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Kittyluvr400

Is this odd?

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Kittyluvr400

My mom developed type 2 later in life. Once in a while I would check my bs, just out of curiosity. I was weighing in at about 250 lbs. I'd wake up with an average of high 120's. I mentioned it to my endo, who never looked into my bs. Once mentioned, he decided I need weight loss surgery. He jumped right to surgery without even telling me to try dieting. Instead I went on a diet to prove I can do it. I have not had luck sticking to a diet, hense the now 266 lbs. but this time I meant business to avoid any talk of surgery. I have lost 35 lbs since Jan 6, 2016. Strangely, my bs is even higher now. I wake up now to a bs of 180 or more. I would have thought 35 lbs gone would have helped lower it, instead it's getting higher. My mom developed type 2 in her 70's, but I am only 55. I see my endo (hypo thy, did RAI about 13 yrs ago) in 3 months and I will show an even larger weight loss by then. He has me journaling my bs once a week. You would think losing 35 lbs should've helped. My exercise level is not great, as I have chronic sciatica due to damaged nerves in my spine. In order to help me move around a bit, I put in a huge flower bed that takes me two hours or more a day to maintain its beauty. That has helped me lose some weight due to working in the garden as well.

 

Strange how my bs is worsening after losing 35 lbs. So now I am challenged to beat theses numbers even more. Any input here? Losing 35 lbs and bs going up?

 

TIA

Rose

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Cora

While there can be a correlation between weight and IR (insulin resistance), it's not true for everyone. There are skinny, athletic people who get type 2, so losing weight is not a guarantee  that your bg will go down. Check out the forum Rose, and look for low carb (and yummy) foods to eat, up your exercise, and then see what happens. The bottom line with diabetes (or pretty much anything, for that matter) is that you try your best and then see what comes.

 

It is possible that despite the weight loss, you might need some meds if your bgs don't stabilize. Remember, this is not your fault! Type 2 has a very strong genetic determination and while carrying a bit of extra weight might have triggered it a bit earlier for you, the odds are that at some point, you would have had bg (blood glucose) problems. I know a 400 pound man who has perfect blood sugars. Go figure. Just work hard, try to take care of yourself, and do the best you can.

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Peggy_TX

I think it's worth asking -- what's your new diet?

You mention that you've been dieting to lose weight -- but not what you are now eating, and how it differs from what you had been eating

A lot of "lo cal" food options are lower in fat -- and HIGHER in carbs!

 

What does your daily diet look like now, and how does it compare to what you were eating when your glucose levels were lower?

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dowling gram

Who ever told you gardening is not exercise. Just because it's not done in a gym does not mean it's not exercise. Any action that gets you moving is exercise. In summer gardening is my exercise and I figure I get as much exercise as someone going to a gym.

 

Diets never work. Sooner or later you go back to eating the way you've always done. What you need is a lifestyle change. I suggest you start eating low carb/high fat and make it a habit. Pick a way of eating that you can stick with long term. It may be hard at first but a few months in you'll find that those cravings for carby food have gone. Search our recipe section and look for low carb recipes on line. I can't imagine eating any other way now

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samuraiguy

Genetics and age (being over 40) can be sufficient for many to develop type 2 diabetes. As others have mentioned once you are already insulin resistant then the two other factors of diet and exercise are your best ways to deal with it if you don't take medication. If the 180 mg/dl is a fasting number, I am surprised your Endo hasn't labeled you diabetic and taken proper action to address you as such. In any event use your meter as a guide to what you can eat. Set some blood glucose goals and either eliminate, limit the portion size or find a low carb alternative to any food that puts you over your goal levels. For example, if you want to keep your A1C under 6, then you would need to have a fasting under 100 mg/dl, a 1 hour after meal reading of less than 140 mg/dl, and 2 hour post meal under 120 mg/dl. If you can't hit your goal levels with diet and exercise alone talk to your Endo about possibly adding medication.

