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Is Diabetes reversible...

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preventive health

Hello friend ,

i can understand your point of concern. Firstly i suggest you don't get it as huge problem it is just a health condition if you take proper health care you will surely get the control on it and able to live normal life. some of the healthy changes you can made your life like

1. Be active

2. Get balanced diet

3. Go for regular medical checkup it will track your health condition at proper time

4. Keep in touch with your doctor

5. Quit bad habits like smoking and alcohol

Follow these tips and get the good control on your diabetes.

BE HEALTHY BE HAPPY..!!:)

 

 

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Meredith Loring

The definition of 'diabetes reversal' is not agreed on at this point- up until a year ago the ADA said type 2 was 'chronic and irreversible' on their website!  We think that those with chronic high BG and chronic high insulin are carbohydrate intolerant, but that type 2 can be reversed. Dr. Sarah Hallberg has a video on how this is possible, and what it means- also with a science-based approach to nutrition for those who are carbohydrate intolerant. This video is on the Virta website, but doesn't have ads or anything on it. Hope it's helpful!

 

Reversing diabetes with nutritional ketosis

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Fraser

To me this is an ad. 

Just because I was curious, I joined a group of runners that saythey are sponsered or connected to Vitra (.?)

 the bottom line. As many of us here do, I eat a LCHF diet, now I eat between 30 to 50 carbs a day

, I run 3 times a week,  I am 72,. My dx A1c was 12.0 it is now 5.6.  No medicationWhen I joined this group, I reviewed my situation with them.  Now they don't consider my diabetes reversed!!!!!!!!

why ? Because I am not following all of their rules on eating, and my ketone level is not high enough, and I need to loose 10 pounds. Really. ? my numbers sure are great though.   Did not seems they wanted any Individualisedof program. 

i am not saying they are terrible, or fake, I generally was eating that way before, so they could be great.

but I rebel at that fact they wanted to add another layer of goals and number counting, to my already extension diabetets control.

st least I consider my diabetes to be reversed.  And I have a Ketone meter now👍

 

 

 

 

Edited by Fraser

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meyery2k

My doctor once congratulated me on getting my numbers down to non-diabetic but, through observation, I am clearly insulin resistant.  If I eat something like a starch or a dessert made with sugar I still have an abnormal spike that takes a long time to come down.

 

Diabetes is not a disease but a clinical description so while I may not present with diabetes at present (the clinical symptom) the cause of insulin resistance is still present.

 

I should consider myself fortunate.  I can actually choose whether I am diabetic or not for now.  Many don't have that opportunity.

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Type 2 Fighter
On 6/12/2017 at 3:33 PM, Kit said:

I'm weird.  I've loved spinach since I was a little kid.  Even the canned stuff.  :D

 

 

I had had fresh spinach in cream source w onion, garlic, parm. cheese in the heavy cream. 

 

I now officially love spinach!

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Type 2 Fighter

I think many use “reverse” to mean they brought their condition to non diabetic measurements. 

 

These don’t claim “cured.”

 

the patient knows that he cannot return to SAD eating. 

 

i think “reverse” is a fair term to use.  

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PJ Lin

Of course, you can reverse DM2.

A good read to share. It is from Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology, better than those over-promised/under-delivered from TED:

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/10/151001130002.htm

and this one from University of Michigan:

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/11/161116131939.htm

These article tell a new concept about the root cause of type 2 diabetes.

These scientists’s idea is to reduce the cellular stress level in pancreatic beta cells and wait for the cells to reproduce themselves. Once you have regained your beta cell function, insulin resistance will no longer be an issue. Yes, that’s because more and more scientists have believed that insufficient beta cell function is the real root cause of DM2, not insulin resistance.

Several pharmaceutical companies have worked on stimulating ERAD as they described in the article. Although, the solution is still on the way, I hope the information can be a little helpful.

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dowling gram
25 minutes ago, PJ Lin said:

Of course, you can reverse DM2.

A good read to share. It is from Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology, better than those over-promised/under-delivered from TED:

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/10/151001130002.htm

and this one from University of Michigan:

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/11/161116131939.htm

These article tell a new concept about the root cause of type 2 diabetes.

These scientists’s idea is to reduce the cellular stress level in pancreatic beta cells and wait for the cells to reproduce themselves. Once you have regained your beta cell function, insulin resistance will no longer be an issue. Yes, that’s because more and more scientists have believed that insufficient beta cell function is the real root cause of DM2, not insulin resistance.

Several pharmaceutical companies have worked on stimulating ERAD as they described in the article. Although, the solution is still on the way, I hope the information can be a little helpful.

