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Hailey

Transdermal Non-Invasive C02, anyone who have tried?

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Hailey

Hi!

 

I am doing my research about vaporized co2, I like the idea that there is a device that does the job that comes handy.

I am surprised that 3 of my co-workers are under that kind of medication and they gave me positive reviews. Is there someone here that tried doxyva? (you may google it because im not sure if posting links are allowed)

As per review on their website, it really does a great job as it doesnt focus on one health issue but more on total wellness.

I would love to hear from you, tell me what do you think.

 

Thanks!

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Jon Gile

Hailey,

 

I have been using this mode for months now and know individuals who have cut their usage of medications in half. In fact, diabetes, sleep deprivation, hypertension, and neuropathy are four of the conditions that are managed using this therapy in a local office in My town! They track and measure your blood glucose levels so people who are diabetic can measure the impact themselves! We live in a society that is sceptical of everything but unwilling to do the work necessary to find solutions that exist. Please keep me up-to-date on your progress and I will do the same -the first thing I noticed was that I was able to sleep after years of sleep deprivation...

 

JG

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OneEye

We get someone coming through here every few weeks trying to hawk this device. I'm of the mind that Jon Gile and Hailey have adjoining cubicles. ;)

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JohnSchroeder

Yeah, this is absolutely absurd.  I don't know if Jon Gile and Hailey have adjoining cubes....  if they had left an affiliate link or something then yes.

 

But this just screams snake oil.

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Coravh

Hmm. Let's look at credibility. One post each. Both Pre-D.  And no other posts about their D management. Things that make you go "hmmmmm"

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Jon Gile

John/Corvah,

 

May I ask you each 2 questions? Do either one of you believe (theoretically) that the ability to consistently and measurably increase blood blow where it is needed most can help manage the progression of disease states, symptoms, and the need for medication? Remember I put in the qualifier "theoretically....". Bear with me, I understand you think this is a joke, but what if this actually does exactly what it says, changes can be measured, and people who use it at home report the benefits daily?

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adiantum

snake oil?  I'm not sure... I just expelled  Co2 when splitting firewood this morning &  I feel wonderful already.

 

My BG has even lessened.. I might go do it again .

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Coravh

Jon, while diabetes complications are significantly vascular in nature, I've never read any studies that suggest that improving blood flow in and of itself affects diabetes in any way. The development of T2 is not blood flow related, and neither is T1. Obviously exercise will both improve blood flow and bg numbers, but those are separate things. Simply adding any sort of supplement to improve flow has not been shown to lower bg.

 

Show me some valid studies and I will take you more seriously. Something peer reviewed with a decent sample size, reasonable placebos, and properly controlled for other things that might affect bgs. And repeatable.

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Jon Gile

C,

 

I appreciate your feedback and look forward to being able to meet your request (officially) soon...I am a believer but I also understand the necessity of being able to get the same results consistently, with measure and control.

Thanks,

JG

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JohnSchroeder

John/Corvah,

 

May I ask you each 2 questions? Do either one of you believe (theoretically) that the ability to consistently and measurably increase blood blow where it is needed most can help manage the progression of disease states, symptoms, and the need for medication? Remember I put in the qualifier "theoretically....". Bear with me, I understand you think this is a joke, but what if this actually does exactly what it says, changes can be measured, and people who use it at home report the benefits daily?

 

 

Again, its not going to do a thing for your diabetes.  For that you need to control your blood sugars.  It may well help the body heal chronic wounds through increased blood flow.  But it does nothing for the cause of those chronic wounds, at least in the case of diabetes.

 

Complete speculation now... but if the cause of neuropathy and poor healing in diabetics is having too much sugar in the blood, would increasing blood flow help or harm?  The first step is to reduce your blood sugars, then you could consider something like this as a possible treatment.

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15866797

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macksvicky

snake oil?  I'm not sure... I just expelled  Co2 when splitting firewood this morning &  I feel wonderful already.

 

My BG has even lessened.. I might go do it again .

Hahaha  Too funny.

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OneEye

This device uses what's called the (Bohr & Haldane effect). In essence it forces carbon dioxide into the blood to create more oxygen in a rebound effect. More oxygen...better metabolism (theoretically). It does this with what's called transdermal infusion for 5 minutes, once a day. Where does the CO2 come from? Glad you asked. You buy the CO2 from them (for the rest of your life). Sound familiar?

 

Honestly? You want more oxygen in your blood for 5 minutes a day? Hold you breath for 3 minutes and then hyperventilate. :blink:

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Jon Gile

In your critique you failed to mention that the effect derived from this five minute application lasts several hours-and in fact peaks an hour after the application itself before plateauing. It is true-You do have to stay on the cartridges forever to maintain and induce the effect, but dosage can be modified to only a couple cartridges a week as maintenance-and that long-term investment in Health becomes even more valuable in comparison to what patients experience now. Historically, I don't know of any medication ever administered that had the expanse of its efficacy attached to a single dose...

