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leosmith

There's more to good nutrition than "just follow your meter"

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leosmith

There's more to good nutrition than "just follow your meter". 

 

Do you agree or disagree with this statement, and why?

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Bishop

There's more to good nutrition than "just follow your meter". 

 

Do you agree or disagree with this statement, and why?

 

It's an obvious truth analogous to "there's more to good nutrition than your blood glucose values" - I don't think it has to be more profound, dramatic, or complicated than that.

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NoraWI

There's more to good nutrition than "just follow your meter"? Maybe for a non-diabetic but NOT for those with diabetes... both T1 as well as T2.

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samuraiguy

As far as what you eat to allow you to keep healthier BG levels?  I would agree that should be addressed, i.e. Someone with a CVD family history and high LDL levels may want to be mindful of what fats they eat on their LCHF diet.  If you are still gaining weight despite eating to your meter and your insulin resistance increases because of that then I would say you still need to be mindful of your caloric intake.

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jwags

I think all diabwtics are so different so we could all eat the same healthy meal and get very different I ate extremely healthy before diabetes but my meter was very high. Also most D's only test 1-2 times a day and your bgs may be going high at different times.

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Peggy_TX

There's more to good nutrition than "just follow your meter". 

 

Do you agree or disagree with this statement, and why?

 

Well, taken literally, it's absurd

I'm certain you could eat a diet that would keep your glucose within a good range and still cause scurvy or rickets or any number of things if you were ridiculous about your food choices

We've had people on this board who insisted they would never ever ever touch any vegetable EVER.   which I suppose is fine, if one supplements with appropriate vitamins and minerals, but will clearly lead to problems if you don't.

 

It's an odd questions.   Why do you pose it?

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moneymeister

Follow your meter to narrow down your food choices (it will eliminate the potatoes and rice) but knowing what you shouldn't eat doesn't negate making sure you have a rounded diet. We need a balance of colorful low carb plants for vitamins and a wide variety of proteins. I suppose we take for granted the person who is on a forum will be smart enough to know they cannot live on water and cold cuts and be healthy. Maybe we shouldn't.

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Joisey

Thats what makes this so much fun. It's the fine line between good BG control (that's what "follow your meter" is for), and good nutrition (which is a different animal but somewhat related). We each have to make our own choices to negotiate this balancing act. What I do is set upper limits for BG readings. I try not to go over 150 but for something I consider super nutritious, I'll let it spike to 180 or so as long as its under 150 at two hours. For example Blueberry Yogurt.

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leosmith

It's an odd questions.   Why do you pose it?

I like information; I generally like to gather what I consider to be sufficient information in order to make informed decisions. That's why I find it interesting there are so many reply posts on this forum of the form "you're over thinking this, just follow your meter". The way I read it, the OPs are generally just trying to gather information, and telling them to stop thinking isn't helpful. I used to think the "just follow your meter" crowd was angry or getting defensive because it didn't know the answer or something. But now I'm really wondering - does it think there's no more to good nutrition than following it's meters? 

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leosmith

I suppose we take for granted the person who is on a forum will be smart enough to know they cannot live on water and cold cuts and be healthy. Maybe we shouldn't.

Very good point. Plus, I'm running out of cold cuts.

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Peggy_TX

. But now I'm really wondering - does it think there's no more to good nutrition than following it's meters? 

 when most of us say "don't overthink -- eat to your meter" we are saying "each carb is not going to effect each person identically.  don't waste time trying to figure out why one person and eat something with different effect than another.    and don't go crazy counting each food and thinking carb count is the only thing that will impact your glucose.   use good judgement, and then test and see what works for you"

 

Never once did I presume that telling someone to "eat to their meter" needed to come with a cautionary clause that this does not give you a pass to eat raw chicken that has sat in your hot car all day.    *sigh*

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TX_Clint

What if it's a live chicken that sat in your hot car all day? Never mind the chicken doodle! Wow, I'm really, really bored today!

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Moonpie

a varied diet is important, vary the proteins & veg, I would not consider a steak every night  & no other proteins to be sufficiently nutritious, or to eat only one veg every day.

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