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Ella.Boo.Bella

Just Diagnosed with Pre-Diabetes

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Ella.Boo.Bella

My doctor diagnosed me yesterday (labs, etc) with Pre-diabetes.  She's giving me the injectable medication "Trulicity."  It wasn't her first choice, but I can't take the pills because of the diarrhea risk... and I have GI issues.  She didn't say anything about checking my BS or anything, and today I'm wondering if I need to do that while Pre-Diabetic and using this medication?  I'm not sure I'll hear back from them today or not.  I'm not using the first dose until my husband can be here at home with me, so that will be Sunday (a couple of days from now).

 

Does anyone else use this stuff, and do you use a BS monitor?

 

Thanks in advance.

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TX_Clint

BS meter is a must. Oh,, and welcome to the forums. Not testing is like using autopilot in a Tesla and not paying attention to where you are going.

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Kit

I have no experience with Trulicity, so I can't help you there.

 

I agree.  I would grab a meter with inexpensive strips and test on your own.  Its unfair to expect a patient to make any progress on a condition with no way of knowing how they are doing on that progress.  I sometimes suspect doctors like their patients to be blind, deaf, and dumb.

 

Many of us here follow the eat to your meter rule.  Test before a meal and at least 2 hours afterwards.  This not only lets you know your base line, but also how much a particular meal may raise your blood sugar.  That way you can adjust your meals to be kinder on your blood sugar readings.

 

And since you were not given a meter, you were likely not given target goals to work towards.  The big goal is to keep your A1C under 6.0.  By keeping your 2 hour post numbers under 120, you will at the least get close to that target.

 

There are a lot of diabetics in my family with complications (including a brother who is blind and on dialysis) so I tend to be stricter with my personal goal.

I want to be under 100 (preferably in the 80s) before meals and when fasting.  I also prefer to be back down to my pre reading level by 2 hours.  It not back to my base, I at least like to be back under 100 by that 2 hour mark.  "Normal" A1C ranges are, at least according to my lab, 4.0 - 5.6.  My personal goal is to be within that range.

 

Good luck, feel free to ask any questions you may have

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meyery2k

Welcome!  Diabetes is a clinical description of elevated glucose levels in the blood.  Like cancer, there can be many different reasons for being diabetic.  Testing lets you see which foods you should avoid.

 

What you may want to try out is a low carb diet for several days, check your morning level before eating (know as a fasting level) and log it.  This will help tell you what your baseline is.  If you see the numbers trending down, continue with the low carb until there is a stable set of numbers.

 

You can then start testing with small amounts of things like berries, beans, and root vegetables.  You may find that many of these have little effect if eaten in small portions.  You might also find some foods that cannot be consumed without a spike.  For example, bread of any kind sends me over 140.  I won't go over 120 with 1 cup of potatoes.  I still mostly avoid foods that have a lot of carbs on a day to day basis but I will have potato once in a while because I know it does not have to negative of an effect on me.

 

Treat fruit as candy.  Sugar is sugar whether natural or not.  It is converted to glucose very quickly and your goal is to give your body as little glucose as possible to deal with. 

 

Try and avoid rice, potatoes, pasta, root vegetables, and fruit.  Above ground vegetables like squash, zucchini, cauliflower, broccoli, and kale are filling.  There are many delicious recipes that utilize these.

 

Many here, myself included, have used a low carb high fat diet with great success.  I do not eat "low fat" because there is usually carbohydrate added to make it taste good or have the right texture.  I am obese and, with this diet, I have lost 70 pounds since January.  If I eat the right foods I stay full between meals.

 

I would encourage you to join the post where we share our morning BG readings.  I find it helps keep me accountable to myself and the friends I have made here.

 

You have an opportunity to possibly not become diabetic and we would all love to help you with that goal in mind.  This is a marathon, not a sprint, and it is important to track long term trends vs day to day numbers.

