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happy_ira

Spouse support/question of pre-diabetic diagnosis...?

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happy_ira

Hi all. Wow, I'm still in shock so maybe this will help and some will have a suggestion or two of helpful advice.

 

My wife is 49 yrs old, mother of five kids, 5'2", approx. 120 lbs  and was just told by her doctor that she is pre-diabetic, so I have some questions perhaps someone here has some thoughts/helpful suggestions.  In addition to her basic stats noted above, she eats healthy (does not drink soda ever, does not eat tubs of ice cream, has an occasional piece of bread, nothing overdone, etc) and exercises via walks/jogs a couple miles 5x per week.

 

She went to her OB/GYN for a routine checkup a month ago, and in the course of reviewing her routine bloodwork results, her OB/GYN MD called her afterwards and said "... your routine results are fine except hemoglobin is high (?) and is an indication of pre-diabetes".  Naturally, my wife then made an appt with an endocrinologist and we are awaiting results from the bloodwork/test on that. The enodcrinolgist was a bit surprised that she was there owing to her relatively young age, good shape, diet, etc. Oh, also, the blood sugar level and all other key items in the first test was normal.  How/why is the high hemoglobin a potential indicator of pre-diabetes?

 

I've done some quick reading around the Internet to learn a bit more about pre-diabetes, what to do, what to eat (what not to eat), etc... Nothing jumps out that would make her pre-diabetic, so just a bit confused... though there are some easy things to "tighten the regins" on even more in terms of not even having a scoop of ice cream, etc. Absolutely zero in family history going back to her grandparents and a couple great-grandparents we know of (her maternal heritage, the women tend to have lived to 90-100 yrs old, with her great-grandmother living to 104).

 

Any thoughts/helpful comments until we get bloodwork back from endocrinologist? She has a follow-up appt with him in two weeks, and in the meantime is meeting with a nutritionist he recommended to talk about it.

 

Just confused. :huh:  Anyone?

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Seagal

It is premature to second guess since the bloodwork isn't  back yet.  Maybe the doctor meant her Hba1c was high?  Did you get copies of the labs?  Be sure to get copies of all labs and keep in your file.

 

Lowering sugar isn't the only thing, ice cream, soda, toast, potatoes, rice, pasta, are just some of the things that can increase blood glucose.  

 

There are many that have been diagnosed  pre-diabetic, which isome thinl is like being " a little bit pregnant".  You don't have to be overweight, short and a couch potato to be diagnosed.

 

Nutritionists will most likely tell you to eat a balanced diet including all the food groups.  As a type 2 for 13 years, that never worked for me and I reduced my carb intake to 30g per day.  There is much controversy about very low carb, but it works for me.

 

I'm sure you will get many supportive answers.  Try not to worry too much and don't get overwhelmed by all the internet "talk".

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Moonpie

Maybe the terminology is wrong, it's easy to mishear over the phone, High hemoglobin could be an indicator of somthing like hemochromatosis (which I have) & not diabetes. I would wait & find out more, once all the blood tests are in. Many things can be addressed with simple lifestyle changes. Don;t worry till you know what you are up against.

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Kit

The doctor was likely referring to her HBA1C, which gives an average of your blood sugar over the course of a few months (around 3, though that can vary).  I think its good that her OB/GYN said something, but now its up to the endo to determine if there really is an issue or if maybe something was going on to falsely inflate those numbers.

 

Now, assuming her numbers are indeed high and she truly is pre diabetic, there are some things to keep in mind.

 

All carbohydrates raise your blood sugar.  So its not just sweets, but every single plant based food out there.  However, some contain more carbohydrates than others, so the trick is to get the most bang for your low carb budget.  Fruit is a heavy hitter.  So are most grains (whole wheat, whole grain, or what not).  Root vegetables are also up there.

 

Really its too early so say "she needs to do X" right now as we still don't have the whole picture.  It wouldn't hurt, however, for her to pickup an inexpensive meter with inexpensive strips and start testing herself before and 2 hours after meals to see what her body is doing.  Doesn't have to be before and after every meal, just have her pick 1 meal a day.  Swap to different meals on different days.  That morning fasting number is honestly the least useful number at this point.  That is usually one of the last places where diabetes will show itself.  Those post meal numbers, however, really help you get a better feel for what's going on.  We add in the Pre reading as a base line for comparison.

 

A non diabetic person is usually going to be back under 100 by 2 hours after eating.

 

I personally use the ReliOn Prime from Walmart.  Meter was $18 and strips are $9 for 50 or $10 for 100.  There are other inexpensive ones out there though.

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JohnSchroeder

For what its worth, I think the nutritionist is a waste of time.  Whether or not it turns out she is prediabetic.

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NoraWI

Should the bloodwork results still show her blood glucose to be higher than normal, I would suggest a request for a GAD65 antibody test. If positive, it would show a slow onset T1 diabetes, otherwise known as LADA. One does not have to have a family history to get it.

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samuraiguy

Welcome to the forums. Just being over 40 and having a family history of diabetes is enough for some people to develop insulin resistance. The good news is by CDC statistics those with prediabetic levels who make lifestyle changes (eat less carbs, as in 130g or less per day), exercise regularly and lose any extra weight keep from developing full on diabetes within 10 years 75% of the time.

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meyery2k

Once you and your wife have the full picture, you can then decide how to manage this.  You will find great advice here freely and selflessly given.  I have used it myself to manage my diabetes.

 

Kit's advice is spot on.  The meter is an inexpensive way to see that the body is doing with meals.

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jwags

I am 5'3" and 110 pounds and have been a full blown type 2 for almost 10 years. I am very athletic and work out everyday and eat a vegetarian diet. The media likes to portray diabetics as unfit and overweight, many of us are thin. I also have 5 kids. Just a FYI, stress of raising kids can cause bgs to rise. Can you tell us what types of meals your wife eats? Even healthy carbs may be problems for diabetics.

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