J

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Coravh

In your critique you failed to mention that the effect derived from this five minute application lasts several hours-and in fact peaks an hour after the application itself before plateauing. It is true-You do have to stay on the cartridges forever to maintain and induce the effect, but dosage can be modified to only a couple cartridges a week as maintenance-and that long-term investment in Health becomes even more valuable in comparison to what patients experience now. Historically, I don't know of any medication ever administered that had the expanse of its efficacy attached to a single dose...

J

Still waiting for a study or two. Don't expect me to just believe you. And don't expect me to do all the work if you want to be proven correct

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Hailey

We get someone coming through here every few weeks trying to hawk this device. I'm of the mind that Jon Gile and Hailey have adjoining cubicles. ;)

I don't even know one person here hahaha!

Im just curious because like you said there are reviews and advocates of the product, I am not one of them.. not yet because I am just doing a research and if it does something good then why not be an advocate so you can help others? hmm have a wonderful day!

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Coravh

I don't even know one person here hahaha!

Im just curious because like you said there are reviews and advocates of the product, I am not one of them.. not yet because I am just doing a research and if it does something good then why not be an advocate so you can help others? hmm have a wonderful day!

You 100% cannot trust reviews on the website of someone trying to sell you something. It needs to be independant backed by science.

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georgepds

Again, its not going to do a thing for your diabetes.  For that you need to control your blood sugars.  .....

 

Complete speculation now... but if the cause of neuropathy and poor healing in diabetics is having too much sugar in the blood, would increasing blood flow help or harm?  The first step is to reduce your blood sugars, then you could consider something like this as a possible treatment.

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15866797

 

Not to defend snake oil... but one of the aspects of neuropathy is nerve bundle degeneration due to lack of blood flow in the capillaries

 

It surprised me, until I read about it I had no idea nerve bundles were laced with capillaries

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georgepds

Some suggest just such an effect

 

 

 

"This review examines the evidence of capillary dysfunction in diabetic neuropathy, and whether the observed relation between endoneurial blood flow and nerve function is consistent with increasingly disturbed capillary flow patterns. The analysis suggests testable relations between capillary dysfunction, tissue hypoxia, aldose reductase activity, oxidative stress, tissue inflammation and glucose clearance from blood.

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4351434/

 

"the progressive capillary dysfunction of the systemic microcirculation caused by type 2 diabetes risk factors is likely to reduce glucose tolerance, and hence contribute to what we define as type 2 diabetes. We therefore suggest that type 2 diabetes complications represent the progression of systemic capillary dysfunction from more moderate levels already present when type 2 diabetes is diagnosed.

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Coravh

Some suggest just such an effect

 

 

 

"This review examines the evidence of capillary dysfunction in diabetic neuropathy, and whether the observed relation between endoneurial blood flow and nerve function is consistent with increasingly disturbed capillary flow patterns. The analysis suggests testable relations between capillary dysfunction, tissue hypoxia, aldose reductase activity, oxidative stress, tissue inflammation and glucose clearance from blood.

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4351434/

 

"the progressive capillary dysfunction of the systemic microcirculation caused by type 2 diabetes risk factors is likely to reduce glucose tolerance, and hence contribute to what we define as type 2 diabetes. We therefore suggest that type 2 diabetes complications represent the progression of systemic capillary dysfunction from more moderate levels already present when type 2 diabetes is diagnosed.

 

These statements are the scientists equivalent of "Hmmmmmm, maybe someone should test to see if it's true" and cannot be taken as fact, and then another treatment (like this CO2 stuff) be extrapolated. Unless there is a study that actually shows that the CO2 can lower bgs, then it's doubtful. This article simply wonders if improved blood flow would affect glucose tolerance.

 

And because it is just an assumption, it can in no way be taken as proof of a treatment that wasn't tested in the article. The article is simply about peripheral neuropathy, and it's been known for years that this complication is microvascular in nature and improved blood flow helps. They were not looking int glucose issues. And then there is this in the conclusion where they want people to look into it. So there is no way you can say a treatment like mentioned above works and try to prove it by this article when all they say is that more study is needed.

 

The proposed hypothesis that capillary dysfunction causes diabetic neuropathy (and some degree of glucose intolerance) gives rise to a range of predictions that lend themselves to further scrutiny in animal experiments, epidemiological studies and clinical trials.

 

And they're admitting that it needs to be done in animals first. Wanna be a guinea pig?

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Jon Gile

Yes, I am willing and your differentiation between impacting complications/symptoms of disease and disease state itself (Neuropathy/Diabetes) noted.

 

Thanks,

JG

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