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Ly_atdia

Need advice. 18 type 2. Lose everything

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Ly_atdia

I'm new here. I'm 18 years olds. And recently know that I have diabetes type 2. It comes from genetic( grand parent). I lose all motivation to live this life, tired of taking tablet. Of course, I'm obese. And now just hit gym to lose weight. My blood sugar at first was 202 and decrease to 143 and today 101. But I have no idea. What blood sugar really mean? Am I the same like normal people.

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Joisey

Coping with the initial diagnoses can be very difficult. Everyone on this site has gone through it (or are going through it), and we're here to help. At first I would recommend setting small, attainable goals and achieving them. This will help boost your confidence. As for the energy, have you reduced your carb intake? It took me at least 3 or 4 months to have any energy at all and probably 6 months to return to normal. After years of trying to control BG, eating LCHF, and walking at least once a day, my energy levels (and mood) have been steadily improving. You can do this.

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macksvicky

Welcome to the forum! Yes. you are a normal person. Having diabetes is NOT a death sentence, there are a lot of us here that have been living with it for decades and we're still here enjoying life and doing well. Having diabetes means making different choices with what you eat, finding exercise you find enjoyable like walking, riding a bike, dancing to music, it doesn't mean you have to work out like a fiend for hours at a stretch. And trust me when I say eating low carb meals is most enjoyable, none of us starve nor do we eat nasty tasting foods just to keep our blood sugar in line.

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Dave_KC

First, as others have said, this is not a death sentence.  

 

Second, you really will need something of an education about things, in particular two key medical terms.  One is blood glucose and the other is A1c.  

 

Blood glucose is the amount of "sugar" in the blood.  Fasting it should normally be below 100.  After means it should normally spike to 120ish, but the body should naturally drop it down, and quickly.  This test (especially the home tests) only show what's in your blood right now.  

 

The second term is A1c.  It's a different measure, and it indicates how your blood glucose has been running for the last 3 months.  It should be below 6.0, really below 5.7 for a non-diabetic.  The higher the number, the bigger the problem.  In the long run, this is the number to pay attention to.  

 

When I was diagnosed before Thanksgiving (US version), I was over 300 for my blood glucose, and 12.6 for my A1c.  I immediately changed my diet to low carb, and dropped it in months to 7.4, and I get it tested again in May.  The insurance and Dr. want it below 6.5 as a diabetic, but I'm aiming for below 6.0.  

 

This is a shock to you and your system to deal with this, and to deal with it so young.  But with support and encouragement, you can get this under control.  But it'll take hard work.  

 

Hang in there, this is a great place to get advise, help and encouragement!   

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Orlando

See here, there is a lot of useful information, http://www.phlaunt.com/diabetes/

 

Also read the threads here on the forum, its a great way of learning and of getting a good sense of proportions.

 

You will get plenty of encouragement and help, ask plenty of questions. I wish you get off to a flying start.

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meyery2k

Diabetes was the encouragement I needed to start taking better care of myself (I am 50).  One year after diagnosis I lost about 100 pounds of weight, I can run 6+ miles, bike 75 miles, and swim 1 mile.

 

It was hard work but not as hard as I had feared it would be.

 

Just walking is great exercise.  I lost 75 pounds just walking because it was all I was able to do at first.

 

You will get great advice here and will find that diabetes is not the end of anything.  It is just something we live with.

 

You can do this! ~ Mike

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Ly_atdia

I see. But here a thing, when i was at the hospital. My BG is 202, after two-three day it drop to 143, and yesterday 101, and today is 83. Does it gonna drop? Or what is mean for A1C? Does the BG DECRESE AND the A1C will decrease too.

Or will I stop taking tablet?

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meyery2k

You will work closely with your doctor to decide whether you need to take medication or not.  Everyone's circumstances are different so it is not easy to answer whether you will be able to stop taking medication or not.

 

When you refer to your BG, are you referring to your fasting BG?  When are you testing?

 

The A1C is an average of the past 3 months so if you keep your overall BG reduced, the A1C is expected to be reduced as well.

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Kit

I see. But here a thing, when i was at the hospital. My BG is 202, after two-three day it drop to 143, and yesterday 101, and today is 83. Does it gonna drop? Or what is mean for A1C? Does the BG DECRESE AND the A1C will decrease too.

Or will I stop taking tablet?

 

Your Blood Glucose level is how much glucose is curculating in your blood stream at this second.

 

Your A1C 9or HbA1C to be more accurate) measures the amount of glycated hemoglobin in your system.

basically hemoglobin in a protein which exists in your red blood cells.  That hemoglobin can bind with circulating glucose, which is glycation.  The higher your glucose levels, the more hemoglobin that can become bound to glucose.  Red blood cells last on an average of about 3 months.  Hence the A1C test can give an idea of your average blood glucose readings over a period of three months.  It can't, however, tell how high or low you get, just an average.

