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John Doe

Your Analysis, Please

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John Doe

Greetings-

 

After purchasing a meter the other day, I've made several readings and have been gathering data. Reading on the board, I have seen folks recommend this methodology: after eating a specific food, 1) collect BG readings at one hour; 2) collect BG reading at two hours.

 

This morning I had a FBG of 98.

 

Oatmeal was consumed.

 

At one hour (perhaps 65 minutes) the BG reading was 144.

 

At two hours the BG =119.

 

What would you recommend regarding oatmeal? Stop consuming it (would be a shame)? Smaller portions? Continue consuming?

 

From reading the board it is apparent that everyone is different and everyone has individual reactions to foods, etc. In spite of that, perhaps you can infer something from this little snapshot of data?

 

Please and thank you and....Happy New Year!

 

 

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meyery2k

Please understand this is a personal opinion...

 

The thinking is when BG is over 140, it is toxic to the beta cells of the pancreas and they will die off (albeit slowly).  If the level is below 140, the lower the better, then the beta cells functions can be maintained AND there is some thought that beta cells might slowly regenerate.  Much of this is theory so it needs to be taken with that understanding.

 

My philosophy is that keeping my BG as close to what is normal for me for as long as I can will help me get a good A1C and minimize the possibility of complications as much as possible.  It is also much easier for me to just eat the things I know are "safe".  Meals are enjoyable with no worry about my BG.  This would be over the targets that I set per samuraiguy's advice to newcomers.

 

So, lecture over, now for the human in me....

 

I do have the occasional off day.  Sometimes there is a celebration or I just want to have a piece of cheesecake.  I will, once in a great while, indulge knowing there will be a price to pay with a BG challenge.  I have found that if the splurge is small and if I exercise the challenge is not too extreme.

 

Specifically with the data you presented, my process would be that I went over 140 and at 2 hours later I was at 119 which was 20 points higher than the 98 I started.  That would be unacceptably high to me on both counts.

 

You could try more exercise on the oatmeal days and see if you can burn off that glucose, try less oatmeal, make oatmeal an intermittent food (like I do with cheesecake and just accept the fact), or no oatmeal.

 

The other thing to watch for is that fasting BG can be a bit elevated the next few mornings as well.

 

I hope this helps. ~ Mike

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Fraser

You did not specify what kind of oatmeal? Oatmeal can spike your numbers but, instant oat meal is the worst, normal in that you need to cook it the old fashion way tends to be better, then there is steel cut oatmeal the closest to whole grain which is suppose to be less of a splike.

As mentioned 140 is considered too high. Especially if you started at 90.

You just need to keep testing and decide. What works for you.

 

For years I had shredded wheat for breakfast whole grain is good ? My A1c was mid 6's

Then I double checked my after eating numbers and eliminated anything over 120,s

I dropped to 5.6 after eliminating shredded wheat and occasional bread. No matter what the spike is, it still shows up in your numbers.

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John Doe

Yes sir, very helpful. Thank you.

 

 

It is also much easier for me to just eat the things I know are "safe".  Meals are enjoyable with no worry about my BG

 

This is exactly what I am trying to map out...the "safe" food as, like you, I am not a big fan of assessing each bite's potential impact on my health and longevity on the planet.

 

Taking the readings is not as painful as I feared but, on occasion, I find I have to stick myself several times. On one reading this morning, the fifth time was the charm. In trying to avoid the finger pads, I aim for the 'side' but then I, at times, don't get enough blood. My process is improving though.

 

So my take-away from your input is 'anything over 140 can be damaging' (something about which I will try to read this weekend) and 'being 20 points over FBG two hours after eating oatmeal is not a rapid enough recovery.'

 

Thanks again.

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meyery2k

You are welcome.  Again, I must emphasize that those are my personal yardsticks.  You will see many varying opinions on this.  This, for me, offers the best balance between actually enjoying life and doing the things that I must do because of diabetes.

 

Finger sticks - Sadly, you will be a pro before long.  A good wash with warm soapy water helps with blood flow and also washes away any residue that can result in a falsely high reading.

 

One day, I tested something like 150 which should be impossible after peeling fruit and not washing hands well afterwards.  My hands weren't sticky or anything but there was enough residue to register.

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John Doe

 

You did not specify what kind of oatmeal? Oatmeal can spike your numbers but, instant oat meal is the worst, normal in that you need to cook it the old fashion way tends to be better, then there is steel cut oatmeal the closest to whole grain which is suppose to be less of a splike.

 

The oatmeal was the old-fashion type, not instant...but not steel-cut.

 

Thank you for the anecdote on shredded wheat. It sounds like you liked that in a fashion similar to how I like oatmeal. I'll miss it. :o Wait...perhaps I can try smaller portions. Denial isn't just a river in Africa.

 

 

Then I double checked my after eating numbers and eliminated anything over 120,s

 

Seems reasonable. It'll take a few months to map everything out but...seems like a reasonable approach.

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John Doe

Elsewhere, I was reading that warm fingers are helpful. Good suggestion, I will pay more attention to that moving forward. We're in a new house and I had the plumbing done with "home runs" meaning that it takes a while for each individual sink to receive warm water. Will pay more attention to this.

