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Barry6547

Hunger

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Jody

^^ Reminds me of a friend who was worried about the sugar in the list of ingredients for BACON.  Even though it had ZERO carbs.  Dose makes the poison.

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stevenal
Jody, on 10 Dec 2015 - 08:07 AM, said:

I realize that.  But the CARBS per serving is the important part, and http://www.adamspeanutbutter.com/product your brand is same total carbs :P

Something suspicious about the math there. 1+2=6? In any case, it's not the total carbs per serving that counts; it's the net carbs consumed and the effect they have on your meter reads. Serving sizes are not always realistic, and are likely to vary from product to product. And while there is some debate on how to count fiber (and net carbs), I think there is agreement that a gram of fiber does not have the effect of a gram of sugar or starch. Instead of consuming 2 T pb, I eat 1 T pb plus 1 T butter. (6-4)*0.5=1. Maybe 2 since I poured off some of the peanut oil before mixing.

 

I avoid added sugars and starches wherever I can (without giving up bacon of course.) Zero per serving where added sugar is present usually means the stated serving size is low enough that rounding down makes zero.

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Tilda

This may not work for you BG wise, but I eat 30oz of stir fried vegetables a day, in plenty of olive oil, to go with my protein. Obviously only low carb veggies. I'm mostly between 100 and 110. I also make my own delicious crackers (pumpkin, sesame, flax, chia seeds), and chocolate pudding: cocoa powder, chia seeds, hempseed, home made pecan milk, and erithrytol. Also a huge bowl of mixed salad. I need to eat 5 meals/day to not be hungry, but this works. Maybe that would do the trick for you anyway: eat more of what you already eat, just spread out across the day in more meals. Not always doable, of course.

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Jody

Something suspicious about the math there. 1+2=6? In any case, it's not the total carbs per serving that counts; it's the net carbs consumed and the effect they have on your meter reads. Serving sizes are not always realistic, and are likely to vary from product to product. And while there is some debate on how to count fiber (and net carbs), I think there is agreement that a gram of fiber does not have the effect of a gram of sugar or starch. Instead of consuming 2 T pb, I eat 1 T pb plus 1 T butter. (6-4)*0.5=1. Maybe 2 since I poured off some of the peanut oil before mixing.

 

I avoid added sugars and starches wherever I can (without giving up bacon of course.) Zero per serving where added sugar is present usually means the stated serving size is low enough that rounding down makes zero.

Yeah, I definitely avoid them where I can, but I just don't assume that because something has "some" sugar in it, that it's enough to matter.  The peanut butter is one thing - I LOVE the taste of Skippy.  Sue me!  I do! :)  And if it had 5 extra carbs for that sugar, I'd get over it and switch to something else.  But the fact is, it's comparable to all the other natural peanut butters, so what's the point in switching?  (That's a rhetorical question)

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Kalisiin

Being Pre-D, I try to keep my intake of carbs low, which = high fat as well.  A typical breakfast might be eggs and bacon or eggs and sausage... that's pretty much the breakfast fare.  My low carb lunches may be:  hamburger steak or grilled chicken breast, a basic lettuce salad, and two vegetable servings such as mustard greens and cabbage, or turnip greens and broccoli.  The above listed meals keep my bg levels below 100 or at the most a couple of points above.  The problem is that 2 hours later I'm hungry.  So this presents two issues:  Why am I hungry only two hours after meals and what snacks might satiate the hunger, keeping in mind that with the low carb meals mentioned my postprandials are fine?  

 

Any suggestions on what I might change in my meals to keep the bg numbers low, but also satisfy the hunger for longer than a couple of hours?  And what snacks might really be filling while not increasing bg levels?

Go nuts.

 

Cheese, nuts and yogurt are my staples now.  They keep me satiated a long time.  Try adding one of those to your meals...maybe replace something else with it.

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Aggie

I don't know what I can add here. My usual snacks are:  nuts (macadamia nuts are the best, carb wise.  Walnuts, almonds and pecans are good.  I like pistachios but I don't think those are super low carb.  Cashews and peanuts are technically not nuts, they are legumes and although their carb count is not awful, it's not great.), 85% dark chocolate, cheese, and my mousse (recipe here in the pre diabetes section).  Peanut butter is OK as long as it is the natural type you describe.  I have pork rinds, but rather rarely.  

 

I agree with the others that you need to add fat to meals.  Add butter to the veggies.  Eat avocado if you like it.  Add cheese to things.  Cook things in olive oil.  Make use of heavy cream.   Not only will this stave off hunger, but fat does not make blood glucose rise AT ALL  while protein actually does, just not as much as carbs.

 

If your portion sizes are small, or if you are eating mostly veggies, that could be an issue.  Switch things around so that you are mostly eating the main course and that the veggies are a smaller side dish.

