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Carol_42

One Touch Delica Lancing Device_Help!

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Carol_42

I wash my hands before testing to make sure there's nothing on them that could affect the readings.

 

But in all honesty, we're not talking serious stabs here.  We're talking tiny pricks.  I draw more blood trying attempting to sew.

 

And, to draw more horror, after I put the blood on the strip, I stick my finger in my mouth to wash away any residual blood.  :)

Hey, thanks for the video.  That's really thoughtful of you.  I'll study it well tomorrow when I'm refreshed.

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meyery2k

You know I am curious, Mike.  <G>  Is it wise, or necessary, to test A1C once a month?  I thought 90 days was the average.  But then I am new at this so what do I know.

I believe it is really up to the person doing it.  It is a simple test.  You use the included lancet (it is designed to be used only 1 time lol so there are 2) to get a drop of blood into the collector, place the collector in the tester and walk away for 5 minutes.  Like a protracted fasting reading.

 

It is inexpensive and it provides me peace of mind that I am managing my diabetes over the long term.

 

Possible fun fact about infection.  Last year I had a basal cell carcinoma on my forehead that required a skin graft to repair.  It looked really ugly and part of the wound care was applying xerofoam (which are just Vaseline soaked cotton dressings) daily to keep it from drying out.  My doctor applied the first set, wearing gloves as expected, to show me how to do this.  He then astounded me by explaining that all I needed to do was make sure my hands were washed.  Gloves were not necessary if I was putting them on myself because my body is "used to" the microbes that live on it.  He had to wear gloves to protect me from him.  I suspect this is the case with the lancets.

 

I, too, was horrified at first and wondered at not using a fresh lancet every day but, to be honest, I got lazy and just don't bother.  Maybe once a week.  Nobody touches my diabetes tools so any germs on them are my own personal "little buddies".

 

I have seen some creepy facts where it is stated the human body has more viruses, fungi, and bacteria living on and inside it than human cells.  In many cases these  are actually beneficial and necessary to some bodily functions.

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Kit

The dietician\educator I went to was the one who gave me my meter, etc and he's the one who showed me how to use it.  He specifically told me it was totally unnecessary to change lancets every time, though I can't remember how often he suggested to change it.

 

He also gave me the tip of lancing the side of the finger and not the tip or pad.as there are more nerve endings there so it can be more painful.

 

He was also the one who said not NOT use alcohol to clean your finger before testing.  It dries out the skin and tend to make it tougher when used on a regular basis, thus making it more difficult or painful to lance.

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Carol_42

I wash my hands before testing to make sure there's nothing on them that could affect the readings.

 

But in all honesty, we're not talking serious stabs here.  We're talking tiny pricks.  I draw more blood trying attempting to sew.

 

And, to draw more horror, after I put the blood on the strip, I stick my finger in my mouth to wash away any residual blood.  :)

Kit, thank you so much for the videos.  I just viewed them and I feel less anxious about messing up when I start using the meter and lancets.  Somehow it doesn't look as complicated or painful as I thought it might be.  I ordered products from Walmart and Amazon and they should all be here by at least next Monday.  Teddy bear hugs  :)

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Carol_42

I believe it is really up to the person doing it.  It is a simple test.  You use the included lancet (it is designed to be used only 1 time lol so there are 2) to get a drop of blood into the collector, place the collector in the tester and walk away for 5 minutes.  Like a protracted fasting reading.

 

It is inexpensive and it provides me peace of mind that I am managing my diabetes over the long term.

 

Possible fun fact about infection.  Last year I had a basal cell carcinoma on my forehead that required a skin graft to repair.  It looked really ugly and part of the wound care was applying xerofoam (which are just Vaseline soaked cotton dressings) daily to keep it from drying out.  My doctor applied the first set, wearing gloves as expected, to show me how to do this.  He then astounded me by explaining that all I needed to do was make sure my hands were washed.  Gloves were not necessary if I was putting them on myself because my body is "used to" the microbes that live on it.  He had to wear gloves to protect me from him.  I suspect this is the case with the lancets.

 

I, too, was horrified at first and wondered at not using a fresh lancet every day but, to be honest, I got lazy and just don't bother.  Maybe once a week.  Nobody touches my diabetes tools so any germs on them are my own personal "little buddies".

 

I have seen some creepy facts where it is stated the human body has more viruses, fungi, and bacteria living on and inside it than human cells.  In many cases these  are actually beneficial and necessary to some bodily functions.

If you/we check our A1c with the home device once a month, we don't need a doctor.  :lol:

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Carol_42

The dietician\educator I went to was the one who gave me my meter, etc and he's the one who showed me how to use it.  He specifically told me it was totally unnecessary to change lancets every time, though I can't remember how often he suggested to change it.

 

He also gave me the tip of lancing the side of the finger and not the tip or pad.as there are more nerve endings there so it can be more painful.

 

He was also the one who said not NOT use alcohol to clean your finger before testing.  It dries out the skin and tend to make it tougher when used on a regular basis, thus making it more difficult or painful to lance.

I ordered some swabs before I learned you don't need them.  And, yes, they would dry the skin, wouldn't they ... Oh, well, I'll use them for something.

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JohnSchroeder

I've been testing for maybe 35 years now.  When I was really little we used alcohol swabs, but not in the past 2 decades at least.  As long as your fingers are relatively clean, you're good.  Just be sensible.  If you were handling raw meat or working in the garden and have dirt/grime all over your hands... Yeah... wash them.

 

But if your hand is clean enough to shake someone else's hand, I wouldn't worry about washing before a test.

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meyery2k

cb - Many here post that the doctor is just there to fill prescriptions lol...

 

There are many interesting posts where the OP gets into it with the doctor or dietician about the diet and their management.  Especially when it comes to eating carbs.

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funkynassau

Are you saying you use one and the same lancet in your lancing device for a month?  So you use alcohol to sterilize the lancet after each use? several times a day for the month?  The thought of that scares me.  <smile>  I look forward to using the ReliOn Prime.

*****

I dont clean mine after each use and most people dont seem to clean theirs either.  I am the only one who uses it, so I just dont clean it, no reason to.  No reason for that to scare you.

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Carol_42

cb - Many here post that the doctor is just there to fill prescriptions lol...

 

There are many interesting posts where the OP gets into it with the doctor or dietician about the diet and their management.  Especially when it comes to eating carbs.

Yes!  Yes, yes, and yes.  My doctor wants to prescribe, prescribe, prescribe.  And it ain't happening with me.  It's irritating.  And you don't dare mention terms such as,  holistic, naturopathy, homeopathy.  Her attitude stinks.  But the tests she has ordered on me may save my life.  I got'ta give credit where it's due.

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