insurance. I sold the condo, the car and most of my belongings., modified my retirement expectations and headed to California for good weather and my daughter.

I found a rent controlled apartment and joined the gym. Found a trainer and joined a running group.

 

Diabetes was a big wake up call. It was time for me to be number one and my "job" was to be as healthy as I could.

Best decision I ever made.

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Kit

This is a hard one to answer because I don't really see how its a problem in the first place.

 

Cooking doesn't take me any longer now than it did prior to diagnosis.  I am the queen of quick and tasty meals that play well with my BG.  I think it helps that I managed to kick the mindset that required bread/grains/starches as a core component of a meal.  Meat, fat, and low carb veggies cooks rather quickly for the most part.  Usually in one skillet.  Less time, less dishes to wash.  :)

 

The only problems I've run across, once I figured out my diet, have been other people.  People who never cared about what I did or did not eat are now frantic about the idea that I have to eat fruit and grains and seem to do everything they can to get them past my lips.  Well those who know I don't eat fruits and grains.  I haven't told many.  Those who I have not told, don't seem to notice any change at all.  :)

 

As for family, I am married.  I have no kids.  I work full time.  Mr Fuzzy can carry his own weight.  If he wants something that I haven't cooked, he can cook it himself.  He's a big boy and this isn't the 1950s.

 

I am quite selfish of my time, but then I always have been, so this isn't anything new.

 

Exercise is the only thing that really seems to have changed for me.  I have so little free time and it now eats into most of it.  The only time I sit down that's not while I'm at work or driving is the 20 minutes I make myself sit down and eat.  That does get a little wearing at times.  Sitting down is overrated anyway.  :)

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Peggy_TX

My D dx was easy.    And almost fun (some of you will relate to that)

I felt SO much better with the change in eating.   Had fun with the "science experiment" of eating to my meter

Had tons of energy and motivation to get back to excercise

Had great readings for a couple years

 

And then other stuff piled on

My mother needs more time/attention -- even with help that comes in, someone needs to manage the help   And the house maintenance.  Etc etc.   I seem to average about 10-20 hours/week just on making sure her needs are taken care of.

 

And then I started feeling worse.   Glucose control became harder, even with the same food.    I've had no energy, foggy memory, and all-over pain.   Pain in my thumbs so bad that I sometimes can't lift my coffee.   Thrilled to learn that there is a good chance we've finally gotten to the root of the problem, and may have easy fix (parathyroid may need removal).      But i've had a hard time fitting in "me" when everything I do has been so unrewarding....  no energy for exercise, good food choices haven't made me feel better, etc)

 

Did I answer the question???   These days, I seem to forget what I'm saying from the start to the end of a sentence.....

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samuraiguy

For me it starts with setting goals so I know what to focus on and what to eliminate because everything either helps or hinders me from reaching my goals.

 

"Would you tell me, please, which way I ought to go from here?”
“That depends a good deal on where you want to get to,” said the Cat.
“I don’t much care where–” said Alice.
“Then it doesn’t matter which way you go,” said the Cat.

 

-- Alice's Adventures in Wonderland

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Kalisiin

Hummm...I have several advantages that most people here probably don't...so I don't find I need to juggle anything, really.

 

Being as I own my own company, and work from home...I answer to no-one, and I punch nobody's clock.  As long as the work gets done and meets the deadlines of my clients, they could care less WHEN I do it.  So I get to schedule this around other areas of my life.

 

I am not married, and I have no kids.  So I have nobody else to consider...except my mom...who actually LIKES eating as I eat now...she is losing weight too, and she likes it.

 

I have a relatively stress-free existence, and I have been able to remove much of the stress in my life, which certainly also helps my BG numbers.

 

This is not something that many here can probably do, since they probably DO punch someone else's clock, and have other people to answer to and to consider..

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Kalisiin

Fortunately I am single, adult daughter, no other health issues and when I was working I controlled my own schedule.

the biggest thing for me was taking Thursday as mine. Did not mean I did not work, just that mi clients knew tthey could.leave messages

And I would get back to them. I learned to low Thursday I could sleep in, go to them gym, actually go to the gym, and had a quiet day to get things done. I just found I needed that break. And work on the weekend was optional.

 

On food I followed the Suckerberg black shirt principle. I heard he wears the same style of outfit each day ( they get washed) so he doesn't waste time and energy buying different outfits and deciding what to wear. I reduced my food choices to simple low carb meals.