 

Am wondering why dairy causes you intestinal issues.  Are you lactose intolerant?  Hard cheeses shouldn't be an issue even if you ARE lactose intolerant, but if that is the problem, taking the enzyme supplement Lactaid ought to fix it.

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Kalisiin

As a Southerners here, pecans are usually my nut of choice, because I can get them dirt cheap here.  I also like walnuts, pistachios, almonds, brazil nuts...yummm

 

I like macadamias, too, but they are godawful expensive!

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ronmesnard

kayell, thanks for the warning I usually do that but I must have forgotten.  You also start with small portion size which I did mention. I assumed you would test the small portion size before you increased your portion but did not state that. It is also very important to carefully read my suggestion.  I didn't suggest to anyone eat rice.  I specified an exact type of rice grown in an exact location.  GIs for rice range from 30 to 130.  Canned kidney beans have a GI of 40.  Table sugar is 70.  There are many types of rice that are nearly twice as damaging to your body as pure table sugar.  There are lots of rices that are near 130.  Most are above 100.  Good rice is hard to find and you need to read the labels.   It is the chemistry of the rice that makes all the difference.  BTW food with significant levels of resistant starch will not calculate properly in carb counters.  It has calories but does not add to your BG but actually helps post meal BGs.   They may not even register the same calories.  Test tube digestion that more closely replicates human digestion will show less calories than a more efficient process. 

 

These and resistant sugars found in legumes like beans and vegetables in the cabbage family like broccoli slow the digestion of the starches in your food.  Your BG spikes become BG hills.  BG spikes above 140 are not considered dangerous by anyone.   There is great disagreement as to what is a safe spike and 140 is the lowest of these values.  The longer your BGs stay elevated the longer you stay satisfied.  

 

I will add fats and fiber slow the digestion of carbs and are your friends.  I wouldn't worry about the carb count in nuts.  They are loaded with fat slowing the adsorption of the carbs and greatly increase the calories.  The high calories forces you to keep these snacks small or you will blow up like a balloon.  Fat in food is your friend but fat on your body is one of your worst enemies. Fat sucks up insulin that your body can't make enough of.  

 

If you are lactose intolerant there are cheeses that are made without cow milk.  They have no lactose or very little and hard cheese made from cow's milk doesn't have much lactose. 

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leosmith

This might seem counterintuitive, or maybe just plain ridiculous, but have you tried fasting? I'm not talking about reducing your daily caloric intake; I just mean eating within an 8 hour window every day. Since I started doing this, I haven't had the ravenous hunger that used to hit me an hour or two after a meal. I also think reducing the number of meals helped. I used to eat multiple (5 or 6) small meals per day, spread over about 14 or 15 hours. Then I change to 2 meals in 8 hours, and my problems went away. One year later, after I got my preD badge, I decided to go to 3 meals to allow me to safely eat more carbs. But if it weren't for the preD, I'd still be eating 2 meals per day. Here'a related article:

 

http://www.marksdailyapple.com/fasting-weight-loss/#axzz3vBsZv0x4

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Forester

This might seem counterintuitive, or maybe just plain ridiculous, but have you tried fasting? I'm not talking about reducing your daily caloric intake; I just mean eating within an 8 hour window every day. Since I started doing this, I haven't had the ravenous hunger that used to hit me an hour or two after a meal. I also think reducing the number of meals helped. I used to eat multiple (5 or 6) small meals per day, spread over about 14 or 15 hours. Then I change to 2 meals in 8 hours, and my problems went away. One year later, after I got my preD badge, I decided to go to 3 meals to allow me to safely eat more carbs. But if it weren't for the preD, I'd still be eating 2 meals per day. Here'a related article:

 

http://www.marksdailyapple.com/fasting-weight-loss/#axzz3vBsZv0x4

 

This is what I do also.  Basically I do not eat breakfast, and restrict eating to lunch and dinner, with a cut-off of 8pm, so it's a 16/8 intermittent fast schedule.  Combined with a nutritional ketogenic VLCHF diet, I can keep my BGs low (usually less than 100) and rarely feel hungry.  For snacks after lunch and dinner, I have a few almonds, walnuts, a beef stick (I like Duke's "Shorty" smoked sausages) or various hard cheeses.

 

Here's a good primer series on how this works, if anyone is interested:

 

http://www.dietdoctor.com/member/courses/fung-fasting#1

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Barry6547

As far as the "fasting" aspect, I certainly eat well within an 8 hr. period.  I eat breakfast around 7:30 a.m.  If I have sausage and eggs I am normally hungry again by 10 a.m.  With bacon instead of sausage, I may last until 11 a.m.  I eat an early lunch and am hungry again within several hours.  I could not last all morning without breakfast...I have always had a ravenous appetite.  I think the need for more fat may be very well be  my main problem as mentioned by others.  I just hope current medical thought is wrong that eating a lot of red meat=  increased cancer risk as I could be the poster child for heavy meat consumption.  

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