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merryj

Insulin load?

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merryj

Primary care doc gave me a list of foods with a high insulin load, but I am not sure what that really means. She said I needed to be aware of insulin load just as much as glycemic load. Tried to find some more information, but no luck. My endo never mentioned this. Any help?

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Hammer

I looked at the chart, and it seems easy enough to understand.  What it shows is what the glucose response is to a certain food, and what the insulin response is to the same food.  If you look at beef, the glucose response is a 21 (plus or minus 8), whereas the insulin response is 51 (plus or minus 16).  Since there are no carbs in beef, you'd expect it to have little or no insulin response, but it has a high insulin response of 51, even though the glucose response was only 21.  An insulin response of 51 means that a lot more insulin was released to cover that glucose response of 21.

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miketurco

I'm not buying into that chart on wikipedia. For example, if you sort on Glucose Score it tells you that oranges are a few points better than eggs and cheese. The "glucose score" of cheese is only one point lower than cake.

 

What you really need to watch is carbs. If you eat a reasonably low-carb diet, (for life,) you've got a good chance of managing your situation with diabetes and preventing the many bad things that will happen if you don't.

 

I'm not a doctor and don't know much about your specific situation. A good ninety percent of the time, though, that is the bottom line.

 

Mike

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carfree

I remember reading an article about this by Dr. Jason Fung. https://intensivedietarymanagement.com/insulin-index/

It is a bit confusing to me too, but Hammer explained it. The reason a large insulin response is a concern is that the theory is that it leads to greater insulin resistance and weight gain, or difficulty losing weight. I would say if you are overweight and dairy or certain protein foods seem to inhibit weight loss, this may be an issue.

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merryj

Thanks all. She gave me the list from the Wikipedia site and did say it was from a small study. I do eat a low carb diet and that is what the endo suggested as best

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TX_Clint

This seems to explain quite a bit http://www.nutrientdataconf.org/pastconf/ndbc35/4-2_sampson.pdf

This report indicates that insulin response is still primarily driven by carbohydrates but is affected by other factors including digestion which as we know is affected by the mix of protein, fat and carbs. Basic foods listed by approximate highest insulin response to least insulin response are shown as compared to white bread.

 

100 = White bread

90 = Breakfast cereals

85 = Sweets

75 = Starchy foods

50 = Fruit

40 = Dairy

25 = Protein

15 = Nuts & Legumes

 

Funny how my glucose responds the same.

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hexex0

I didn't really know this was a thing, but I agree that it looks like it's based on the premise that certain foods produce a disproportionate insulin response (higher than the amount of carbs would call for).  I suppose I can see how this would play into worsening insulin sensitivity tho I'm definitely not sold on the effectiveness of complicating meal choices even further.  Now you have to consider not only carbs, GI, and calories but also the "insulin score"?

 

They also state that it correlates to GI typically but not always, which makes me think it'd be easier to just take the top ranking insulin score foods and say: "watch these foods, they can produce an irregular insulin response."

 

Which, after re-reading it, it seems like is what they did. :)

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stevenal

The big difference here is protein. Many foods that are high in protein have very little carbohydrate. Our livers are pretty good at converting the excess protein we eat to glucose, so we have an insulin response to protein. Those of us that are insulin resistant will see a rise in blood glucose not predicted by a food's GI or GL. Moral of the story is to fuel mostly with fat, while consuming only enough protein keep up with the repair work.

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miketurco

This seems to explain quite a bit http://www.nutrientdataconf.org/pastconf/ndbc35/4-2_sampson.pdf

This report indicates that insulin response is still primarily driven by carbohydrates but is affected by other factors including digestion which as we know is affected by the mix of protein, fat and carbs. Basic foods listed by approximate highest insulin response to least insulin response are shown as compared to white bread.

 

100 = White bread

90 = Breakfast cereals

85 = Sweets

75 = Starchy foods

50 = Fruit

40 = Dairy

25 = Protein

15 = Nuts & Legumes

 

Funny how my glucose responds the same.

 

That's a lot different than that wikipedia chart. This makes sense. Good find on that PDF.

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m2hwb41

I would say to get a cheap meter, like the WalMart ReliOn Prime, and test yourself before you eat, and again two hours later to see how a give food or meal affects you. 

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