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jwags

I was dx'd at 56 with no family history of diabetes. I was a little heavy, 146 pound but not by much. Mostly it was leftover weight from 6 pregnancies. I am now 110 pounds. I am now 110 pound, the weight I was in HS. Guess what I am still diabetic and struggle with bgs especially when I eat carbs. Exercise is good for weight loss, but choice of food is even more improtant. When I was dx'd almost 10 years ago I was working out in the gym or tennis courts 2-4 hours a day plus gardening and house work. So exercise did not delay a Diabetes DX for me.

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Kit

All I can really do is second what others have.  Fasting readings of 180 is way into the diabetic range and I am shocked your doctor seems to be ignoring it.

 

Also, I also second taking a look at your diet.  Carbohydrates, no matter how "healthy", will raise your blood sugar.

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Kittyluvr400

The weight loss has been mostly portion control. My main meal is a salad, with the protein or carbs as a side dish. I eat fruit as a main snack. For dieting, it has worked...but IMO, the fruit is a bad choice of snack if I am watching my bs. (at least that is what I am reading, as if I should have no fruit at all) I obviously have to watch the carbs in my fruit and veggies, which I never bothered to do. It's working for losing weight, but I guess not for lower bs levels.

 

My endo is an idiot. He is totally old school and has his way of doing things. For yrs I go in once a yr with my weight getting higher and higher and he never once checked my sugar. I finally had to approach him about it. His response was weight loss surgery. That's it. So now he sees me every four months to keep tabs on the bs. I don't bother with a new endo as my insurance doesn't cover any in my area and I pay out of pocket. So starting all over could mean seeing the new dr more often in the beginning.

 

This mornings fasting number was 183. I'm about to eat lunch ( I generally don't eat breakfast) and I am 171. I'll check two hrs later. Lunch will be potatoes and eggs, maybe 1/2 potato, slice of spam and a tablespoon of corned beef hash.

 

I will be doing a lot of reading here, trying to learn new ways. I see my diet should be low carb, high fat. I will come up with a different way of eating now. Guessing that daily salad, which has helped the weight loss, may be a bad thing to eat. Plus my fruit. Usually strawberries or a banana, and peaches now while they are in season.

 

Thanks for your replies and I will do research to find out what should be done differently.

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Kit

When approaching a low carb diet, the idea is to spend your carb budget wisely.

 

There's nothing wrong with a salad.  Salad greens and the like are very low carb and generally not an issue.

Pay attention to the dressings you are using.  They can pack quite a carb punch, especially if they are low fat.  I personally like making my own vinaigrettes.  But for bottled I generally lean towards Ranch (not the low fat).

 

Potatoes can, however, be quite an issue as they are chock full of starches.

 

http://www.dietdoctor.com/low-carb/vegetables

 

This is a nice page showing the different levels of carbs in vegetables that can be useful starting out.

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Fraser

Sounds like it is time to totally redo your eating pattern and start over.

For me skipping breakfast raises my numbers, the liver kicks in, but we are all different.

I do best consistently eating simmiliar carb amounts each day at the same time.

That also means consuming the same type of carbs.

It may sound boring, but I think most people are pretty consistent with their eating pattern.

Fruit carbs would bounce my numbers all over the place.

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Peggy_TX

 I'm about to eat lunch ( I generally don't eat breakfast) and I am 171. I'll check two hrs later. Lunch will be potatoes and eggs, maybe 1/2 potato, slice of spam and a tablespoon of corned beef hash.

 

I will be doing a lot of reading here, trying to learn new ways. I see my diet should be low carb, high fat. I will come up with a different way of eating now. Guessing that daily salad, which has helped the weight loss, may be a bad thing to eat. Plus my fruit. Usually strawberries or a banana, and peaches now while they are in season.

 

Thanks for your replies and I will do research to find out what should be done differently.

 

I guess the GOOD news is that there is LOTS to change in your meal planning.

