Jump to content
Diabetes forums
  • Welcome To Diabetes Forums!

    Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today to contribute and support the site.

adiantum

email scam

Recommended Posts

adiantum

Just received this scam.

 

Hello Lee Whatsit,

 

You have been issued with a traffic infringement

 

Infringement No...283638494737394

 

Camera  address zip code 2026

 

Date of violation... 5th November 2016

 

Amount Due $396.34

 

 

this fee must be honoured within the statutory period of up to 25/12/16

 

Download this link ...as if

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Gladtobehere

Just delete the emails.

 

When a cop bangs on your door be sure to get a badge number and proper ID.   Just in case they try to scam you with a fake cop! You might even call 911 to report a fake cop.

 

The scamers will get there eventually.   Sad but inevitable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
control

I am always amused at how little thought they put into these scams. 

 

No government office dealing with traffic fines is going to be open on 12/25.     And if they were, 12/25 is on a Sunday this year, so even if the government was at max scrooge level, they'd still be closed.

 

 

Fun fact, regarding the infringement number:

 

28363849 is found in pi starting at position 128561728 and occurs twice in the first 200 million digits.

4737394 starts at position 2560524 and occurs 28 times in the first 200 million digits.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
adiantum

 With my luck I should've realised I'd be caught one day.

 

I wonder if that was the day I was riding my imaginary Harley Davidson along Ocean Road.

 

 

The B/aka control, They've picked my name & postcode from somewhere, & I suspect it was through one of these * save the world * petitions that I sign.

No pity for you, Lee! They should throw the book at you for driving your imaginary car!!! Tee hee hee! :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
OneEye

Fun fact, regarding the infringement number:

 

28363849 is found in pi starting at position 128561728 and occurs twice in the first 200 million digits.

4737394 starts at position 2560524 and occurs 28 times in the first 200 million digits.

 

You've gotten into the sugar again...haven't you?! :unsure:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
adiantum

Ive had a few phone calls supposedly from an insurance company about a car accident I was supposedly involved with.

 

I do enjoy playing with these people.

 

One man ( with accent ) tried to explain I wasn't at fault.. That's when I piped in..

 

" I know I wasn't at fault & you tell that %%*&%##  that if he ever gestures me like that, I'll run him down next time instead of just knocking him over."

 

When some people get excited, they lose their 2nd language ( English ) & it comes out like a high pitch squeal.

Just delete the emails.

 

When a cop bangs on your door be sure to get a badge number and proper ID.   Just in case they try to scam you with a fake cop! You might even call 911 to report a fake cop.

 

The scamers will get there eventually.   Sad but inevitable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
buddy7

When I get sick notes like this through the post or by e-mail, with so much cyber c**p going on out there, I would have to be inhumane in some way not to worry. Don't know about you but things like this does tend to play on my mind specially when there's a demand for money. Knowing I'm not the perpetrator.

 

Where does it all come from???

 

?????????

 

please explain buddy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
adiantum

I think most of us here are wise enough not to click on links in any suspicious email. 

 

I wouldn't waste time worried about them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jims_forum

I think most of us here are wise enough not to click on links in any suspicious email. 

 

I wouldn't waste time worried about them.

 

Here in la la land we get all sorts of scams but lastest scam is the Fake IRS Scam claiming IRS is looking for you! This is phone based and best to have phone block to block these pests! Web real bad for all the scams attempting to extract info and credit cards!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Gladtobehere

Here in la la land we get all sorts of scams but lastest scam is the Fake IRS Scam claiming IRS is looking for you! This is phone based and best to have phone block to block these pests! Web real bad for all the scams attempting to extract info and credit cards!

Here as well.   IRS / CRA (Canada) scams are where I get the Cops coming to the door.  I hated the thick accent dealing with tech support 10 years back......It is laughable for delivering a scam.

 

 

I have tried to keep a low profile on the internet so emails about EBay or my online banking are real easy to spot.

 

Like phone calls......Ignore them.   If something is really important they will call back or send a real mail.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
control

Here in la la land we get all sorts of scams but lastest scam is the Fake IRS Scam claiming IRS is looking for you! This is phone based and best to have phone block to block these pests! Web real bad for all the scams attempting to extract info and credit cards!

