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provlima

Testing ....one hour after meal or two hours??

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provlima

Have read on these forums some test 1 hr and some test 2 hrs after a meal.

Which is the more important  BG reading.

 

Also what is more important in the long run your fasting BG level or your post meal figure.

It is confusing in how all this plays into your 90 day A1c level

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NoraWI

Your A1c is an average of about 6 weeks, although they say 3 months. It is the only number that has any importance. To test at 1 hour or 2 hours after a meal depends upon what information you want to get out of your tests. A pre-meal test is essential to establish a baseline. One hour after the meal will tell you how high you spiked. Two hours after the meal you should be down below 140. Both figures have a role to play in blood glucose management.

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samuraiguy

If you are having trouble getting your A1C lower then fasting and 1 and 2 hour PP bg readings are all important to measure to see where you are going higher than goal levels, i.e. If you want your A1C under 6 then you need to have a FBG under 100 mg/dl, a 1 hour PP under 140 mg/dl and a 2 hour under 120 mg/dl. Once you pretty much know how food is affecting your bg and your A1C is stable for several lab visits, then just measuring fbg occasionally and 2 hour PP is probably alright as long as you are not using insulin.

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miketurco

How I look at it is I try to keep all my readings below a certain number. Most non-diabetics (I think) stay under a hundred pretty much all the time. That's pretty much impossible for me. With pre-d, though, if you really want to get on top this thing, one hundred tops is a really good target. 

 

Anyhow, your highest spike after a meal, for most foods, is likely to be at the one hour mark. At the two hour mark it's good to be close to the number you started with, pre-meal.

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gabrielo

Testing after one hour will often tell you how high your meal has caused you to spike.

It may be possible to then make adjustments to portion size, and food choices to moderate the spiking at future meals.

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xMenace
The two-hour mark represents the best predictor of future blood sugars and required adjustments as most carbohydrates are fully absorbed by then.

This is what Humalog looks like.
 
novolog-dynamics350.jpg



This is what food looks like.

release_rates.jpg
 

 

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Diana_CT

When I was testing 3 times a day my endo told me to test 2 hours after I eat.

I would say follow your healthcare provider's instructions because they might have a fixed time after meals that they tell their patients so if you test at some other time after you eat it might throw off your healthcare providers's thinking what your readings mean to him or her.

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Barry6547

It's interesting that many primary  physicians dealing with prediabetic patients don't appear to take the condition very seriously, other than suggesting one should be aware of the glycemic index and maybe exercise more.  I know that A1c is an important number, but I also see the 2 postprandial numbers, i.e., 1 & 2 hrs. as important information as well.  For example, high spikes at 1 hr. pp may not necessarily affect the A1c, depending on the frequency.  But, I would be worried these spikes, in themselves, could be putting a lot of stress and perhaps damage on those remaining beta cells.  The second hr. after a meal reading is important for me as I want to know how effective my body has responded to the 1 hr. figure.  

 

I saw a doctor at the Mayo Clinic for an issue unrelated to blood sugar matters. When I mentioned in the past I had been diagnosed with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and that I had brought the ALT and AST numbers down dramatically by high fat, low carb, plus exercise, he suggested we do an ultrasound of my liver to get better info. than just from those enzyme tests.  He told me that the liver can experience significant damage before tests such as ALT will signal a problem.  I had never been told by my doctors that a liver ultrasound was an option for checking fatty liver.  In fact, a gastroenterologist's P.A. had said years ago that if my alt did not drop by my next appointment a liver biopsy would be done.  That's when I immediately went to high fat low carb and exercised (swimming) 5 to 6 days a week...and a couple of months later the ALT was normal, in fact really pretty low...and the P.A. was most impressed.  But, for the past year and a half my exercise routine has been virtually nonexistent because of some surgeries...and I am worried that a liver ultrasound now might show, in spite of good ALT's that fatty liver is still a problem.  I almost think I should maybe exercise for a couple of months before having the ultrasound.  I know that sounds crazy, but would be in a quandary if fatty liver is still an issue...and it is recommended that I resort to low fat as I know what that would do to my blood sugar.  In reflection, I suspect my turning around, previously, my ALT numbers was more influenced by my getting a lot of exercise than my diet.  Sorry, did not mean to write a book.  Just a lot on my mind.

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meyery2k

Barry - I certainly don't mean to give unsolicited advice, especially not knowing your full situation, but ANY exercise you can do is good exercise.  While it might not be as rigorous as before your operations, simple exercise is still better than no exercise. 

 

When I was first diagnosed, I made myself go and walk 2 miles a day in the morning and the afternoon.  It would take about 40 minutes to walk 2 miles and, believe me, I looked and felt like I was going to die.

 

I then had to have a skin graft on my face which required me to take it a little easier since I couldn't get excessive sweat on the graft.  I still would walk slowly and at least get out and move around.

 

Many studies have proven that quantity is usually better than quality when it comes to exercise.  Even lifting light hand weights while watching TV would be good.  It will burn off the glucose.  Sure, you might have to do a lot of repetitions, but it is still exercise.

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