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Kittyluvr400

Testing high

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Kittyluvr400

I'm new to this and am considered pre diabetic. Just wondering if anyone feels physically differently when your numbers are high. Nausea, jittery, just feel like ick. I figure if a drop in sugar can make someone not feel well, do people notice when they spike as well?

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JohnSchroeder

Most definitely.  The most common symptom is fatigue.  I actually find it difficult to describe how I feel beyond that.  I can feel a difference in my eyes, and just in my body in general.

 

Nausea... if you are super high maybe.  Like 300 or 400+.  I don't personally relate to jittery when high, but I suppose some might.  Definitely ick.

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Kittyluvr400

I'm trying to figure out if it's the high heat right now that has me a bit off. I am noticing fatigue, but it could just be the sun and 90's outside. Wouldn't you feel fatigue due to lack of carbs? I was always led to believe low carbs can make you rather weak and tired.

 

I have so much to learn. It's fine researching diabetes online, but I always found forums to give me the 'real answers'...not articles written by doctors. I let the articles guide me, but I need to hear from those actually experiencing it.

 

My mom has diabetes brought on later in life. She does not check her sugar and although she knows it's bad for her, she tends to blow it off. This morning she had two slices of toast with butter and an hour later she was in the 250 bg range. I woke up this morning after the usual all night fast and I am again, in the 180's.

 

I also have a problem (problem for me) not eating a snack between meals. In order for me to get those accurate readings I have to refrain from eating anything between meals, since I need to check my meter.

 

I am successfully dieting, but not in a LCHF kind of way. Unfortunately, fruit is a big part of my diet. I don't feel deprived with fruit since it is filling. Now what do I do? This is now a whole new way of eating. Just how many carbs a day can I have? I know it depends on each person individually, but is there a place to start? 40 grams, 60 grams...I need to find my number.

 

I am bummed.

Rose

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NoraWI

I fall asleep when I'm high. Of course, that's preceded by fatigue. You can snack between meals as long as your snacks are low carb and not excessive in portion. Nuts are a good choice. They are filling and contain good fats. You do not need carbs to give you energy. As a matter of fact, there is no amount of carbs that is necessary to sustain life. Start by allowing yourself around 100g to 130g of carbohydrate per day. Then choose your carbs carefully for maximum nutrition. Include some protein. And then be sure to consume some good fats. They will fulfill your need for satiety. If you eat some avocado, nuts, butter or other food with good fats in them, then you won't get hungry between meals and need a snack. Think it out. Plan ahead. Get a goal. Then test, test, test for find out which foods don't raise your glucose levels much. Then you can start reducing the number of carbs to the lowest level where you are comfortable. Some here consume no more than 30g of CHO per day, maybe less, with just their food selection. It might seem like a lot of work, but you will gain a great reward in health and energy for life.

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Kit

I'm trying to figure out if it's the high heat right now that has me a bit off. I am noticing fatigue, but it could just be the sun and 90's outside. Wouldn't you feel fatigue due to lack of carbs? I was always led to believe low carbs can make you rather weak and tired.

 

I have so much to learn. It's fine researching diabetes online, but I always found forums to give me the 'real answers'...not articles written by doctors. I let the articles guide me, but I need to hear from those actually experiencing it.

 

My mom has diabetes brought on later in life. She does not check her sugar and although she knows it's bad for her, she tends to blow it off. This morning she had two slices of toast with butter and an hour later she was in the 250 bg range. I woke up this morning after the usual all night fast and I am again, in the 180's.

 

I also have a problem (problem for me) not eating a snack between meals. In order for me to get those accurate readings I have to refrain from eating anything between meals, since I need to check my meter.

 

I am successfully dieting, but not in a LCHF kind of way. Unfortunately, fruit is a big part of my diet. I don't feel deprived with fruit since it is filling. Now what do I do? This is now a whole new way of eating. Just how many carbs a day can I have? I know it depends on each person individually, but is there a place to start? 40 grams, 60 grams...I need to find my number.

 

I am bummed.

Rose

 

Look at not snacking between meals as a good thing.  Very few people out there have to meal so many times a day.  The rest of us just got used to snacking all the time.

Make sure the meals you do eat are filling and satisfying.

 

I recommend starting at around 100g of carbs a day.  Its still a generous amount, but still limited from the way over suggestion given by the ADA.  Give it some time there and see what happens to your numbers.  You may raise or lower from there, but it can give a good starting point.

 

Yes, glucose is an energy supply.  However, part of the point of a lchf diet is to switch the body from using glucose as its primary fuel source, to fat.  Being in ketosis gives you stamina, way more stamina that I ever had before.

 

Nora is correct:  Fats and Protein are quite filling.  One of my favorite breakfasts is a 2 egg scramble with mushrooms, peppers, spinach, and a splash of hwc.  That keeps me going easy for 6 hours before I start to feel hungry again.  If I know I am going to have a physically busy morning (like helping a friend move) I'll add a little cheese to it.  Cooked in butter, bacon fat, coconut oil, or even olive oil, lots of nice good fats for the body to use as fuel, along with the little extra protein which is helpful for the heavy lifting work.

 

However, you do NOT need to be in ketosis in order to take advantage of lchf.  There are some benefits you won't have, but your primary goal is to get your BG numbers back down to more normal levels.  The testing will help you find your sweet spot.

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meyery2k

Rose - I was dx'ed as a Type 2 diabetic in January and the advice here was precisely the same advice I was given.  My fasting reading are in the mid 80's on average, I have lost a significant amount of weight, and my BP is very well controlled now.  I feel great and always have the energy to do the things I need to do.

 

I had my favorite foods and argued tooth and nail over why I should be able to have those still, just less of them.  My friends here kindly suggested I eat to my meter (test, test, test...).  This quickly showed me why my arguments, though passionate, were unsound.

 

As you get your glucose under control, you may feel a bit unwell.  I remember my vision getting blurry which the doctor said was due to the glucose coming out of them which changes their shape temporarily.  The consensus here is that feeling unwell is a process of going through adjusting to lower glucose levels.  Your body is used to high glucose.

 

Through my own personal observation, I would soundly agree with trying to limit yourself to 100g of carbs a day.

 

As much as possible try to cut out fruit, pasta, bread, rice, corn, and root vegetables.  If you can't do it all at once it is OK.  I couldn't.  I needed flour tortillas to wean myself from bread.  As I saw improvement in my glucose I eventually cut them out after loudly proclaiming on this forum that I never would.

 

This is a marathon, not a sprint.  Make small changes that can be built into habits.  Hopefully you will see success which will encourage you to further fine tune your habits.  That worked for me.  Many small changes add up to a big change (which is, hopefully, lower BG readings).

 

Once you have your glucose under control you can experiment and will likely find some foods that you can eat in reasonable portions.  Many find berries to be fine.  I personally find this to be true but I have to watch the portion.  1/2 cup is no problem but 1 cup will send me near 140 which I don't like to do.  I can eat some potatoes but bread also send me on the glucose rocket.

 

Diabetes is different for everyone and you will find experiences unique to you.

 

We are here to help, keep up the questions!

 

You might also find it helpful to join and post in the area where we share out morning fasting readings.  When I first saw this I thought this was a crazy thing but I have found it keeps me accountable to myself and to the friends I have made here. ~ Mike

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Kittyluvr400

Thank you everybody. I like the idea of starting at 100 grams of carbs a day. It won't feel so overwhelming at first. I've always counted calories, so this is new territory here. I do love my proteins, but I rarely ate enough to fill me up without adding the carbs.

Thanks so much for the input.

 

My finger tips hurt from testing.

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