 

There are youtubers who video themselves scamming these scammers.  One of the better ones is hoax hotel. Some of the stuff he does is hilarious. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
OneEye

If I got a call from someone saying that I owed them money and if I didn't pay up they were coming to collect...I'd tell 'em, "Fine, evidently you know where I live. The number on my house is hard to read from the street so...just look for the guy sitting on the steps with a Remington 870 shotgun across his lap. Bring a first-aid kit." :angry:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hammer

What I find amusing is that the idiots who do these scams are too stupid to realize that the motor vehicle department doesn't have your e-mail address, so how could they possible e-mail you something....plus the fact that if they had a camera photograph your car (if you had a car) involved in a violation, they always mail you that photo with the included fine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ran23

This winter seems to be more email junk than before.   Insurance call?   Years ago an agent called and ranted on (about a car I sold months ago), realizing I was not going to pay him anything, he screamed what was my insurance company?   I said, 'You are'.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hammer

I think that I've mentioned this before, but I've had some moron (with a heavy accent) call me to tell me that they were calling from a casino in Atlantic City New Jersey, to inform me that they had a cashier's check for $1 million dollars for me, and that they wanted to send it to me.  Knowing this was BS, I said, "I don't want it.  You keep it!  I have close to a billion dollars (I don't), so I don't need a measly $1 million".  I then hung up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
adiantum

Received another scam email today. It looked like a scam, it smelt like a scam.

 

so I went to scam watch & yes,this one has been doing the rounds.

 

 

"Scammers typically send emails pretending to be from Australia Post or FedEx, to try and trick you into believing you have an ‘undeliverable package’. In some cases, these emails may include your name and address and include legitimate-looking company information, complete with fake logos.”

“The email may threaten to charge you a fee for holding your ‘undelivered item’, and will ask you to open an attachment, click a link or download a file to retrieve your parcel. If you follow these instructions, you will likely download a ransomware virus that locks your computer.”

“To unlock your computer, scammers demand payment in the form of bitcoins (a form of online currency) or wire transfer. Even if you pay the fee, there is no guarantee that you will be able to access your computer again.

“Australia Post will never call you out of the blue to request payment or send you an email asking you to click on an attachment. If you receive an email about an undeliverable package, don’t open any attachments or download files – delete it straight away,” Ms Rickard said."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
adiantum

Ive  joined the gov scam watch for notification of the latest scams.

 

Todays email was to warn others of romance scams likely to be prevalent on valentines day.

 

It wont affect me as I'm not interested but posting parts of the email in case it helps others.

 

"The ACCC is warning people to be wary of scammers when looking for romance online with social media now the most common method scammers use to contact potential victims.

In 2016, 4100 Australians contacted the ACCC’s Scamwatch service to report dating and romance scams and more than $25 million was lost: the largest amount of money lost to any type of scam. Stats also show Facebook is a popular contact method used by romance scammers, and that those aged 45 and over are most likely to be affected.

“Reports of dating and romance scams increased by more than a third in 2016 and, sadly, the amount of money reported lost has also increased by about $3 million compared to 2015,”

“Romance scammers are getting increasingly manipulative so if you are going online this Valentine’s Day to look for love, it’s absolutely vital that you’re able recognise the warning signs. This is particularly the case when using dating websites or apps or if you’re contacted by someone you don’t know through social media.”

“Scammers create very believable profiles, including stealing the identities of real, trusted people such as military personnel, aid workers or professionals working abroad. If you meet someone who seems too good to be true, do some research to see if they’re the real deal,”

“Look for inconsistencies in their stories. For example, do they say they are university educated but have poor English and grammar? Is their profile picture legitimate or stolen? These are red flags that you’re likely dealing with a scammer.”

“Also be careful when someone expresses strong feelings quickly after you meet them. A scammer’s currency is ‘love at first type’ – they will use your emotions against you and leave you devastated financially and emotionally,” Ms Rickard said.

“Perhaps the biggest warning sign is when a scammer asks you for money. After gaining your trust – often waiting weeks, months or even years – they tell you an elaborate story involving some crisis, or plan to travel to see you and ask for money, gifts or your bank account/credit card details.”

