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Carol_42

Can we get an over-load of D3 2000 in our body

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Carol_42

I'm thinking about taking D3 2000 after the doctor stops prescribing the D2 1.25 mg 50,000 that I am now taking.  Can too much D3 be toxic?

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Carol_42

Yeah, that's what I thought, Kit. When diabetes gets under control, does the D level get back to normal?

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Kit

Don't know.  i never had low Vitamin D levels to begin with.  I've always been at the high end of normal.

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jwags

I asked my ONC to run Vit D test and he said Medicare wouldn't pay for it, so he didn't run it. I use to take 5000-6000 iu a Fay and now I dropped to one pill, 2000 iu. I am afraid if I am high I am doing damage. I live in Ohiomwhere we see very little sun in the winter, so I am sure I am low. But how do you get your doctor to test?

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Kit

I just said, I want a Vitamin D and B12 test and she ordered it with the rest of my checkup labs.  I usually request them both be done about once a year.

 

I've lived in rainy cloudy Seattle for over 22 years now.  I'm also a vampire and try to avoid direct sunlight as much as possible (I burn so easily and bright light really hurts my eyes).  While our bodies can use sunlight as a means to create VitaminD, that is not the only factor.

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NoraWI

My husband takes Vitamin D because he is handicapped and housebound. He gets his health care at the Madison, Wisconsin, Veteran's Hospital. They test him once each year and try to keep his V3 under 50. Over 50 is an overdose. But from what I have read, overdosing isn't such a horrendous thing. All I remember it doing is causing diarrhea. Google "Vitamin D overdose" for more information. To lower his levels, I give him one 2,000 pill each day except Sundays. I noticed that Vitamin D has also helped a bit with his cognition.

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Uff Da

My doctor gave me a vitamin D test within the first year or so after I became diabetic. I don't recall the number, but I did show a deficiency. She had me start on an OTC 2000 iu vitamin D3. That brought it up to normal at a follow-up blood test three months later. That was probably four years ago or so. She has ordered a test about once a year and I've stayed within normal range by continuing to take 2000 iu daily much of the year and backing off to 1000 in the summer. However, I live in the Pacific Northwest where it rains about half the year so I don't get out and see sunshine then at all. And I have rosacea, so even in the summer when I do get out I have to use sunscreen. So you might have the ability to absorb more from the sun than I. But I obviously need to continue the supplement to keep my D levels up.

 

When I have my vitamin D tests at the lab, they make me sign a form that I'll pay for the test if Medicare won't. But Medicare has always paid. I suppose that is because I was originally found to be deficient in vitamin D, so the follow-ups get covered. It may depend upon how the doctor codes it.

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dowling gram

Most people who live in areas that have winter are deficient in Vitamin D3. We get no vitamin D3 from the sun in winter because the sun is too high to impart vitamin D3 in winter. In addition if you use sunscreen in summer you are cutting down on the Vitamin D3 you are getting from the sun. 15 years ago I had severe Osteoporosis and I started taking 2000 IU of Vitamin D3 and calcium daily for my bones. You need Vitamin D3 to make the calcium work. In a few years my bones were back to normal and I have continues with the 2000 IU of Vitamin D3 until this day with no side effects.

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jwags

I think I am going to ask my Endo to test my levels when I see her in March. When I was in the hospital last June, one of the doctors who stopped in to remove my pain block told me they did a study with a lot of healthy Cleveland Clinic Nurses and the majority of them were Vit D deficient. I have had Medicare deny metabolic tests. Maybe they don't like the coding my doctor uses.

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Uff Da

jwags, in doing a web search on vitamin D and diabetes, I see that there has been research indicating a high correlation between vitamin D deficiency and early stage type 1 and also higher risk of death for those type 1s who were low in vitamin D. There seems to be some relationship with type 2's also, but if that relationship is weaker or more recent, I'm thinking it is possible that the test might be covered for type 1's but not type 2's. Just guessing here if you still find it is not covered under Medicare.

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ran23

I was up to 12, K of D3 for a while and my Thyroid starting acting up. TSH was up to 5.2 from 1.4 7 years earlier.  I back off my D3 and tested again.  Lucky to have a Doctor willing to work with me.  

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georgepds

http://nutritionfacts.org/video/resolving-the-vitamin-d-bate/

 

The above is a link to a discussion on this problem. At the end the video he shows a graph of blood level of vitamin  d vs months of supplementation at rate up to 10,000 IU/day.

 

He first concludes "Working in from both ends, the level at which our body appears satisfied translates to about 2,000 IUs a day, which should get us right into that U-shaped longevity sweet spot—whereas the Institute of Medicine recommendation appear too low, and the 10,000 IU recommendation put forth by others appears too high."

 

It's part of a series if you are interested. The main message is higher levels of vitamin D in the blood reduce all cause mortality. Where he first thinks there is a sweet spot, he later concludes that higher is better. ( The first results were done for a morbidly ill population, and the sicker people were taking more vitamin D)

 

IIRC, most labs recommend 30 nmol/L, but he makes a case for 100 nmol /L

 

 

 

 

--G

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