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PatriciaJ

Pizza

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PatriciaJ

I thought I posted a reply to the Fat Head Pizza link, but I can't find it so I'm starting a new post, lol. I made the fat head pizza dough and added the toppings and it tasted horrible! The dough wasn't the right consistency for a pizza .. too flaky. It was awful and i ended up just eating the toppings. I love Pizza Hut pizzas and think I might try eating just 1/2 of the small personal size, then check to see what it does to my BS.

 

I checked the label on the Hershey's dark chocolate and the sugar content was very high. What about eating one square once in a while?

 

Also my doctor told me to avoid fruit, but I had one small slice of orange with my breakfast and the BS was no higher than when I didn't include the orange slice. Rather than omit our favorite things, has anyone had success with cutting portions dramatically??

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Fraser

As I mentioned in another post. Use your meter and test. Then decide.

My experience Hersey products are candy, all full of sugar. There are other companies that make 85% cocoa chick late

That has less sugar, check the lable.

Portion control of course helps, again test.

Real pizza at Pizza Hut. Sure test it, but massive BG spikes for me and most others (often delayed spike)

 

I know it does not sound like a lot of fun right now, but one can learn to get rid of food that spikes and learn to enjoy new favorite

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Kit

Pizza is notorious for late spikes.  When you do the test, make sure you check yourself at 3 and 4 hours just to be sure on how you react.

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Moonpie

I also think we need to adjust our expectations. Of course a pizza made with fathead is not going to taste like Pizza hut, so we can't expect it to. What worked for me, was going really hard core low carb for about a month ( only proteins & veg ) & then when I had a flax muffin & it tatsed great. Keep trying & find a meal you liek low carb & work form there, but don;t expect it to be the same, adjusting is a key part to  make it last long term. Regarding fruit, I do have small bits of fruit, I split a small tangerine with dh & do ok. They are in season right now.

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Kit

I found what helped me the most was to learn to like the foods I ate for their own merits, not because they were a replacement for something else.

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PatriciaJ

Moonpie, What is dh?

Do you ever eat no sugar chocolate? I found some no sugar chocolate products online.
Apparently they're available at Whole Foods stores?

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Moonpie

dh is dear husband. Around here the drug chains carry the dark chocolate bars, at least, my local CVS does, they have the 70, 85 & 90 % chocolates, I would suggest starting off with the 70 or 75%, & work your way up.

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TheBigNewt

We eat pizza, but only thin crust. Less carbs than regular or the Chicago style big thick crusts. Those are bad news.

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meyery2k

Big Newt - My uncle made pizza one day when I went to visit and I didn't spike anywhere near as bad as I thought I would.  It WAS thin crust too.  Forest for the trees, indeed...

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samuraiguy

The fathead recipe I use comes out perfect for me every time, the key for me is to prebake the crust to make it more crust-like and then top and bake just until cheese melts.

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sweetstar

I love Pizza too.  I have found that thin crust causes less of a spike but there still is one.  I just try to eat less than I used to.

My daughter makes a really good crustless pizza.  She uses ground beef as the crust after broiling it. Then she adds the usual toppings, sauce and cheese.  It is very filling and you can't eat too much.

 

I am also a chocolate lover.  I eat 2 squares of Lindt 85% cocoa once in awhile.  And most times I will eat a few almonds with it as an afternoon snack.

A very important thing to remember is to read the labels and check the carbohydrates. 

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Carol_42

I thought I posted a reply to the Fat Head Pizza link, but I can't find it so I'm starting a new post, lol. I made the fat head pizza dough and added the toppings and it tasted horrible! The dough wasn't the right consistency for a pizza .. too flaky. It was awful and i ended up just eating the toppings. I love Pizza Hut pizzas and think I might try eating just 1/2 of the small personal size, then check to see what it does to my BS.

 

I checked the label on the Hershey's dark chocolate and the sugar content was very high. What about eating one square once in a while?

 

Also my doctor told me to avoid fruit, but I had one small slice of orange with my breakfast and the BS was no higher than when I didn't include the orange slice. Rather than omit our favorite things, has anyone had success with cutting portions dramatically??