 

I hope you decide to join our community.  I was diagnosed as a type 2 in January and the advice and support provided on this forum has helped me to manage my diabetes so well that the doctor is saying I should consider not taking my Metformin anymore.  It can be done.  For me, I had to unlearn some common thinking, reach out in the faith that the experience of others would guide me, and learn to adapt. ~ Mike

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adiantum

Hi Ella, Welcome to the forum.

 

Having a meter & keeping your blood glucose under control is even more important then visiting a doctor.

Many companies give free meters although its best to find the cheaper test strips. I believe Walmart or Amazon can be of use.

Instructions for use will be with the meter.

Reducing your intake of carbs could also  address your IBS

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Kit

After I had my gall bladder removed in the late 90s I had horrible horrible constant diarrhea.  I mean seriously bad.  Many times a day.  For 15 years.  Pain, cramps, nausea, emergency runs to the bathroom, sometimes multiple times an hour.

 

And then I was diagnosed diabetic.  Once I started metformin and went lchf, it went away.  Completely and totally.

 

But, I no longer eat any grains what so ever.  No wheat, barley, corn, oats, or similar.  I eat very little fruit, the occasional berries.  And no root vegetables with the exception of onions and radishes, which are treated more as seasonings and so very small volumes.

 

My total carb intake is around 30g a day and it all comes from lower carb vegetables.

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samuraiguy

Welcome to the forums. What helped me to get to and maintain the BG levels I want was to set some goals (A1C, fasting, 1 and 2 hour post meal) and then, along with exercise and medication if needed, either eliminate, lower the portion size of, or find a non-carby alternative to any food that put me out of my goal range.

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Orlando

Hi Ella and welcome to the forum. Start reading as much as you can and ask plenty of questions. Google "Blood sugar 101" plenty of excellent information there. In the beginning its a lot to absorb, new words and concepts to take on board, but that soon settles down. I was diagnosed as pre-diabetic about 3.5 years ago and am lucky enough to be able to manage without any medications. Stay motivated and the rest will follow. I wish you all the best. 

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Bar&In

Sorry to hear OP but far worse things. Diabetes is actually pretty easy to manage if one educates his/herself and puts forth minimal effort; majority of the time it's like it's not even present. Good Luck!

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Ela

Hi Ella Bella and welcome to the forum!

 

I agree with all posters above about importance of testing and benefits of low carb/high fat diet.  Eating to your meter is most important for managing your condition and yes, as Adiantum put it: it's MORE important than visiting your doctor.

 

I'm not familiar with Trulicity, but quick search tells me that it's a VERY new drug, that is only was approved 2 years ago.  Red flag for me as it's not thoroughly researched yet. Also right on their site they state that it may cause Severe stomach problems...among many other unpleasant things. 

 

I'm curious: what are your blood sugar numbers that cause the diagnosis?   A1C? Fasting blood sugar?

 

All in all I'd switch things around and rather wouldn't take medication, but get the meter first and try to manage with diet and exercise.  Many "pre"diabetics and also full blown Type 2 diabetics are able to manage their condition successfully without any drugs.  And since you are only "pre" - I think it might be possible for you too. 

 

Good luck and hugs!

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Barry6547

I, too, like Ela would be interested to know what blood tests were run and what those numbers were.  I may be wrong, but think most people are not placed on a drug for pre diabetes.  I guess if your numbers were right on the borderline, that might be one reason why you were.  I was diagnosed as prediabetic several years ago.  My doctor only suggested I pay attention to the glycemic index and continue to exercise...and that was about it.  I had to take the initiative, purchase a meter and begin testing.

 

At first I tested a lot....upon rising in the morning...then one hr. after breakfast...and  the second hr. as well.  I did the same thing with lunch and dinner.  And frequently when I was several hrs. between meals I would test a little bit of a a particular food and see what effect it had.  Now, I am a follower of the low carb high fat regimen.  As has been mentioned by others, eat to your meter....it can give a lot of meaningful information on how to eat well without skyrocketing your blood sugar...and with determination you may be able to not transition to diabetes and may even be able to back away from those prediabetic readings. As they say, knowledge is power.  Good luck!

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