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ali

Just got diagnosed type 2 diabetes at age 22, I have some questions

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ali

Hi guys so i just got diagnosed a couple days back and to be honest this feels like I'm living a nightmare. Ive always loved food and perhaps that over indulgance has caused this disease for me. I didn't think i would get diabetes since I am slim and I do a lot of cardio like 5 hrs a day. Regardless now I have it and I guess I have some questions. If I eat healthy and continue to exercise regularly will I be able to live a normal life or am I to expect new issues like kidney failure and amputations ( I read that somewhere ). Also can I still eat from fast foods or should I banish myself from them. Currently my prescription is 2 500mg tablets of metaformin a day. 

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Uff Da

Sorry to hear about the diagnosis. That hits a lot of us hard. You'll find a lot of help here, though, from people who have learned to live with diabetes and keep problems under control.

 

May I ask how you know you have type 2 and not type 1? Did the doctor do any specific tests, or did he/she just assume it was type 2?

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adiantum

Hi Ali, please relax & dont allow this to overwhelm you.

This forum is all about care, support , & recommendations & we welcome you with warmth & sincerity.

 

Firstly, no one deserves nor brought this onto themselves. Secondly, I wonder if you are really type 2  at your age  & body structure.

What we have been led to believe is eating healthy is probably the worst path we took. Now we realise fruit, bread, rice pasta etc are toxic to our blood glucose readings.

 

Taking control of diabetes will  keep us in good health 99% of the time.

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ali

Thanks for the response everyone. I just came back from a 30min run right after eating because I didn't want my sugar to go up. Like 3 weeks ago I started seeing things blurry. I could not focus on objects that well past 4 meters or so. Then about 2 weeks ago I started to get really thirsty all of the sudden and I had to urinate very frequently. I googles these symptoms and one of them mentioned a possibility of diabetes. Since my dad has it I figured Id check my blood sugar from his monitor and it was at 500 mg or 27mmol. I googled that and it I was alarmed when people said to go to the ER immediately since it could be life threatening. I did and after a blood test and a urine test the doctor said I had type 2 diabetes.

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adiantum

Can you buy a meter for yourself?

What country are you in as there are several options for economical meters & test strips.

In the US  walmart seem to have cheap meters & strips.

If you go to your GP , ask them to test  you for type 1.

In the meantime avoid high carb foods unless you go very low & then orange juice  should pick you up

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samuraiguy

Welcome to the forums. I would ask to have a second opinion. It is not unheard of to be under age 40, slim, athletic and get type 2 diabetes, but rare--by CDC statistics 95% of newly diagnosed type 2 diabetics share three traits 1) Overweight, 2) Inactive and 3) are over the age of 40. For you to have BG levels so high you sound more like a type 1 diabetic as most type 2 diabetics get to the frequent urination and thirst stage after years and even more than a decade of prediabetes.

 

In any event, I can tell you from experience that it is possible to manage your diet, exercise and use medications to keep your blood glucose levels in a healthy range and greatly lessen your risk of complications.

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meyery2k

Ali - Welcome to the forums.  22 does sound young for T2.  I would pursue that since the methods of control are markedly different for T1 vs. T2.

 

For now though, what you might find helpful is to start cutting back on sugars, potatoes, rice, bread, pasta, and fruit.  It might be difficult to do this at once so cut back and find foods that you can replace them with.  Protein is converted to glucose more slowly so those are generally OK if you don't overindulge.  Fat does not really convert to glucose and can also slow glucose uptake so you can use those to help develop meals that satiate you.

 

I think you will find most fast food is not compatible with good glucose control.

 

Exercise helps and it sounds like you have that covered.

 

Diabetes is a long term disorder and it is very likely major complications will not occur if it is kept controlled.  First priority is to get a meter and strips that you can afford so you can test after eating and determine which foods you can handle.  AFTER you get your BG to a good level you can experiment with small amounts of carbohydrates and see which foods are not good for you to eat.  You may find you can handle a small quantity of potato, for example, but rice sends you spiking.

 

In general non-root vegetables, eggs, cheese, butter, and meats are foods you can start looking into to build a diet to help you maintain good BG.  There are a lot of wonderful recipes and you can easily find substitutes for most of the old favorites. 

 

If you are T2 it will take some time to get your BG down using Metformin.  My fasting BG was 291 the first morning I tested after diagnosis and it took about 6 weeks to get to where I was consistently around 100 or less.

 

Did they give you an A1C?  This gives you an idea of what your average BG level has been over the last 90 days.  

 

There is a lot to learn but you have time to do so and we will help you.  Don't get dismayed.  There are a lot of diabetics that manage and thrive in spite of it.