With simple verifations, much easier to shop, just filled up the fridge and had easy meals available. Out for lunch, and had to do fast food,

I had a short list of what and where I could it.

 

The biggest one was retirement. I am fortunate to be able retire. So when I hit Medicare and had guaranteed insurance. I sold the condo, the car and most of my belongings., modified my retirement expectations and headed to California for good weather and my daughter.

I found a rent controlled apartment and joined the gym. Found a trainer and joined a running group.

 

Diabetes was a big wake up call. It was time for me to be number one and my "job" was to be as healthy as I could.

Best decision I ever made.

Fraser, you and I seem kindred spirits in many regards.  I, too, keep my wardrobe simple...why do I need a bunch of stuff when I mostly work from home, anyway?

 

And my clients ALL know that my morning walk time is ALL MINE.  They do not call me before noon.  EVER.  And if they have a true emergency, they text me, and THAT I will respond to immediately.

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comedy

I have to confess that I took the diagnosis on as a challenging project and went straight to a diabetes forum to start the research. What I found there was that people were doing really well after years and years of eating lots of saturated fat, which my body had always loved, but I'd felt guilty about for years. So I embraced LCHF with delight.

 

My weight loss started straight away, my gastric reflux disappeared overnight, and as usual with a new challenging project, I found everything about it intensely interesting. So I bored the pants of a few people until someone told me and I stopped that. But I had the diabetes forum where everyone was still interested, and so was my doctor, because she could see the results not only in my BGs and appearance, but also in my lipids and other blood tests. 

 

My job had become toxic, and the diagnosis/project actually gave me the courage to quit and change other things in my life.

 

Four years later I have very good control over my diabetes, and while I enjoy visiting forums and reading to keep up-to-date, my diabetes really only affects me while I'm actually reading and participating in forums. My fridge and food cupboard have only low-carb-friendly ingredients, and I have found ways to eat out with no dramas, so life basically goes on and I'm healthy and happy. And a lot lighter, too, which is a major plus. :)

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ScoobySteve

I have always been pretty active so exercise wasn't an issue.  Well, it was in that I have toned it down a bit and run further, slower.  Too much strenuous exercise can raise sugar.  I suppose the biggest challenge is finding food when I am on the road.  Subway salads are pretty good, but good luck with breakfast if it is fast food.  I sure miss mexican food though.  LOL

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Kalisiin

I have always been pretty active so exercise wasn't an issue.  Well, it was in that I have toned it down a bit and run further, slower.  Too much strenuous exercise can raise sugar.  I suppose the biggest challenge is finding food when I am on the road.  Subway salads are pretty good, but good luck with breakfast if it is fast food.  I sure miss mexican food though.  LOL

This is why I split my exercise up into three times a day...and why I usually do moderate intensity stuff like walking.

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comedy

I have always been pretty active so exercise wasn't an issue.  Well, it was in that I have toned it down a bit and run further, slower.  Too much strenuous exercise can raise sugar.  I suppose the biggest challenge is finding food when I am on the road.  Subway salads are pretty good, but good luck with breakfast if it is fast food.  I sure miss mexican food though.  LOL

There's a 24 hour Maccas (McDonalds) around the corner from where I live, and you can get a bacon and egg muffin without the muffin and orange plastic cheese if you go into the shop instead of the drive through. They'll do it in a bowl, I believe (I've never tried it, because it's cheaper for me to just go home (900 metres)).

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Peggy_TX

 I suppose the biggest challenge is finding food when I am on the road.  Subway salads are pretty good, but good luck with breakfast if it is fast food.  I sure miss mexican food though.  LOL

 

that one's easy

I get a double order of scrambled eggs at McDs.   If you aren't veggie, I'd suggest you get it with a side of bacon.

problem solved.    :)

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gotsomeold

Not only am I controlling BG via diet, I am also allergic to several very common foods.  When I drive, I carry a small cooler.  Worst case is stopping at a grocery to buy packaged meat and cheese - which can last me for days.  Best case is stopping at a diner and having an amazing salad.  When I fly, I carry nuts and cheese since airline food and I really do not get along.  In restaurants I hand the server a card I print showing what I can and cannot eat.  So far, in thousands of miles traveled, there were only two places we had to leave because there was literally nothing I could eat.

