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LaRue

Fasting blood glucose testing question

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LaRue

Hi Gang

 

I'm going to see my new doctor for the first time tomorrow (had to switch because of AHC, no problems with that).

 

I'm excited to see her for several reasons.

 

First, I'll get to officially see how much weight I've lot since mid November eating keto. I've weighed myself maybe 3 times, but I'd like it on record.

 

In a tie with first is having my A1C taken. I can't wait to see what the result will be.

 

Third, I'm interested in how eating keto as effected my lipids, cholesterol, etc. I have a feeling they will be good, but I would hate to see problems due to the high fat I'm eating.

 

Anyway, to my question.

 

The appointment isn't until 1:30, and I probably won't give blood until 2pm. I don't want to fast that long, and I don't want to come back another day.

 

I know what my fasting blood sugar is when I get up. Slightly elevated, morning syndrome. I know it gows under 100 if I eat or don't eat within a couple hours of getting up.

 

Most importantly, I know that eating something like bacon and eggs isn't going to change my blood glucose as far as what they will take and call my fasting glucose.

 

Should I just go ahead and eat a couple eggs and maybe some bacon, or other no carb meal a couple hours before the doctors appointment, and just tell them I'm fasting?

 

 

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Fraser

If the Doctor and the lab provide you with the definition of fasting and the requirements you need to follow them.

If they say 10 hours fasting then you should not eat anything 10 hours prior to the lab work

Which means morning afternoon or evening does not matter

Fastening. Does not necessarily mean when you wake up.

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Uff Da

Blood lipids are normally tested after a fast of 10-12 hours. I've seen some suggestions that that should be changed, but I haven't seen any labs that have actually changed it. I think it is really important you follow lab directions, as the range they state as normal will be different fasting versus not.

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LaRue

My question is what is the reason behind that if I know that an hour after eating my BG would be 95, and if I don't eat it would be 95?

 

 

On my keto diet, my BG doesn't go over 100 unless I specifcially eat something with a few more carbs. I know and will tell them that when I wake up in the morning my BG is elevated anywhere from 101 to 110. That goes down within an hour or 2. By the time I go there, it will be the same regardless of whether I eat or not.

 

I'm not one to just fall in line with "because I said so".  What's the science behind it? I'm not saying I won't comply, but if they are going to get the exact same reading at 2 in the afternoon whether I eat a piece of cheese or not, why bother? I've been testing multiple times a day for 5 months. What are they going to find out from one reading, the would be the same whether I was fasting or not?

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LaRue

Blood lipids are normally tested after a fast of 10-12 hours. I've seen some suggestions that that should be changed, but I haven't seen any labs that have actually changed it. I think it is really important you follow lab directions, as the range they state as normal will be different fasting versus not.

 

 

Ah! We cross posted.

 

Now THAT makes sense because of the lipids.

 

Thanks Uff Da!

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Uff Da

Since you are going to have your blood test tomorrow, don't forget to take your glucometer with you and do a fingertip test within a few minutes of the blood draw. That way you'll be able to compare your result to the fasting glucose lab test. I do that with each of my meters when I have a lab draw and over time it gives a really good idea of how accurate it really is - or how far off in which direction, if that's the case.

 

corrected for typos

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jwags

My doctor usually tells me that I have to fast for certain tests. If she is running Lipid tests the Lab will ask you how long you have fasted,

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Hammer

If you are just having an A1C test done, then you don't need to fast, but if you are having a lipid panel done, then that requires that you fast, since eating before the tests can skew some of the results.

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LaRue

Hi all.

 

I did end up fasting so I could get the test that day, and not have to return some other time.

 

The interesting thing is, by the time the blood work segment came around, I was already over any morning hunger, and was just cruising along.

 

Yeah, I get the lipid part, needing to fast. I hadn't orignally thought of that. I appreciate people bringing that up.

 

It was actually a opportune thing, because I have been considering experimenting with intermittent fasting, meaning not eating for 16 hours or more, and putting my eating period in the remaining 8 hours. Not as an everyday thing, but to mix things up, keep my body on its toes. I ended up eating at around 4pm, and then again sometime between 8p and 9pm.

 

You know what? It made the day a lot simpler. I hadn't started the fasting because I would get hungry for breakfast, would think about how I had an activity in a couple of hours, and didn't want to be hungry doing that. Yesterday was my chance to see that the hunger quickly goes away, and you're back on cruise control.

 

We'll see how it goes.

 

My grandmother ate 2 meals a day all her life. I would see her almost every day, and saw what she ate. I don't remember ever seeing her snack.  She was an immigrant from Poland back in the 1910s. Like the people she grew up with, she ate a substantial meal in the middle of the day, like 1pm, and ate someting lighter, or finished what she didn't eat at lunch, for her supper.

 

Anyway, I'll be getting the results of the bloodwork in a few days. I'm excited.

 

It was the first time seeing this new doctor, and obviously we have no relationship yet. I guess I'll reserve judgement, but she did say a couple of things which flustered me, because she assumed to know about my history, or put me in some slot she had made up her mind about, without full (or any) info.

 

Example:

I gave her a copy of my last blood work, and said I was now eating a keto diet for the last 5 months, so expected a big improval. She got this half dismissive look on her face. I mean, she doesn't know I was never a junk food junkie, or if this was something that ran in my family, or anything.

 

The only question she asked was "So if your bloodwork comes back as improved will you go back to adding carbohydrates and eating more normally?"

 

More "Normally?"  :angry:  You mean eating way to many SAD carbs so you can put me on medication, which will increase my desire for carbs, so I can be put on more medication, which will.....etc.?

 

I did say my only concern was re my lipid panel, but I didn't think that would be an issue, because my cholesterol has always be very low. 

Her only, and I mean only concern for some reason, seemed to be potassium levels. She brought it up twice. She never asked me what kind of food I was eating, and looking up potassium rich foods, I see that I get quite a bit. No less, probably more, than before keto.

 

 

 

It seem like in the last minute and a half of the exam, some of the things I said clicked with her. 

 

One of the first things I had said to her was that my mother died of diabetes. In the last couple of minutes she said at one point "Oh, that's why you're so concerned with your A1C" It was when she was (finally) actually looking at the paper that had my last blood work. LIke she couldn't hear the words "My A1C was 6.1 last time", when I said it, and had to see it on paper. 

 

She also actually raised her eyebrows and said "Oh! Your lipid panel is Really Good!" I replied, "Yes, about 3 years ago I had a Carotid Artery Screen, and the results came back with 0% plaque buildup" Her response? "Very good. That's rare" 

 

Ya think?

 

If only she had listened to, and talked with me the way she had in the last 2 minutes of the exam, it would have been much more productive.

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