Sorry but diabetes is not reversible but you can control your blood glucose so you don't get the complications that go with diabetes. Nowhere in your link does it say it's reversible. It does mention stress and glycemic control. Yes stress will raise your blood glucose as will being sick. Glycemis control is mainly what we do here. Many of us have A1c's in the normal range but that's because we have control because of our diets but if we were to eat more carbs those A1C's would rise..

 

In short your A1C and daily testing may be in the normal range because of your lifestyle changes but you are not cured. Once a diabetic always a diabetic

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PJ Lin
4 minutes ago, dowling gram said:

Sorry but diabetes is not reversible but you can control your blood glucose so you don't get the complications that go with diabetes. Nowhere in your link does it say it's reversible. It does mention stress and glycemic control. Yes stress will raise your blood glucose as will being sick. Glycemis control is mainly what we do here. Many of us have A1c's in the normal range but that's because we have control because of our diets but if we were to eat more carbs those A1C's would rise..

 

In short your A1C and daily testing may be in the normal range because of your lifestyle changes but you are not cured. Once a diabetic always a diabetic

Thank you for your reply, but I have several things to say:

1. the "stress" I mentioned in the previous post is cellular stress, not our everyday stress. The cellular stress includes: ER (endoplasmic reticulum) stress, oxidative stress and inflammatory stress....these kill pancreatic beta cells.

2. in this link: https://www.medscape.org/viewarticle/588165 and I quote " The Lancet suggested that early intensive insulin therapy (insulin pump or multiple daily injections) for 3-5 weeks at the onset of type 2 DM led to clinical remission and arrested beta-cell function decline.[3] "

3. I agree with on this: DM2 is not reversible if use only currently available medications

4. I am a professor of biochemistry so as a researcher, I'd like to give people hope...of course, hope that is reachable (based on scientific evidence although not yet been used clinically.)

5. pardon me for giving one more link:   https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3168743/ (Reversal of type 2 diabetes: normalisation of beta cell function in association with decreased pancreas and liver triacylglycerol)

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meyery2k

I respectfully disagree as a person that is able to control diabetes with diet and exercise.  My doctor has referred to my condition as in remission which I agree.

 

In spite of my normal numbers, I am still insulin resistant and can easily prove that by eating starches or sugar.  My glucose will go up to 140 or 150 and then stay there for a few hours which is then sometimes followed by reactive hypoglycemia.

 

Everyone is different but that, at least, is my first hand experience.

 

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dowling gram
3 hours ago, PJ Lin said:

Thank you for your reply, but I have several things to say:

1. the "stress" I mentioned in the previous post is cellular stress, not our everyday stress. The cellular stress includes: ER (endoplasmic reticulum) stress, oxidative stress and inflammatory stress....these kill pancreatic beta cells.

2. in this link: https://www.medscape.org/viewarticle/588165 and I quote " The Lancet suggested that early intensive insulin therapy (insulin pump or multiple daily injections) for 3-5 weeks at the onset of type 2 DM led to clinical remission and arrested beta-cell function decline.[3] "

3. I agree with on this: DM2 is not reversible if use only currently available medications

4. I am a professor of biochemistry so as a researcher, I'd like to give people hope...of course, hope that is reachable (based on scientific evidence although not yet been used clinically.)

5. pardon me for giving one more link:   https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3168743/ (Reversal of type 2 diabetes: normalisation of beta cell function in association with decreased pancreas and liver triacylglycerol)

 

There's something fishy here. You say you are prediabetic. If this theory works then why aren't you on it and why are you here?

 

(based on scientific evidence although not yet been used clinically.)It seems to me this is only a theory and not proven to be true. This is just another useless study.  I'll believe it when I have proof that it works on humans!!!

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dowling gram
7 minutes ago, dowling gram said:

Lancet suggested that early intensive insulin therapy (insulin pump or multiple daily injections) for 3-5 weeks at the onset of type 2 DM led to clinical remission and arrested beta-cell function decline.[3] "

I don't believe this, I think it would do more harm than good.  Taking too  much insulin leads to hypoglycemia.

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PJ Lin
11 minutes ago, dowling gram said:

 

There's something fishy here. You say you are prediabetic. If this theory works then why aren't you on it and why are you here?

 

(based on scientific evidence although not yet been used clinically.)It seems to me this is only a theory and not proven to be true. This is just another useless study.  I'll believe it when I have proof that it works on humans!!!

Yes, I am leading a healthy lifestyle now...and I believe doing this will help me reverse.....from pre to normal.

It is totally OK not to believe what I said and I completely respect that. 

However, these studies give me reasons why leading a healthy life will help.........better metabolism, lower insulin resistance and less stress on my pancreas from exercising and good diets....it is harmless and gives me hope.

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