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Kalisiin

And my clients ALL know that my morning walk time is ALL MINE.  They do not call me before noon.  EVER.  And if they have a true emergency, they text me, and THAT I will respond to immediately.

I should note, incidentally...that my clients are all doctors.  And they know my situation.  They know my morning walk time is something I am doing for my health, and so they respect that.

 

They also know if they have a true emergency, they can text and I will respond immediately.  If I am out on the walk, chances are I cannot help much, since I don't have access to the billing program...but I can find out what is up...and get on it the second I get home...or, if an extreme emergency (very very rare) I will head home immediately...deal with it...and then go back out on walk.

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Kalisiin

Not only am I controlling BG via diet, I am also allergic to several very common foods.  When I drive, I carry a small cooler.  Worst case is stopping at a grocery to buy packaged meat and cheese - which can last me for days.  Best case is stopping at a diner and having an amazing salad.  When I fly, I carry nuts and cheese since airline food and I really do not get along.  In restaurants I hand the server a card I print showing what I can and cannot eat.  So far, in thousands of miles traveled, there were only two places we had to leave because there was literally nothing I could eat.

That is a really slick idea, I like it!

 

I never fly...if I can't walk, drive or take a boat, I am not going.  I used to fly all the time.  9/11 changed that for me FOREVER.  I have flown twice since then, and both times it was absolutely unavoidable...and I had heart palpitations so bad I decided I just was never getting on a plane again.  It has been thirteen years since I have been on one.

I am surprised to learn that the airlines will let you being on your own food and drink...EVEN THOUGH you are diabetic and have food allergies.  I don't think I have EVER seen American airports cooperate with anyone about ANYTHING that goes against their little rules...I have seen mothers who use pumps be forced to leave their own milk behind!

 

So how do you manage this?

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Moonpie

as far as I know, the restrictions are on fluids, so you cannot bring on a bottle of water but you can bring nuts, hb eggs, jerky, cheese sticks, etc on board. You can bring an empty water bottle & fill it up at the water fountain, past security.

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Kalisiin

as far as I know, the restrictions are on fluids, so you cannot bring on a bottle of water but you can bring nuts, hb eggs, jerky, cheese sticks, etc on board. You can bring an empty water bottle & fill it up at the water fountain, past security.

Not sure why that makes sense.

I can think of a thousand innocuous items that could be used as a weapon if someone really wanted to cause a problem.

 

I am of the belief that all this "security" is just an illusion of security, designed to make Americans FEEL safe...while in fact making them not even an ounce safer.  Hence my refusal to fly.  When the Americans take lessons from the Israelis, I might reconsider.  American airline security is a joke a hassle and an indignity that imparts no extra safety whatsoever.

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Bishop

Not sure why that makes sense.

I can think of a thousand innocuous items that could be used as a weapon if someone really wanted to cause a problem.

 

I am of the belief that all this "security" is just an illusion of security, designed to make Americans FEEL safe...while in fact making them not even an ounce safer.  Hence my refusal to fly.  When the Americans take lessons from the Israelis, I might reconsider.  American airline security is a joke a hassle and an indignity that imparts no extra safety whatsoever.

 

I think most of what you said has already been documented, studied, published - so your instincts are correct.  Security is no better that it used to be (mostly because we're comparing against such a low baseline that any "improvement" is questionable - one of the semantics of small numbers) - though I have read about one exception - tied to passengers now being more active/proactive.  I.e. given the common knowledge of what has happened, folks are less likely to sit around and let a plane go down without a fight.

 

I fly quite a lot and used to fly even more often.  Have sat next to folks I'm sure were marshalls.  Think from time to time what I'd do if Person X was a hostile, have been fascinated with the efficiency of a padded/weighted knuckle and hitting the button and knocking someone out (and why that's so much more difficult in real life) and do feel that others who travel often and see a lot share the same thinking around passenger engagement on the hijacking front.  Attention when it comes to safety procedures, sadly, no improvement there.  =)

 

You're spot on about the Israelis too - near perfection relative to our game, but a fundamentally different situation and mindset.  And in some cases, the physical aspects of the aircraft are different (superior).

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gotsomeold

The nuts & cheese sticks are in my carry on.  The cheese sticks are individually wrapped by the manufacturer.  But the nuts are just in a baggie.  Every time I fly, I do wonder if this is the time my snacks get confiscated.  But so far no one has questioned them.