I know lots of people who are frustrated by high glucose readings, when their meals are seemingly low carb already

 

A couple suggestions (that have mostly already been mentioned)

Eat breakfast!    Eggs are a great protein.   Low carb AND low calorie.   Eat them , and start your metabolism in the right direction for the day

 

Potatoes?    High carbs, low nutrition.

 

Fruit is pure sugar.   Berries (strawberries and blueberries) are usually easier on blood sugar than other fruits.

 

With ALL foods -- eat to your meter.   People here can tell you what typically works for them, but not with certainty what works for YOU

Eat a food, then test at 2, 3 and 4 hours.     If your sugar stays unaffected, it's something you can probably eat.   If your sugar spikes, it's something you should avoid for now.

 

If you put your mind to it, you'll be fine

 

A friend of mine joined here about 3 months ago.    I think he only posted a couple times, but he read lots and lots of what people had said in the past.

His A1C is down from 10+ to 5.5.   And he has lost over 50 pounds.   Says he feels better than he can ever remember feeling.

That can be you in a couple months if you try!

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Moonpie

Buy a cheap meter & some strips, ( walmart maybe) & start testing your foods, as Peggy mentioned. Small amounts of fruit may be OK. If you can reduce your bgs, it is a good bet the weight will also go down. Good luck.

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Kittyluvr400

Well I have a lot to learn. Lowering the carbs should be just as successful for weight loss as my current diet. I don't even consider my diet A DIET. It has definitely been a change in eating habits. Now I need to be more selective with my choices. One snack was a lite yogurt and a banana. The yogurt is loading with sugar, and the banana was never a great choice of fruit anyway.

 

Mom's paperwork from her endo was being allowed 150 carbs a day. Seems like quite a bit. If that is a typical number of carbs, I think I can do that. I've already cut most bread out of my diet since January, so that is doable. I'll miss the fruit, as it was a tasty low calorie choice that helped with the weight loss. I'll learn. Lots to learn. Sigh. I know everyone is different, so I need to see how MY body handles the carbs I have a tendency to lean towards. The high fat freaks me out though. I do use a lite creamy dressing for salad. My last snack of the day is fat free, sugar free chocolate pudding with sugar free cool whip. Yum. Feels like a chocolate cream pie, minus the pie crust/sugar. I will look over my way of eating/diet. I will be reading these boards. And I do want my endo to take this more seriously and put me on a med to help me out. It took him 9 months to accept that I was hyperthyroid due to being overweight. He just refused to believe it. Finally nine months later he accepted it, and went straight for the kill...RAI. Never offered me other suggestions, so now I am on synthroid for the rest of my life. Same as he told me weight loss surgery. He never made an attempt to discuss losing the weight on my own.

 

I am always open to suggestions, so....suggest away!

TIA

Rose

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meyery2k

You situation has some similarity to mine.  I walked into the doctor's office.  I had not visited in a while.  I knew I was obese (313 lbs.), my BP was 180/110, my poor heart was racing at 140bpm, and I discovered I was diabetic.  I picked up my new meter and Rx, tested the next morning and my fasting BG was 291

 

I found this forum and adopted the advice you are reading.  It is good advice.  Many here have been where you are.

 

Now I weigh 230, my BP is often below 120/80 (over 90% of the time), my heart rate is around 50, and I usually have a fasting BG in the mid 80's.  I have not been over 100 in months.

 

As much as possible, eliminate flour, pasta, sugar, fruit, rice, and grains.  It is difficult at first and you may not feel well as you body adjusts to lower BG but you will get past that.  It may take 6-8 weeks to get your fasting BG consistently below 100.

 

Once you have your BG baselined, using your meter, you may find out that certain foods will have little effect on your BG while others should be avoided.  For example, I can eat a reasonable amount of potato but bread will elevate my BG higher than I would like.

 

As stated earlier, low fat food often has extra carbohydrates to provide taste and texture. 

 

I eat high quality proteins (beef, chicken, pork),eggs, bacon, and sausages.  I don't like to admit it but even the occasional Spam (I live in Hawaii and it is fantastically popular here).  Almonds, pistachios, and macadamia nuts provide energy and are filling.