"Rather than omit our favorite things, has anyone had success with cutting portions dramatically??"

 

That's an excellent question.  I, too, wrestle with small proportion choices.  It seems the answer is in metabolisms and testing, testing, testing BG levels.  We are all so different.  I'm still working on recipes for pre-diabetics.  I bought a book by Katie Cavuto about cooking and eating with diabetes.  I'm reading it like you would a novel: page by page, absorbing everything.  But honestly, I think some of her recipes are not good for diabetics.  I'm just not sure.  It's like you and I walking into the store and trying on the same pair of shoes.  The shoe must compliment the foot.  The same goes for food and how it fits each diabetic patient.

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LaRue

No cbokay, I don't struggle with small proportion choices, nor to I make any attempt to cut my portions dramatically.

 

 

I eat until I'm satiated/satisfied.

 

However, I decided to adapt to my pre-diabetes condition and develop new favorites, rather than try to push a square peg into a round hole.

 

I personally don't care what receipes, receipe books are out there. I've discovered over the last 3 months what foods I enjoy that fall into the catagories of high fat, very low carb and moderate protein, and combine them as I see fit. I write my own cookbook  :)

 

I've lost 99% of any thoughts I have about eating carbs, because I toughed out the uncomfortable part where my body was transitioning. The day comes where it just loses its appeal.

 

Doing that, not obsessing on trying to force former favorites that have too many carbs and would raise my BG into my diet has worked. It has resulted in the leveling of my BG, and a moderate weight loss of 10 lbs, with no other changes in my current lifestyle, which has always included moderate exercise and water intake, as well as no drinking, smoking or illegal drugs.

 

Can you give details what you find Katie Cavuto is presenting that isn't diabetic friendly? I just searched her cookbook for diabetes, and the only thing I would have omitted from one of the recipes I found was sweet potato. I have to believe that a Registered Dietitian with a Masters of Science wouldn't write a recipe book with meals that are not good for diabetics.

 

Take advantage of the vast store of knowledge that many very intelligent people share here. I think everyone I have read here that is successful has said very plainly that carbs are the challenge. Not so much metabolism (Other your body is unable to process carbs), not fat...carbs.

 

 

Yes, someone may be able to eat an orange, or a slice of pizza, and say "hey, it didn't effect my BG, so it's ok for me to eat" That's like someone having 2 or 3 drinks, then driving a car through a neighborhood of kids, and saying "hey, I didn't kill anyone, so it's ok for me to drink and drive" 

The orange or pizza didn't effect the BG this time, but it needs to be watched. For me personally, I'd just go the route of no fruit until there are further changes with me, and even then, very occassional amounts.

 

It's been an interesting transition, and I probably would have given up, or would not be doing as well, if I kept trying to cling to old ways.

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meyery2k

Brilliant analogy!

 

Yes, someone may be able to eat an orange, or a slice of pizza, and say "hey, it didn't effect my BG, so it's ok for me to eat" That's like someone having 2 or 3 drinks, then driving a car through a neighborhood of kids, and saying "hey, I didn't kill anyone, so it's ok for me to drink and drive" 

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PatriciaJ

These last two replies seem to contradict what's been said before. I tested and found one small slice of orange or I piece of toast with my breakfast or one small potato (not eating the skin) doesn't seem to spike my blood sugar. Most people say test test test and that each person reacts differently to various food items. I like the analogy of drinking and driving, but does it really apply to testing?

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meyery2k

Patricia - Diabetes is more than just watching glucose. It is a fact that carbs are broken down into glucose.

 

What is likely happening is that those of us that make those findings still make insulin. If we are insulin resistant, then we make much more insulin than someone who is not insulin resistant.

 

The belief is that this extra work on the pancreas will possibly wear it out. People with T1 will also tell you that more insulin usually leads to weight gain or making it more difficult to lose weight.

 

I have found that while I can eat some types of carbs with minimal impact on glucose. I still avoid them. I love potatoes but they are a once in a great while thing for me even though they don't hit my glucose too hard.

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PatriciaJ

Patricia - Diabetes is more than just watching glucose. It is a fact that carbs are broken down into glucose.

