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mystiquarte

Hi this may be a unique type of question but there maybe others that are facing the same issue...

I'm finding it increasingly more difficult to find a decent breakfast cereal that meets my nutritional and dietary needs, if it tastes half decent is an added bonus!  I was excited by a recent 'on sale' purchase of breaky cereal that cost only $2 per box usually I check the nutritional panel and go over it with a fine tooth comb looking for things that upset my anaphylaxis but as I've had this cereal before I didn't...I got out of the store and realised it was so bad sugar per 100g was 7.2 and the carbs were 17 or 18g per 100g both of which I've being trained to avoid.  So tonight I thought I'd have a look online at what options are available, so I can make a more informed choice next time...

Nothing...zip, zero zilch well that is if taste isn't a consideration, which I think it is satitarium make  gluten-free weetbix but after testing it I really don't like it as it's like eating shredded hay and the curly-worms inside packaging.  Kellogg's have a new special K, which prior to anaphylaxis I use to love but the gluten-free version is over the sugar limit.

There are quiet a few options that all have a sugar index of over 10 or 12 grams per 100 which is just insane...is it that hard for them to make a breakfast cereal that is under 5g per 100g and under 16g of carbs per 100g??  I wouldn't have thought so...I guess people like me that have speciality diets and life threatening health concerns don't get to have an easy breakfast option.

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ant hill

I try not to Laugh, as I walk down the isle of a place ware you have your Breakfast Cereal and all I see is just Sugar Boxes, anything that comes in a Box has preservatives in them. They claim nutritional value ware as they don't. Eggs & Bacon or an Omlet.

I would look for fiber elsewhere.

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dowling gram

All cereal is made with grains as well as having added sugar. If you crave cereal Make your own nut and seed granola. You can find recipes on line to make your own granola. Try " ditch the carbs" Theirs is made with shredded coconut seeds and nuts but there are others. You only have to look. You'll get better nutrition and way fewer carbs.

 

I've found that anything that comes prepackaged is a no no for me. A few minutes in the kitchen lets me stay on track

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NoraWI

Like Dowling Gram says above, ALL cereals are made with grains. Grains are high in carbs (sugar is part of the carb number). I do NOT eat cereals. My husband, who is not diabetic, likes cereal for breakfast. But even for him I like to select cereals that have fewer than 25g of carbohydrate per official serving. I have found only 5 and cycle through them in turn. Twenty-five grams of carbohydrate is too much for a diabetic and the serving of 3/4 or 1 cup is meager. Make your own or do without.

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samuraiguy

This is why I DIY 99% of my food these days and one of my favorite things to do is take a food I love and then find a low carb (or no carb) replacement for it online. There will be a little extra work on the front end, but you can make large batches of your own version to store and eat in portions free of stressing over what may be in it that harms you.

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davef

Two things come to mind:

 

(1) I pretty much don't bother looking at the "of which are sugars" section and really just focus on carbs per 100g, I apply that to everything and not just cereal as it's the carbs that are the issue. Also don't forget to factor in the number of carbs in the milk you use on the cereal.

 

(2) When it comes to cereals I have always (pre-diabetes and since) eaten them because I liked the taste and not for nutritional value. When I was first diagnosed and not on insulin, I just stopped having cereal as it always sent me too high. Now that I have a bolus insulin, I will very occasionally have a bowl of cereal as a treat. Being honest the only cereals I like/eat are cornflakes and rice krispies, nowadays when I'm having a bowl a treat it will be cornflakes.

 

Darn it, now I want a bowl of cornflakes with ice cold milk ;)

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funkynassau

Good luck in that cereal hunt.  I gave up on cereal years ago, it just doesnt work for me nor most others with diabetes.  For brekkie I usually have cottage cheese with a few berries on it and a slice of the lowest carb bread I can find.  Being in Canada our options are way less than those in the US but I recently found President's Choice whole grain and quinoa bread at 9 carbs a slice!  It tastes ok and will let me have some bread at brekkie, the only time I eat it.