 

To help fill me up I also eat a lot of kale, cauliflower, broccoli, zucchini, and leafy lettuce.  Root vegetables tend to have a lot of carbs so I eat a limited portion of those.

 

I cook with olive oil, butter, and use cream and cheese.  I eat well, lose weight and manage my diabetes.

 

Diet vs. lifestyle change - The race with diabetes is a marathon and not a sprint so the best thinking is to plan for the long run.  While I have received much good advice here, the one best piece of advice was to try and not "replace" foods with low-carb alternatives,  this will end in failure.  Rather, I was advised to find the new good foods that I liked and discover ways to prepare them so I would look forward to eating them.  Once I accepted this and adopted it for real, going LC was much easier and I stopped eating the foods I was resistant to giving up.  Basically carbohydrates=glucose so the less you can consume, the better.  Many here consume 50g of carbs a day or less.  Personally I try to stay around 40 or less.  Everyone is different, and like samuraiguy said, you would want to set targets that are good for you and that you can live with.

 

For example, when I was first figuring things out, I avoided potatoes.  I still do except for once in a great while.  I came across an idea to shred daikon (Japanese radish), wring out the water, and cook like a hash brown.  It is not the same as potato hash browns and, had I made this based on comparing to potato hash browns, this would have failed.

 

Instead, I like daikon and the recipe turned out great based on the merits of daikon.  I now look forward to this many days for breakfast.  While my family has bacon, eggs, and hash browns, I have my daikon and we are all happy.

 

I hope you will join our community.  You will find good advice, it is free, and it is selflessly given.  If you have a question, ask and it will be answered. ~ Mike

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meyery2k

Rose - It would appear you like desserts and sweets.  No problem :)

 

Courtesy of Kit, here is a chocolate mousse recipe to try.  My children love it and it doesn't last too long.  There are all kinds of LC, diabetic friendly recipes for cheesecakes, ice cream, muffins, etc.  If you are willing to be a little open minded and experiment, you will eat wonderful food.

 

I make better fried chicken, beef, or pork using almond flour than I ever did with white flour.  Yes, I have also had epic culinary disasters, but they make the wins that much better. 

 

8oz cream cheese
 2 cups heavy whipping cream
 1/4 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
 1tsp vanilla
 I used 4 packets of Splenda but I don't like things overly sweet so I would suggest using Splenda (or the equivalent) to taste
 
So cream cheese and vanilla in bowl and mix until the cream cheese smooths out a bit.  Add cocoa and sweetener and mix on low until all dry ingredients have been incorporated.  Add heavy whipping cream and continue mixing until its mixed together.  Then kick the mixer up to its highest setting and basically keep mixing until the entire thing gets stiff.  You can turn the bowl upside down and have none of it move.
 
You can then whip some heavy cream, vanilla extract, and sweetener to make a whipped topping.  While not low cal, it is low carb, and high taste!

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Kit

That mousse recipe does taste amazing but it does lead me into a conversation about sweeteners.

 

Not all sugar free sweeteners are the same.  Many of the powdered ones have filler in them to add bulk, make it measure the same as regular sugar, etc.  Those fillers can ended up giving you more barbs than you realize.

 

Now I personally don't eat a lot of sweet items so my experience is limited.  I personally prefer using the liquid sweeteners such as liquid Stevia or SF Davinci flavored syrups (uses splenda for sweetener).  From my testing neither of this has any effect on my blood sugar.

 

Some ways the recipe can be changed around.

 

Add in some instant espresso powder.

 

Drop the cocoa powder.  When whipping at the end, add in some lightly blended strawberries and sweeten with strawberry flavored sugar free syrup.

 

Add in lemon rind and some lemon juice for a lemon mousse

 

Toss some toasted nuts on top such as pecans (my personal favorite), sliced almonds, macadamia, or similar for a little crunch.

 

Its an easy recipe to modify to your taste.  :)

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