 

What is likely happening is that those of us that make those findings still make insulin. If we are insulin resistant, then we make much more insulin than someone who is not insulin resistant.

 

The belief is that this extra work on the pancreas will possibly wear it out. People with T1 will also tell you that more insulin usually leads to weight gain or making it more difficult to lose weight.

 

I have found that while I can eat some types of carbs with minimal impact on glucose. I still avoid them. I love potatoes but they are a once in a great while thing for me even though they don't hit my glucose too hard.

Wow! Now this is starting to make a little more sense. Thank you Meyery2k

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meyery2k

You're welcome! We have all been where you are. Soon you will also be advising newcomers :) I asked all kinds of questions at first. It is the only way you will learn.

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LaRue

Also Patricia, I've found for myself that I can eat an identical food, but have a different reading afterwards, depending on other factors. It depends (for me) on when I ate it, if I was tired, stressed out, just exercised or not, etc. etc.

 

Whenever I eat, I find myself, well, not having the thoughts exactly, but the awareness of whether it's being gentle to my pancreas.

 

My belief is if you keep trying to eat foods that are like your old ways, you're sooner or later have to pay the piper.

 

I had a bad day today. Some personal things I'm worried about, went through a challenging time with someone, haven't exercised enough in the past couple of weeks. On top of all that, I had to buy food for someone, and was there while they ate. I couldn't go somewhere to make what I wanted, so I ended up partaking in their meal. Maybe my BG will be fine, but I know now it will take me a couple of days to get back on track as far as my body swinging back and forth between feeling normal, and that weird carb hunger.

 

Just easier in the long run to avoid the whole thing.

 

I have to rest my pancreas.

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Carol_42

Greetings, LaRue~

 

Re: Cavuto's cookbook for diabetics. I'm not going to give a review of this book because that's not my forte. But as a recently diagnosed pre-diabetic, and a person with a curious food addiction called "sustenance", I am looking into recipes that will help me stay out of the range of diabetic 2 status. I bought this book thinking I would learn something new and creative about cooking delicious meals for me, a pre-diabetic. But I was wrong. I still think her book is not written for the health and wellness of pre or full blown diabetics at any A1C level. But you decide for you.

 

I'm not going to post any of her full recipes. But here are three examples in her book that may raise a curious brow regarding carbs.

 

1) Smashed finglering potatoes, 1/2 cup 16g carbs

2) Roasted cauliflower, 1 cup 24g carbs

3) Sauteed greens with cherries & almonds, 3/4 cup, 22g carbs

 

bon appétit

 

~Carol

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meyery2k

#1 and #3 I can see why.

 

I have to wonder how one gets roasted cauliflower to 24 grams for 1 cup when the cauliflower has only 5 grams per cup.  I know there are other ingredients so I am not questioning the accuracy of this statement.  I just drizzle some olive oil on my cauliflower, season with whatever, and pop it in the oven.  No way MY roasted cauliflower has 24g of carbs lol...

 

I find that recipe books will give me ideas and inspirations.  I often have to make adaptations to make them truly low carb.  So, to me, they are not totally useless but I do have to read the recipes with a discerning eye.

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Kit

Greetings, LaRue~

 

Re: Cavuto's cookbook for diabetics. I'm not going to give a review of this book because that's not my forte. But as a recently diagnosed pre-diabetic, and a person with a curious food addiction called "sustenance", I am looking into recipes that will help me stay out of the range of diabetic 2 status. I bought this book thinking I would learn something new and creative about cooking delicious meals for me, a pre-diabetic. But I was wrong. I still think her book is not written for the health and wellness of pre or full blown diabetics at any A1C level. But you decide for you.

 

I'm not going to post any of her full recipes. But here are three examples in her book that may raise a curious brow regarding carbs.

 

1) Smashed finglering potatoes, 1/2 cup 16g carbs

2) Roasted cauliflower, 1 cup 24g carbs

3) Sauteed greens with cherries & almonds, 3/4 cup, 22g carbs

 

bon appétit

 

~Carol

 

Actually the numbers aren't too bad if you realize that the average diabetic is recommended to eat around 60g of carbs per meal.  Not that it doesn't make me want to go hit people over the head for it.  :D

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