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Jon55

10k every other day. Do long runs create sugar lows/spikes?

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Jon55

Hello there, my first post.

Really have a problem with this. I like to be active and run 10k every other day. However, this probably sends my glucose up and down too much? Is this true?

 

How it is with long running - I want to run a marathon but I'm afraid my glucose will vary too much. 

 

Thank you for all the answers.

 

Jon

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adiantum

Hello Jon, Welcome to the forum.

 

I'm not a runner but just wanted to welcome you & say there are a few runners here & will address your questions when they log on.

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samuraiguy

Welcome to the forums. For me it helps to break any exercise up into smaller spaced out portions over the day, i.e. run 3k three times daily. You will still get the same benefits, but minimize any side effects per session.

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Jon55

That's a good option. Do the glucose levels vary that much tho? I really hoped there wasn't that much of an up/down movement that I should worry about.

 

I like the 3k several times per day idea, but I have in my mind to run 42k marathon. So I have to train longer distances.

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Fraser

The answer is yes your blood sugar varies up and down durating long and short runs, for me my BG goes up during hard exercise because your

liver can dump, for longer slower runs my BG tends to drop so I Consume measure carbs such as Cliff Blocks 8 carbs each.

Part of being a diabetic is not jus high or low numbers insulin production can vary (if you make insulin. )if I carb up at the start of a run I can trigger over production on insulin which can bottom put my BG.

For me it just took experimentation, at on point it took my BG reading every mile to see how many carbs I need to consume.

I Only do 5K but On Sunday I started the run at 112 and finished at 117 I consumed 4 Shots Blocs

My first 5k I carbed up to 140 and finished at 52!

So it is a research project.

 

I am 71 and try to run one 5k a month. Hope this helps

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meyery2k

Jon - Welcome to our community.  I am definitely an amateur here as far as the exercise but I believe it is really a "you mileage may vary" affair.  I would suggest testing before and after exercise and you will soon figure out how you work.

 

Diabetes is just a clinical term for excess glucose.  The underlying causes and mechanisms are numerous so it is actually a very personal disorder.

 

My own experience is that I never go low (the lowest I have observed is 70) or high (the highest I have observed is 110) after 3 miles running/walking, swimming a half mile, or cycling.  I am able to manage my diabetes so far with diet, exercise, and Metformin.  I don't worry about the low since I am not using insulin.

 

The only short term comment I can offer would be to avoid getting dehydrated since that can cause quite an increase in BG levels.

 

I don't know your history but many of us here were "surprised" with our diagnosis.  It is possible you were diabetic for a long period before you were diagnosed and you did fine.  Now that you know you have diabetes, you don't have to let it stop you from doing the things you enjoy.

 

Yes, you must acknowledge and respect that you have diabetes.  You may have to make some adjustments.  With some data and the advice here from others that actually run marathons, you will find a way to continue... ~ Mike

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Jon55

Thank you Fraser and meyery2k for extensive comments. 

 

I think that 'acknowledging and respecting diabetes' sums it up quite nicely. 

 

I will definitely try to take my meter and strips with me when I run and see how the glucose moves - that's a smart suggestion, Fraser. It probably is different from person to person, but if I nail the formula how quickly I can run and what can I eat, I think it would be great victory over diabetes when I do the marathon. 

 

Gosh, this community is really useful! :)

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Fraser

Hey Mike just want to add some additional information on Metformin

Yes as you said it does not push your numbers down to a low, but it is designed to control the glucose out put of your liver.

It is possible that during exercise you would need the extra

output from your liver and the metformin blocks it. And with out adding carbs, your numbers drop during exercise which can create lower numbers. This considered not to be the norm, but a possible side effect of exercise and Metformin.

Which is why I stopped taking Metformin.

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Jon55

Hey Mike just want to add some additional information on Metformin

Yes as you said it does not push your numbers down to a low, but it is designed to control the glucose out put of your liver.

It is possible that during exercise you would need the extra

output from your liver and the metformin blocks it. And with out adding carbs, your numbers drop during exercise which can create lower numbers. This considered not to be the norm, but a possible side effect of exercise and Metformin.

Which is why I stopped taking Metformin.

 

I agree that Metformin is a no-no when it comes to long runs. From personal experience, when I was on Metformin a couple of times, I felt really weak really quickly.

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2408

Welcome to the fourm

Everybody is different you need to check after every run.My BG goes up on short runs 10 miles or longer run iam fine you have to Carey some kinda candy with you.I ran whole bunch of half marathons and Marathons including Boston Marathon keeps on checking your Suger and keeps on running!!!!'