 

Lastly, there can literally be thousands of reasons for someone to be diabetic.  Diabetes is a clinical term referring to elevated glucose levels in the blood like cancer is a clinical description of an uncontrolled growth of cells.  Glucose control is a complicated system involving the pancreas, brain, liver, peptides, hormones, and other factors.  Apparently there are many ways it can be broken.  My doctor told me there are over a thousand genetic switches that control this and there are many forums here that can give more information.  It wasn't any type of overindulgence on your part.  The elevated glucose is merely a symptom of the process that is really going on.

 

Mike

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ali

Can you buy a meter for yourself?

What country are you in as there are several options for economical meters & test strips.

In the US  walmart seem to have cheap meters & strips.

If you go to your GP , ask them to test  you for type 1.

In the meantime avoid high carb foods unless you go very low & then orange juice  should pick you up

 

I have got a meter from the doctor my dads insurance covers it so thats not much of an issue thank fully. I have been checking it before breakfast and dinner for the past week.

 

Welcome to the forums. I would ask to have a second opinion. It is not unheard of to be under age 40, slim, athletic and get type 2 diabetes, but rare--by CDC statistics 95% of newly diagnosed type 2 diabetics share three traits 1) Overweight, 2) Inactive and 3) are over the age of 40. For you to have BG levels so high you sound more like a type 1 diabetic as most type 2 diabetics get to the frequent urination and thirst stage after years and even more than a decade of prediabetes.

 

In any event, I can tell you from experience that it is possible to manage your diet, exercise and use medications to keep your blood glucose levels in a healthy range and greatly lessen your risk of complications.

 

Thanks, I agree with you, I found it odd to have type 2 diabetes as well. I was kinda hoping it was a one time spike or something, I have an appointment tomorrow and i will ask for a second opinion. 

 

Ali - Welcome to the forums.  22 does sound young for T2.  I would pursue that since the methods of control are markedly different for T1 vs. T2.

 

For now though, what you might find helpful is to start cutting back on sugars, potatoes, rice, bread, pasta, and fruit.  It might be difficult to do this at once so cut back and find foods that you can replace them with.  Protein is converted to glucose more slowly so those are generally OK if you don't overindulge.  Fat does not really convert to glucose and can also slow glucose uptake so you can use those to help develop meals that satiate you.

 

I think you will find most fast food is not compatible with good glucose control.

 

Exercise helps and it sounds like you have that covered.

 

Diabetes is a long term disorder and it is very likely major complications will not occur if it is kept controlled.  First priority is to get a meter and strips that you can afford so you can test after eating and determine which foods you can handle.  AFTER you get your BG to a good level you can experiment with small amounts of carbohydrates and see which foods are not good for you to eat.  You may find you can handle a small quantity of potato, for example, but rice sends you spiking.

 

In general non-root vegetables, eggs, cheese, butter, and meats are foods you can start looking into to build a diet to help you maintain good BG.  There are a lot of wonderful recipes and you can easily find substitutes for most of the old favorites. 

 

If you are T2 it will take some time to get your BG down using Metformin.  My fasting BG was 291 the first morning I tested after diagnosis and it took about 6 weeks to get to where I was consistently around 100 or less.

 

Did they give you an A1C?  This gives you an idea of what your average BG level has been over the last 90 days.  

 

There is a lot to learn but you have time to do so and we will help you.  Don't get dismayed.  There are a lot of diabetics that manage and thrive in spite of it.

 

Lastly, there can literally be thousands of reasons for someone to be diabetic.  Diabetes is a clinical term referring to elevated glucose levels in the blood like cancer is a clinical description of an uncontrolled growth of cells.  Glucose control is a complicated system involving the pancreas, brain, liver, peptides, hormones, and other factors.  Apparently there are many ways it can be broken.  My doctor told me there are over a thousand genetic switches that control this and there are many forums here that can give more information.  It wasn't any type of overindulgence on your part.  The elevated glucose is merely a symptom of the process that is really going on.

 

Mike

 

Thanks for your super long answer! It was very helpful and I'm great that you and everyone else would take so much time to give me some answers. I don't know about the AC1, they might have since they gave me a paper with a bunch of number on it so I'm guessing its on it. Im just wondering isn't type 1 diabetes worse since you have to inject insulin, Im hoping i don't have that even though it does make more sense. 

Anyways thanks everyone for your quick comforting and informative replies. I should head to sleep since I've had a messed up sleep schedule for years now and I should try to fix that. 