 

Bacon and eggs or similar on either Sat. or Sun., not both days.  It'd be so wonderful if food companies would take a bigger/better interest in those of us with diabetes, but they dont seem to care.  It's all about gluten free which annoys me as I dont have that problem.

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stevenal

For "cereal", I keep milled flax, chia seeds and hemp hearts all handy. Nuke a quarter cup with cream, and add more cream and a few berries or nuts before serving.

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Gladtobehere

Yep, Packaged cereal is a no no for me!      I can still eat certain bread (more nut and seed than grain)   So peanut butter on toast is my typical brekky.   With Coffee of course.

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Moonpie

Maybe try a tofu scramble. but if you really want a cereal, I agree with those who say make your own, it won't be hard to make, & if you make one you like, just make a big batch for convenience.

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Uff Da

Cereal has been out for me in the morning, though I'll occasionally use some buttered cornflakes on a casserole at dinner. I've found that I need twice as much insulin for the same number of carbs in the morning as I do later in the day. You might want to check your response to carbs at different times of day, too, as many of us are more carb sensitive then.

 

Eggs have been my breakfast staple until recently. But why stick to just "breakfast" foods? I use leftover meat or fish for breakfast a lot. A green salad topped with tuna, sardines or anchovies works, as does soup. I've even started using my cocoa-peanut butter "dessert" (in the recipe section) for breakfast. I call it dessert because of the artificial sweetener included, but since the main ingredients are cottage cheese, peanut butter and milk, it functions as a high protein dish.

 

Think outside the (cereal) box.

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mystiquarte

All cereal is made with grains as well as having added sugar. If you crave cereal Make your own nut and seed granola. You can find recipes on line to make your own granola. Try " ditch the carbs" Theirs is made with shredded coconut seeds and nuts but there are others. You only have to look. You'll get better nutrition and way fewer carbs.

 

I've found that anything that comes prepackaged is a no no for me. A few minutes in the kitchen lets me stay on track

Thank you dowling gram, I really like this idea and I can see myself making a granola with favourite nuts and grains and enjoying it with berries for breakfast yum!  Like everyone, I have to watch my carb intake and I don't mind being in the kitchen.

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mystiquarte

Bacon and Eggs

 

I try not to Laugh, as I walk down the isle of a place ware you have your Breakfast Cereal and all I see is just Sugar Boxes, anything that comes in a Box has preservatives in them. They claim nutritional value ware as they don't. Eggs & Bacon or an Omlet.

I would look for fiber elsewhere.

 

Bacon and eggs aren't an option for me, if I eat even a little bit of egg I could die.

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jwags

The only cereal I can eat in small portions, 1/4 cup is Nature's Path Psyllium and Oatbran cereal. I normally use it to top my unsweet Greek yogurt. I have made my own granola out of nuts and seeds and it is pretty good.

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mystiquarte

 Twenty-five grams of carbohydrate is too much for a diabetic and the serving of 3/4 or 1 cup is meager.  

Personally, that serving of cereal is what I would have over two mornings - not one - I could not eat that much for breakfast ever

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mystiquarte

Cereal has been out for me in the morning, though I'll occasionally use some buttered cornflakes on a casserole at dinner. I've found that I need twice as much insulin for the same number of carbs in the morning as I do later in the day. You might want to check your response to carbs at different times of day, too, as many of us are more carb sensitive then.

 

Eggs have been my breakfast staple until recently. But why stick to just "breakfast" foods? I use leftover meat or fish for breakfast a lot. A green salad topped with tuna, sardines or anchovies works, as does soup. I've even started using my cocoa-peanut butter "dessert" (in the recipe section) for breakfast. I call it dessert because of the artificial sweetener included, but since the main ingredients are cottage cheese, peanut butter and milk, it functions as a high protein dish.

 

Think outside the (cereal) box.

 Again I'm limited with my anaphylaxis I cannot eat those things:  wheat/gluten & seafood, so it's taking the box and tearing it up because I am just so limited to what I can eat safely...its a different thing entirely.

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