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Dznypal

does borderline and pre diabetes mean the same thing

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Dznypal

as you all know Ive been playing/fighting this # game for yrs

 

my A1C is mostly between 5.5 ( hit this # just once in 2013 I knew it wouldnt last) to 6.2 which I just hit last month when I went to the clinic for a UTI and had a begian waffle just 1/2 hrs before clinic had these beffore tested and all was fine figured great I found something I like I can eat--I guess its not the case

 

anyways in May I had my #s done and A1C 5.9 12 hr 108 down from last yr

 

so with the sugar in the "P" and finger stab of 195 a few days later my dr did an A1C which was 6.2!!!!

 

in may her comments were borderline diabetic range"

 

now with the A1C of 6.2 she writes A1C indicates sugars are now in pre diabetic range

 

to me borderline and pre mean the same thingany thought

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OneEye

I'd say it's all semantics until you get out your ruler.

 

There's normal, or non-diabetic. Semantics there, too. I mean, I'm a male...which could mean I'm a non-female.

 

Let's use some hypothetical numbers here. Let's say that normal is 5 and below. Not an A1c of 5%...just the number 5. From 5 to 5.90 is pre-diabetic. From 5.90 to 5.99 is borderline. And from 6 up is diabetic. In other words the term "borderline" could actually be specified as "kinda close" if you want.

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dowling gram

Does it really matter what it is called? I think you are getting hung up on a name when you should be more concerned with the results and what to do about them. To me there is no such thing as borderline or pre-diabetic. They are both the early stages of diabetes. It means that you are becoming insulin resistant.

 

The only thing both of them indicate is that you've caught it early enough to do something about it to keep your numbers low. it means that perhaps you will be able to eat more things without raising your BG than you could if it were diagnosed later. In any case a Belgain waffle wouldn't be one of the things you should eat. If you take care now you may be able to go a long time without any medication. As with any diabetic your future is in your hands. What you do now will determine what will come.

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jwags

An HbA1 c is a 3 month average and eating before it will not affect the reaults. I would think Borderline would mean you are close to the pretty Diabetes cutoff which is 5.6-6.4. Full blown diabetes stsrts at 6.5 or a 200 on an OGTT test or random bg. So your 195 is very close to full blown diabetes. If your pancreas was still functioning 100% you would never spike to 195.

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Fraser

It does not really matter what it is called, what matters is when you decide to make adjustments to your life

That makes you healthier. Your decision, no one else's , let us know what you decide to do. : )

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meyery2k

Dzny - You are getting some tough love here.  My thought is that you have to accept that you are "broken" like the rest of us.  While you may not be classified as a full blown diabetic by the numbers, there is clearly a failure in the system as far as clearing glucose in the blood.

 

Diabetes is not the end of life nor does it detract from the life you can lead if you choose not to let it.

 

When I was first diagnosed and realized many of my favorite foods were no longer going to be eaten I was sad and I felt sorry for myself.  It was easy to find posts on the Internet that supported my negative feelings.  It is normal to feel anxiety.  It is normal to maybe think your body or life has betrayed you. 

 

I remember the ADA guidelines saying carbs in moderation were ok but the evidence I saw with my own eyes and common sense showed me that was not the case.

 

I found this forum and, to be honest, at first I thought the ideas here were kooky.  I thought these people were "Atkin's kooks".  Fortunately, I opened up my mind and discovered that was not the case.

 

Life is a series of adaptations.  If we do not adapt, we do not grow and learn.  Diabetes sucks no ifs, ands, or buts...  It has also challenged me to do things I never imagined myself even trying.  Not just with diet and exercise either.  I am living with diabetes  and if I can do that then I can do anything I put my mind to.

 

I emphasize that I am living, not just existing, with diabetes.  I don't let it slow me down.  I eat better quality food and I have learned to make my own food.  I adapt and can eat in most any restaurant (a noodle house might be an exception).  I don't miss sugar, rice, bread, potatoes.  I don't need them.  I have other foods that are my comfort food.

 

Breakfast for me is bacon, eggs scrambled with a little cream and cheddar cheese, and cauliflower nuked for 90 seconds with either a little butter or oil and seasoning.  I put sour cream on my eggs and sriracha.  That, to me, is a perfectly fine breakfast.  I have adapted and don't need the rice, toast, pancakes, or potatoes.

 

You may have the opportunity to control this and live a great life because of it.  It is not the end of living but merely a new chapter that has been written for you.

 

Clearly you are interested in the dialogue here since you actively participate in it.  I would encourage, compassionately, to not argue with diabetes.  It is not an argument that can be won.  The winning strategy is to accept that you are (even if you are close to it) and adapt to living with it in a way that you can thrive.

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carfree

I thought pre diabetes and borderline were the same thing so I'm not sure the difference from what your doctor wrote. I'm pre diabetic also, and I agree that it's best to view it the same as diabetes, but insurance and doctors don't 'count' pre diabetes as diabetes (so no insurance coverage for meters, etc).

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NoraWI

I thought pre diabetes and borderline were the same thing so I'm not sure the difference from what your doctor wrote. I'm pre diabetic also, and I agree that it's best to view it the same as diabetes, but insurance and doctors don't 'count' pre diabetes as diabetes (so no insurance coverage for meters, etc).

And that is a big mistake they are making. Pre- or borderline or whatever- diabetes is still diabetes, only at a very early stage. It is most manageable at that point. It should be addressed as the first step in the diabetes continuum and all the tools needed should be given. Manage it at that stage, and you will stay well controlled for a long time, maybe for a lifetime. Debating the semantics of it is splitting hairs and wasting a lot of valuable time and emotion. Accept and move on.

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Orlando

And that is a big mistake they are making. Pre- or borderline or whatever- diabetes is still diabetes, only at a very early stage. It is most manageable at that point. It should be addressed as the first step in the diabetes continuum and all the tools needed should be given. Manage it at that stage, and you will stay well controlled for a long time, maybe for a lifetime. Debating the semantics of it is splitting hairs and wasting a lot of valuable time and emotion. Accept and move on.

Great advice !!! Grab the opportunity to snuff out the progress of this disease, you wont get a second chance. 

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William V

Diabetes type 2 is like a freight train. takes a long time to slow it down or even stop it. It is suspected to start rolling several to a dozen years before it can be measured with today's science as blood glucose level. Higher blood glucose levels are one of the late in the game symptoms. The pre diabetes "train" is already well on its way to full speed. Other complications may be difficult to avoid or eliminate once it is full speed (diabetes diagnosis) as it takes longer to slow the train down. The longer the train has been running the harder it is to stop. An eleventh hour attempt before the train crashes from complications will take great effort and typically provides minimal benefit.

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meyery2k

William makes a great point.  It is so easy to focus on the glucose level and forget that this is a very complicated and interconnected system in the body.

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