 

 

One day, I tested something like 150 which should be impossible after peeling fruit and not washing hands well afterwards.  My hands weren't sticky or anything but there was enough residue to register.

This raises an issue about the precision of the testing. Often I have been told how incredibly sweet I am...perhaps that is contributing to the elevated readings....yeah that MUST be it. B)

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samuraiguy

What I found easier to do is go very low carb for three months until my next A1C and if that was under my goal level sufficiently I added back certain carbs I really loved (my goal was to be under 5.7 and it was 4.9 with Metformin and eating low carb, but this was also after losing over 50 pounds and walking 10k steps per day targeted mostly after meals) not just nibble on if hungry, or restricted them to a few times a week. If eating very low carbs for three months doesn't lower your A1C under your goal level then adding back in any carbs will raise you over that level and you may need more medication, lose more weight or do more exercise after meals to allow the consumption of the higher carbs and then start testing just the selected carbs. 

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Moonpie

I do not test on my fingers, I use wither my forearm or thigh, they do not hurt at all, look for alternate site testing. You can make a hot mush iwth flax & nutmeal, It is not oatmeal, but it is soft & warm to eat. You can also add sf syrups or my personal fave, heavy cream.

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stevenal

Ground flax, hemp, or chia heated with cream and served with more cream satisfy my need for a hot cereal these days. All varieties of oatmeal are off the menu.

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Seagal

I've read that there are certain meters than can test on forearm or other parts.  

 

The one I use says use on fingers to get the most accurate reading (also the One Touch Ultra).

 

Maybe times have changed since I got the VerioIQ.

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Uff Da

I often have trouble getting enough blood for a test, also. Just today I finally had to increase the depth setting on the lancet, up to 5. Previous to that I had drunk a cup of liquid (necessary if you tend to get dehydrated), twice washed my hands in very warm water and stood with my hands held down at my sides and shook them a little to get the blood into the fingertips. When none of that worked, I had to increase the depth of the jab. My lancet device only has two deeper settings, so I hope this one will work for a while. It hurts more, but I had wasted about six strips in the past two days with getting too little blood on the strip so only getting an error message. I also had nearly a dozen tries in the past two days where I got no blood at all. So I guess a few deep jabs that hurt more are better than all those shallower jabs that did no good.

 

I've thought about the alternate site route, also, but I've read that those are less accurate. Since I'm on insulin and use my readings for dosing, I'd like the reading as accurate as possible. Someone not on insulin would just have to evaluate how important the greater accuracy is to you - and even finger jabs are not all that accurate.

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Barry6547

One thought might be to keep a diary of your food intake...with your bg reading before your meal, then your 1 and 2 hour postprandial results.  I try to keep my carbs very, very low, with the occasional exceptions.  I used to love steel-cut oatmeal, and whole grain this and that, but quite honestly I had to pretty much cut out all grain products....so my breakfast is normally black coffee, eggs and a meat, whether it be bacon, sausage or ham.  I usually avoid the ham as many hams are sugared.  My lunch might be grilled chicken breast, turnip greens or mustard greens, cabbage or perhaps green beans...usually two of those...and a salad with blue cheese dressing.  Dinner, again, is very low carb.  But, with such an extreme regimen, I sometimes find myself really craving carbs...and if at a friend's house, might indulge in several potato chips, or whatever helps calm the urge.  Everybody is different, but with patience and commitment, you can get to the level with which you are comfortable.

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Fraser

Barry, I was intrigued by reading your menu choices. After 8 years of testing I have settled into a very similar menu and eating pattern.

Except , no coffee Diet Coke (. I don't really get carb cravings, .

I don't consider it extreme though, just what works best with my body and my BG levels.

 

Exercise has been just as important to me!

 

Good luck to all

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John Doe

 

I often have trouble getting enough blood for a test, also. Just today I finally had to increase the depth setting on the lancet, up to 5. Previous to that I had drunk a cup of liquid (necessary if you tend to get dehydrated)

 

I've read a number of suggestions similar to what you mention..."milking" the finger to get blood to the ends, etc.

 

Can I drink water in the morning BEFORE taking the FBG?

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Uff Da

When I've had a lab blood draw, the nurse has advised me to drink water before I come to the lab to make it easier for them to find a vein. When one is dehydrated, it is more difficult. If they want one to drink water before a blood draw, I'm sure drinking water before a finger jab test wouldn't be a problem. I'm on a diuretic for my blood pressure, so I may be more inclined than many to get a little dehydrated, but I've had so many problems getting enough blood for a test that I now automatically drink at least one mug of water or weak tea before my FBG every morning.

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Barnette84

Just to illustrate how we're all very individual when it comes to this blood sugar thing, when I cut carbs drastically my A1c continued to creep up despite barely weighing 100 pounds and exercising regularly (as I've been doing my entire life).  But when I added back some carbs in frustration (my beloved bread), my A1c went down from 5.9 to 5.7 and has remained there for the past two tests.  Go figure.

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