All the best, Ali

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TrishaB

Hello and a big WELCOME to the forum, sorry about your diognosis, you have how ever come to the rigth place for advice and help....:)

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NoraWI

Welcome to DF, Ali, and, NO, Type 1 diabetes is NOT harder to control. Yes, you have to use insulin and give yourself "shots," but modern technology has developed insulin syringes, pens and pumps that are totally painless to use. Your finger poke for testing BG hurts more than an insulin shot. Ask for a referral to an endochrinologist who specializes in diabetes. Among tests that can confirm T1 are a GAD65 antibody and a c-peptide. There are additional antibody tests. A diabetes diagnosis no longer means blindness and amputations IF the diabetes is kept in good control. You sound like an intelligent and proactive person and I am sure that control will come easily to you once you get the correct diagnosis and learn how to maintain good blood sugars. I would say that with your exercise program you are half way there.

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JohnSchroeder

It is shocking news to be sure Ali, but like others have said, with effort it is easily controllable which can delay or eliminate any potential side effects.

 

As others have said, go to an endocrinologist to confirm whether you have Type 1 or Type 2.  ASAP.  A BG of 500 seems to me higher than even a typical undiagnosed T2 is likely to see.  But a T1 who makes NO insulin, its possible.

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jwags

I agree with the others go to an ENDO and get the full antibody panel including a GAD 65 test and a c-peptide test. Type 2 usually develops slowly over years. There are thin Type 2 like myself but it is rare. Most thin, active people are probably type 1 or type 1.5. Are you on insulin, now?

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ali

So I made an appointment to figure out if I really am intact type 2. In the mean time how ever I feel like I kind of have this thing under control. Before meals my blood sugar is usually 100mg and after meals it goes to like 160 max at times. I eat once at 10 am with 500mg of metaformin and i eat another big meal at 4 without any medicine and lastly I eat at 9 with 500mg of metaformin. Yesterday I wanted to see if I could still eat from fast food restaurants like i used too so first I played a 2hr intense game of basketball at 2pm and then i ate the full mean (3 large pieces of chicken and a biscuit). I checked my blood sugar shortly after when i got home and it was 110mg which surprised me since i thought it might shoot up. I feel like if i continue to stay active i can eat the types of foods i used to enjoy except sweet stuff. I would like to ask if this is something i can do or should i change my diet and only eat super healthy stuff since maybe these foods may be affecting me in a way that is not noticeable from my blood sugar readings. Thanks!

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Kit

It depends on what you mean as healthy meals.  :)

 

But seriously, it really depends on whether or not you are Type 1.  if you are, no amount of physical activity, or healthy lifestyle, or anything else will make any difference.  Your immune system is attacking your pancreas, destroying its ability to produce insulin.  You will eventually have to go on insulin.

 

If you are Type 2, then that's another subject.  Its quite possible to control with lifestyle and diet choices, especially early on in the process.

 

For this next little bit, I'm going to assume you are type 2 (though I agree with the others that think type 1 is more likely and I'm happy you are getting tested).

 

Type 2 is an inability to make use of the insulin your body produces, often referred to insulin resistance.  Now when you eat carbohydrates (which are in just about everything), even healthy ones, it gets turned into glucose by your body's digestive system and goes into your blood stream.  It is the job of insulin to get that glucose out of your blood and into your body's cells so it can be used.  For an insulin resistant type 2 diabetic, this is where the system has broken down.  The glucose stays in the blood, the levels rise to dangerous levels.

 

Exercise can help a type 2 uptake more glucose into your muscles.  It can also help drop any additional body weight (though it doesn't sound like you have any there).  But, one of the biggest lifestyle changes you can make is diet.  If you don't consume excess carbohydrates, it can't raise your blood glucose levels.

 

Now for your meal choice.  Unless it was breaded (likely it was), there's nothing wrong with chicken.  Breading will add carbohydrates.  The biscuit, lots of carbs in there.  I'm assuming it was made with white flour, which means lot of fast carbohydrates.  I personally couldn't eat breaded fried chicken and a biscuit without jumping up pretty high.

 

BTW - protein can also have an affect on blood sugar.  meal composition can as well.  I'm not going to go into those details here.

 

A lot of us here eat what would be considered unhealthy scorned upon diets.  We skip grains and starches for vegetables and fats.  Which is the reason I asked on what you meant by healthy diet.  A healthy breakfast of steal cut oatmeal (plain with nothing added) will toss my blood sugar way up.  A couple of fried eggs cooked in butter with sauteed mushrooms and spinach (one of my favorite breakfasts) won't.

 

But really, confirm what you are first.

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MariaGordon

It is dreadful news to be sure Ali, but like others have said, with try it is easily controllable which can delay or eliminate any possible side effects.

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