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meyery2k

I might be getting back into cycling.  I bought a bike Sunday and rode 10 miles yesterday.  There would be some beautiful rides where I live.  They would be remote so I think I will take the advice here and carry a pack of glucose tabs for just in case.

 

Definitely a case of better to have and not need...

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rfrankr

Well Jon, first of all test test test. I bring my meter on long runs. For me, I've found on any runs I plummet for the first 40 minutes or so. 4 to 5 mile runs. More than that, my BG will climb. 140-150. I counter the initial drop with oreo cookies! One 15 minutes before run, one at the start and one every mile for the first 3 miles. After that on runs longer than 5 or 6

miles I might bring a low carbish snack. But that's just me.

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Jon55

2408, now I'm really impressed and pumped up! 'Bunch of marathons' sounds exactly what I want to achieve, and thought it would be either impossible or very bad for my health. Thanks for leading by example!

 

rfrankr, I like that idea - bringing a meter to a run. Can you suggest any good meter for this? I mean, is it ok if you bring a normal sized one or its better to use a smaller model like freestyle. It should be accurate enough according to http://minimed670g.com/best-blood-glucose-meter/ article; I just don't know where to put a bigger one (I even have problems with where to put the keys).

 

Does the low carbish snack lower the BG though? How quickly - I'm trying to not pause my runs for better time. :)

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meyery2k

My opinion is that any meter is fine.  You are really looking for trends with it.  There are many discussions about the accuracy and precision of meters and it can drive you nuts at first.

 

Meters are "allowed" a +/- 20% error either way.  I don't think any are that bad but it is still food for thought.

 

Basically you want to see what happens when you exercise.  If you start at 100 and then, in the middle of your run, test at 160 you know that is a spike no matter what the meter.

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2408

Jon

About taking Meter with you we runner have special belt like fancy pack.You can buy from running store keys you tie on your shoes with shoe laces.Keeps on Running!!!!!'

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Fraser

I will mention again the cliff blocks. lower glycemic, 8 carbs each easy to push out of the tube one at a time, li was told they were developed for long distance running. They don't spike my BG much. All long distance runners consume carbs along the way

 

Other gels etc that had 30 carbs just destroyed my BG. Raised it too fast and created a reactive low.

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rfrankr

rfrankr, I like that idea - bringing a meter to a run. Can you suggest any good meter for this? I mean, is it ok if you bring a normal sized one or its better to use a smaller model like freestyle. It should be accurate enough according to http://minimed670g.com/best-blood-glucose-meter/ article; I just don't know where to put a bigger one (I even have problems with where to put the keys).

 

Does the low carbish snack lower the BG though? How quickly - I'm trying to not pause my runs for better time. :)

I just bring my regular meter, lancet and strips container(with about 10 strips) and put them in a fanny pack (shh, don't tell anyone I wear one). I need the room cuz I'm carrying cookies too. As far as time, I walk when I'm testing or eating. You don't want to inhale cookie crumbs when you're running! And that's one advantage to oreos, that creamy filling holds things together. And they're 10 grams of carbs each

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Jon55

I just bring my regular meter, lancet and strips container(with about 10 strips) and put them in a fanny pack (shh, don't tell anyone I wear one). I need the room cuz I'm carrying cookies too. As far as time, I walk when I'm testing or eating. You don't want to inhale cookie crumbs when you're running! And that's one advantage to oreos, that creamy filling holds things together. And they're 10 grams of carbs each

Haha that's a one good fanny pack you got there. Someone might say that diabetes test strips and cookies don't mix but you would surely prove them wrong! :)

 

...so I'm on my way to buy a fanny pack. 

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Fraser

I actuall have four different fanny packs large medium and two small. Mostly use medium fits every thing including phone,

Sometimes two small, I keep my shot blocks on one on my front just what I feel like doing.

I going anything hard like glucose tabs are a choking hazard while running. There use to be a liquid heck that was 15 carbs,

But it was sticky and sometimes made a mess it was level life, don't make it any more,

Other commercial gels have too many carbs usually 30.

When I consume 30 carbs of fast acting gel it creates a tacrine low pattern. There is a delay in my system producing insulin and then it works like made then over pricing which forces you cont down and you need to carb up again which starts it all over again

 

Which is why I use Cliff Bloks... I am not a sakes man, but I have spent several years looking for something that works with

Running and T2. FYI some flavor so have have caffeine added others don't

One Bloks is 8 carbs

oops upside down.

I order through Amazon, my local store does not always have the flavor I like

post-56276-0-27373600-1478791740_thumb.jpeg

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Fraser

Sorry that last discussion was about "reactive lows" and over carbing. I need to get an iPad with a keyboard. ))))

I need to type slower, but I am impatient ;-(. I will work on it. Love my iPad for the apps

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