“This is a scammer’s end-game: to abuse your trust so they can steal your money. Don’t fall for their con – look after yourself when online and don’t be afraid to cut off contact if something doesn’t feel right to you,” Ms Rickard said.

For more advice on how to avoid dating and romance scams, visit our 'Dating and romance' page.

Protect yourself

  • Never provide your financial details or send funds to someone you’ve met online. Scammers particularly seek money orders, wire transfers or international funds transfer as it’s rare to recover money sent this way.
  • Run a Google Image search to check the authenticity of any photos provided as scammers often use fake photos they’ve found online.
  • Be very wary if you are moved off a dating website as scammers prefer to correspond through private emails or the phone to avoid detection.
  • Don’t share intimate photos or use webcams in an intimate setting. The ACCC has received reports of scammers using such photos or webcam recordings to blackmail victims.
  • If you think you have fallen victim to a scammer, contact your bank or financial institution immediately and report it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
adiantum

Adding this latest warning ...

Don't get scammed by dodgy internet pop-ups

Dear Lee,

The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission is warning people to watch out for dodgy internet pop-up windows claiming there are viruses or other seemingly nasty tech problems affecting their computer.

Known as remote access scams, these pop-up windows are used as a ploy to get unsuspecting victims to call a fake support line – usually a 1800 number. The scammer will then ask for remote access to their victim’s computer to ‘find out what the problem is’.

“Once a scammer has remote access to your computer they can install malicious software, steal your personal data, con you into paying for a ‘service’ of your PC, or sell you unnecessary software to fix a problem that doesn’t exist,” ACCC Deputy Chair Delia Rickard said.

“These scammers are very convincing and sound like they’re the real deal when talking about tech issues. The pop-ups they create to lure people in look legitimate and are often made to imitate trusted websites for brands like Microsoft and Apple.”

Scamwatch has already received an average of 300 reports a month about this scam in 2017, with more than $41,000 lost in total. Australians aged 45+ are most likely to encounter and lose money to this scam.

“These pop-ups can often seemingly freeze your computer and clicking the close button on your browser often doesn’t work. This tricks people into thinking there really is a problem and calling the fake support line for help. Your first and best line of defence against this scam is to not call that number and close the pop-up if possible,” Ms Rickard said.

Affected users can close the pop up manually through Windows Task Manager (for PC users) or by using the Activity Monitor (for Mac users). If this fails to work, they can also shut down and restart their computer.

“If you do call the number never give a stranger—no matter how legitimate they sound—remote access to your computer,” Ms Rickard said.

“If you think you’ve been caught by this scam, call your bank immediately and let them know what happened to protect your personal bank and/or credit card details. If your credit card was charged for sham software or servicing, you can try to get your money back.”

Ms Rickard also urged consumers to read the ACCC’s Little Black Book of Scams publication.

“A person’s best protection against scams is awareness and education. The Little Black Book of Scams contains important information about how to spot and avoid scams, to help keep you one step ahead of scammers,” Ms Rickard said.

“The ACCC recently updated this publication to include important new trends we’re seeing from scammers, including in regards to remote access scams.”

The Little Black Book of Scams is available from the ACCC website.

Example of dodgy internet pop-up scam

 

12453b0d-8199-4a84-a705-74fab5e61cb2.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hammer

There is another e-mail scam going around that I wanted to warn everyone about.  You'll get an e-mail, from "Apple Support Billing" stating that there has been unusual activity with your Apple account.  Here is what the e-mail looks like:

 

  Apple Support Billing.

Apple Store.

   

Recently, there's been activity in your Apple account that seems unusual compared to your normal account activities.

Read your secure message by opening the attacment.


You will be prompted to open (view) the file or save (download) it to your computer. for best results, save the file first, then open it in a Web browser.

Sincerely,

Apple

 

 

It will contain an attachment that is supposed to be a PDF document, but it's not.  I called Apple to verify if this was real, and they told me that this was a scam or virus going around and that they were aware of it.  They told me to just delete the e-mail, so I did.  I have received this e-mail twice now, so beware of anything that looks like this e-mail.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.