 

So yes, as your blood glucose goes down, your A1C will also lower.  However, since it is a three month average, it will take more time to drop.

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jwags

It sounds like you are doing great with your blood sugar numbers. What tablets are you taking? Normal people's blood sugars are 70-100 for fasting numbers and less than 120 after meals. So it seems like you have normalized your numbers with medication. DIet and exercise also helps to normalize our numbers. When you test your blood Sugsr with your bg meter you are getting your reading at that second. Your bg will change up and down all day long. Your HbA1 c tests the amount of glycation or sugar coated blood molecules in your blood. Since your blood molecules tend to love for 90 days, it gives you a 90 day average of your blood sugars reported as a percentage. Normal HbA1 c is low 4's- 5.6. Diabetic HbA1 c's are over 5.6 for a Pre Diabetic and over 6.5 for a full blown Diabetic.

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Ly_atdia

So. Just to make it clear. If I can control my blood glucose, so basically, I can prevent from the complication, isn't it?

And if the big complications is prevented. How about the small conplication. Like skin, or other?

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Ly_atdia

So. Just to make it clear. If I can control my blood glucose, so basically, I can prevent from the complication, isn't it?

And if the big complications is prevented. How about the small conplication. Like skin, or other?

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Kit

Yes, the entire point of keeping our numbers at non diabetic ranges is to avoid all complications.

 

However, there is something to keep in mind.  Your morning fasting reading is only a very tiny piece of the overall picture.  Much more important and useful, in my opinion, are your after meal readings.  It doesn't matter is you have great morning numbers if you're spiking way above normal after meals.

 

So early on I was testing myself 6 times a day.  Basically right before and two hours after I took my first bite for each meal.  My personal goal was to get my numbers back down close to my pre meal reading within that 2 hours.

 

Now that I've gotten a handle on things, I spot check before and after 1 meal a day to make sure I'm still on track.  As long as my spot checks are good, and my A1C is staying somewhat steady, I know I'm good.

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Ly_atdia

So I heard about ampuatation. What are you guy think?

I have some red spot on my feet, like you know man thing. Play and get wound. I kind of scared!

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Kit

Right now what you need to do is step back, take a deep breath and relax.

 

For example, I was diagnosed with an A1C of 10.4 and BG readings well into the 200s.  Three years later I'm perfectly fine.  Well ok, that's not completely accurate.  My foot hurts like crazy but that isn't due to diabetes but due to me getting into a kicking contest with what turned out to be an immovable object (fence post).  I lost.  :D

 

The worst thing you can do to yourself right now is to become obsessed with everything that can go wrong.  Yes, diabetes needs to be taken seriously.  Some very nasty things can happen.  That's why we monitor our blood glucose, are strict about what we eat, exercise, and similar.  But you can't live your life constantly obsessing about every little thing thinking it means you're going to loose a body part.

 

Accidents happen.  We hurt ourselves now and then.  Just pay attention it it, make sure its healing, and seek medical assistance if things appear to be getting worse over better.

 

Since I have been diagnosed diabetic I have managed to hurt myself in a number of ways including stepping on glass twice putting two large gashes on the bottom of my foot, slamming my finger in the car door, shutting the car trunk on my head (don't even ask), and coming near to breaking my foot (that fence post thing).

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meyery2k

Amputations usually occur when people don't do anything about their diabetes for years and years.  Diabetes must be respected but not feared.  You will find many people here have lived decades with diabetes and they aren't losing their limbs.

 

You are wise to take this seriously but you are very likely to find that it is manageable with some changes in lifestyle.  You would seem to be going in the right direction based on the BG readings you have shared,

 

Diabetes shouldn't stop you from anything.

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Dave_KC

Since you're 18, you've got a lot of life left to manage this.  So, you can live for decades if the disease is managed and never have an issue with amputations.  I know plenty of diabetics with all of the appropriate appendages.  

 

But my primary job is in a homeless shelter, and a lot of the clients have years of not taking care of themselves, either by choice or by circumstances (or both).  In those cases. I do see a number with amputations, particularly of feet and lower legs.  

 

So, take it seriously, but don't live in paranoia.  You can manage this.  First, get educated about it, and second follow through and take it seriously.  If you do, you'll be fine.  

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Gm Global

Although liquid formula diets are increasingly recommended for remission of diabetes, real food diets can be enough for less extreme weight loss. Also it’s necessary to resume a food-based diet after a period on formula diets.

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