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PatriciaJ

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PatriciaJ

I went to a pre-diabetic class and was told to eat 3 servings of 15 grams per mean = 45 grams of carbs per meal (135/day)?? And to lower the carbs per meal if BS rises too high.

 

I was also told to eat nutritious meals and small amounts of bread and pasta are okay. My doctor told me NOT to drink any fruit juices.

 

I'm still confused. I'll be getting a glucometer after payday next week. I thought I could eat anything I want as long as I read labels and maybe reduce the serving sizes and avoid or limit sugary things.

Last A1C was 6.2 and a follow up will be done in about 5 months.

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miketurco

Most people here don't eat 45g of carbs in a day. I probably get 15 a day myself. Low-carb is the way to go, hands down, period.

 

You don't have to take my word for it cuz' I'm droppin' science here and you can perform scientifical easy experiments for yourself. Your meter is the key to this whole thing. Here's how it works:

 

Test. Eat. Wait. Test. Repeat.

 

Check your BG, eat, wait one or two hours and test again. Do that for like a week, then halve your carbs for another week and continue to test the same way. See what happens. Trust me: it's fun and the results will be very interesting.

 

Welcome to the finger poke club. Nobody really likes being in this club, so maybe "welcome" isn't the right word. But I do wish you the best ;)

 

 

Mike

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NoraWI

The only good thing told you was avoid fruit juices. Learn which foods are carby and do NOT eat them. This is where your meter comes in. As Mike said above, test before a meal to see where your baseline blood glucose (sugar) level is. Eat. Wait 2 hours then test again to see how much the food you ate raised your BG level. This is the way to find out which foods you should NOT eat. This information is the most important reason to test your blood sugar at all. We call it "eating to your meter." BTW, the most reasonable meter (according to what others on this forum have said) is from WalMart. Their strips are the cheapest as well. Important if you are paying for them yourself. Test a lot at the beginning to educate yourself. As you learn this about yourself, you can taper off testing. And take what your health practitioners tell you about diet with a grain of salt :(.

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dowling gram

I agree with what has been said here. There are fast carbs--like sugar in all it's basic forms- that go right to your blood stream. Then there are slow carbs-- Carbohydrates that also have fiber--like bread and grains. These will eventually end up in the blood stream but their progression is slowed down by the fiber. Take 1 slice of bread at 23 carbs. It may have around 4 grams of fiber. You are still getting 19 grams of carbs going to the blood stream.

 

Every diabetic is different and can eat different amounts of carbs so the only way you'll know what effects your blood glucose is to test every bite of food you put in your mouth. Once you know what you can or can't eat it gets easier and you don't have to test as often.

 

Medications and insulin help but the only way you will gain control is through diet.

 

I too, when first diagnosed, had one of those meetings where I was told to eat lots of carbs. I was told you need carbs for energy and it's all untrue. When you cut carbs your body switches to fat burning and that's why we can eat things like cheese. full fat cream and anything that contains lots of good fat without it effecting your health. We never go for things that are lite or fat reduced. In fact most of us who follow this diet have seen a drop in cholesterol.

 

This diet may seem restrictive at first but I have found that there are ways to prepare most of my favorites and yes even cookies, cakes and pies. Our recipe section has ones we have tried and liked and there are many low carb websites to draw inspiration and recipes from.

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funkynassau

OMG more bad doctor advice.  The only good part was to not drink fruit juice.  My doc told me to not drink what I could chew, so keep that in mind.  The act of juicing a fruit activates the sugar.

 

Get that meter asap and learn to eat to your meter.  Find out what works for you and eat those things and avoid the others.  Cool it with the pasta and bread as much as you can stand.

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meyery2k

Patricia - My own personal experience after following this advice on this forum for nearly a year, it works for me. and works well.  I thought it was impossible at first but I eat, on average, about 30-40g total carbs per day.

 

The people posting here regularly have years of experience living with diabetes and generously share the knowledge they have learned.  I can only enthusiastically endorse it.  You will usually find no better advice on any subject than that offered by those that do it for a living.

 

I was very skeptical at first.  I thought I fell in with a bunch of "Atkin's kooks".  Logically, the ADA advice did not sit with me either because I know carbohydrates are easily converted to glucose which is the energy source we need to fuel us.  I had a problem with too much glucose so it made no sense to me to eat things that would produce something I have too much of.  In my IT tech job there is "what the book says" and what we actually do based on the real world.  I adopted this philosophy towards diabetes and listened to people that actually deal with it successfully on a daily basis.

 

When I finally adapted, and adopted, my new diet, my diabetes became very easy to manage.  My doctor is actually having me try and not take medicine anymore as he feels the lifestyle changes I have adopted will prove to be enough for now.

 

Once I learned to think out of the box, restaurants and dinners out are no problem.  My worst fear was getting stuck on a late job and the only thing open would be a convenience store.  This recently happened and I walked in there and had a small pack of macadamia nuts, the snack size of mozzarella cheese, and a salad from the cold case with ranch dressing.  This is enough for me to eat and then work hard the rest of the evening as I needed to.

 

You will learn, through testing, if you can handle bread and pasta.  I find it simpler not to deal with it all but I do admit that I love potatoes and have gladly discovered that I can eat a recommended serving of them and not have a problem with it.  I still only eat them very occasionally though since I want my body using fat and protein for energy vs. carbohydrate.

 

Early on I "argued with diabetes" and had much of the same thoughts you now have.  I can eat anything I want, just smaller portions of it.  While that is true to a point, I found that I could eat more quantity of better things through planning and I eventually hit the trifecta of diabetes control, weight loss, and low cholesterol.  The small amount of bread or rice I could eat was simply not worth it.

 

My doctor summed it up best on day one, "Eat more steak and less potatoes and I think you will find you will manage this just fine".   When I saw what people here ate, I knew I would be OK.  Imagine all the wonderful things you can do with cream, butter, cheeses, nuts, vegetables, and proteins.  Trust us, diet is not a problem and certainly not boring.

 

You are making great progress and the questions you are asking are great!  It shows that you are really thinking this out and this will serve you well as diabetes is actually, in many cases, more of a mind thing than a body thing.  Yes, the body is broken but in many cases diet helps tremendously and that is up to the mind to improvise, adapt, and overcome. 

 

I would encourage you to post your morning fasting readings in the forum set up for this.  I have found that it helps me keep accountable to myself and to my friends here.  You will see we all have the occasional slip and it is not the end of the world.  There is nothing more thrilling to see a new person's numbers drop as they adapt.  The only feeling better than that is actually being one of those people.  ~ Mike

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Kit

 In my IT tech job there is "what the book says" and what we actually do based on the real world.  I adopted this philosophy towards diabetes and listened to people that actually deal with it successfully on a daily basis.

 

I will have to remember that.  Its so very true in the IT world and in dealing with diabetes.

 

I've actually found that convenience stores can be easier than some restaurants.  I can usually get a pack of nuts, some cheese, a small basic salad, or pork rinds, small packs of lunch meat, etc.  Not the way I would want to eat all the time, but quite passable in an emergency.

 

I have to agree with what everyone else here said.  Your meter is your friend (even if it doesn't feel like ti all of the time).  It will tell you what does and doesn't spike your numbers and put you outside your target range.

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