 

I travel to many countries.  Before I go I print my cards (business card stock) one side English and the other side in the dominant language of the country I am visiting. 

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Kalisiin

I think most of what you said has already been documented, studied, published - so your instincts are correct.  Security is no better that it used to be (mostly because we're comparing against such a low baseline that any "improvement" is questionable - one of the semantics of small numbers) - though I have read about one exception - tied to passengers now being more active/proactive.  I.e. given the common knowledge of what has happened, folks are less likely to sit around and let a plane go down without a fight.

 

I fly quite a lot and used to fly even more often.  Have sat next to folks I'm sure were marshalls.  Think from time to time what I'd do if Person X was a hostile, have been fascinated with the efficiency of a padded/weighted knuckle and hitting the button and knocking someone out (and why that's so much more difficult in real life) and do feel that others who travel often and see a lot share the same thinking around passenger engagement on the hijacking front.  Attention when it comes to safety procedures, sadly, no improvement there.  =)

 

You're spot on about the Israelis too - near perfection relative to our game, but a fundamentally different situation and mindset.  And in some cases, the physical aspects of the aircraft are different (superior).

Oh, I agree.  There will never be another 9/11 style hijacking, simply because passengers will no longer be docile and passive, hoping to be freed once the plane has been taken to the hijackers destination.  They know all too well, they, too, could get flown into the side of a building.

 

I used to work, years ago, as a DOC auditor. (Department Of Customs) - in my case, I was part of a team that inspected packages coming in from overseas via UPS and the like.  We actually used to, as an exercise, sit around and think up ways we would smuggle contraband into the United States.  The idea being to keep us sharp and on the lookout.  Because the sad truth is...as good as my team was...we really only were able to truly inspect one in about a hundred packages.  The difference being that we singled out packages that tripped certain wires, if you catch my meaning.

 

And this is precisely what our TSA agents OUGHT to be doing and aren't.  Instead, they have their stupid rulebook, and turn travel into a hassle and an indignity to everyone...and actually impart no additional safety whatsoever.  I guess we are simply too gutless to actually PROFILE travelers...the way we PROFILED packages that got the full monty, as it were.

 

And, yeah, I know I am spot on on the Israelis..we actually took many points from the Israelis in our own jobs...the Israelis knew darn well what to look for!  I'll go for a fundamentally different mindset for the Isrealis, but I would argue our situation is every bit as dire as theirs ever was...if not even more so...because the Israelis, at least KNEW EXACTLY who their enemy might be, and what they might do.  I would argue we have a whole new ballgame now, and the Israelis are still the best at it.

 

At any rate, I have absolutely zero confidence in our TSA agency, I believe they are bureaucratic rule-followers...even when the rules make no sense, and I believe they simply are not adequate to the job they have been given.  This is no diss of the TSA agents, they have a tough job.  But we have so tied their hands in this country, that they really are not able to do the kind of job that needs to be done.

 

And we are now MASSIVELY off-topic, lol.

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Kalisiin

The nuts & cheese sticks are in my carry on.  The cheese sticks are individually wrapped by the manufacturer.  But the nuts are just in a baggie.  Every time I fly, I do wonder if this is the time my snacks get confiscated.  But so far no one has questioned them.

 

I travel to many countries.  Before I go I print my cards (business card stock) one side English and the other side in the dominant language of the country I am visiting. 

Now that is a very good idea.

When I visited Thailand, about twelve years ago...I went for three weeks of immersion in touring the old Buddhist temples and palaces...it was a marvelous trip.  I met an online friend in Bangkok, who was from Singapore, and she was fluent in both Thai and English.  It made my trip much smoother.  Carmen, my friend, also provided me with some flash cards with common phrases on them, one side in English, one side in Thai, in case we became separated, and I needed help.

We shared a hotel room for the three weeks I was in Thailand.  But we were not always together every day.  There were days where she decided to do something different than I was doing, or vice-versa.  The flash cards really made the difference a fair number of times.  In Bangkok, most people speak enough English (sometimes broken) that one could get by without the cards, if you were good with gestures...but outside of Bangkok was a whole 'nother story!

 

By the way...that trip was twenty seven hours on three different planes.  It was one of the two plane trips I have made since 9/11.  the other was a trip from Texas (where I lived at the time) to Cincinnati...for a friend's wedding.

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