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Todd G.

Random Thoughts On Fixing Everything

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Todd G.

I have put in considerable thought recently about my general health, due largely to having been sent home from the hospital after resolving a major infection, but with several other new or newly surfaced issues that were completely untreated.

 

Here's my thinking as it stands now: I would not accept any diagnosis that involves long term treatment without a super comprehensive blood test that includes all organ function indicators, complete hormone panel, vitamin and mineral panel and anything else that can be thrown in.

 

I was sent home (to use an automotive analogy) with my engine repaired, but with a broken transmission and an empty fuel tank. The fact that there were several abnormalities in my blood work was never mentioned, and almost led to extreme additional treatment.

 

I went to a private lab and had additional tests run that showed MAJOR vitamin deficiency in several important areas, and some other issues which had not existed prior to this episode with infection.

 

Less than $300 in out of pocket expenses saved me from thousands of dollars and many hours of what would have been useless, dangerous treatment.

 

I would not consent to serious, invasive treatment going forward unless/until all my major blood chemicals were "in range", unless the physician wanted treatment to address something out of range and could explain why proposed treatment would be successful.

 

There's an old saying about "when the only tool you have is a hammer, every problem you see is a nail" that I think applies here. It's easier and faster for a doctor to pick up a prescription pad and send you on your way than to figure out why you have a problem in the first place.

 

I may be late to the party, but I recently discovered what the designation D.O. means as opposed to M.D. You'all should google it and consider the different perspective one of these practitioners might bring to your situation.

 

Just thinking out loud here folks.......

 

http://doctorsthatdo.org/difference

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funkynassau

I was misdiagnosed twice and almost died both times.  Truly horrifying to put it mildly.  I'm really lucky to be here today.  So, I have just about zero faith in doctors and definitely am my own best advocate for my health.  I avoid doctors at all costs.  I had the most awesome chiropractor who was also a naturopath and homeopath and that man helped me keep myself humming along nicely for many years.  I moved too far away to see him but I have found another chiropractor who is sort of on the same wavelength and my previous one.  I've learned to question anything a doctor tells me and pound on the desk until I get answers that make sense and I dont put up with BS at all from the medical profession.  Of course if I break my leg etc I would go to a doctor but i'd be so cautious about anything they told me.  I've become quite the skeptic.

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Fraser

My primary care is a D.O. She great, not she knows all the answers, but she listens to alll my questions then makes an holistic plan.

The latest was I was having hip pain and not happy with mu running. So her reactionwas that since my fall I was not sitting as straight and tall, and not as flexible.. As to the hip pain, change my sleep position. The rest, it us time to work on strength again, but no pills.

And she scheduled me with a physical therapist, to work on it all

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Fraser

I forgot to add, on my diabetes management, I tell her what I am doing, she check my labs, and says your doing great, just continue.

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dowling gram

I don't have a D.O. and I don't think I need one. Long ago I discovered that doctors don't know everything and they are not God. This revelation came after a bout with a sulfa allergy. A dumb doctor told me I couldn't be allergic because it wasn't penicillin.

 

Since that time  I never take a doctors diagnoses with out proof and research on my part. I am an advocate for my own health and I like it that way. After all mistakes happen and even a caring, knowledgeable doctor can make them so my double checking can't hurt and may be responsible for catching them.

 

When I was diagnosed with severe Osteoporosis everyone said I was taking too much Calcium and would end up with kidney stones.I had done my research and I wasn't going overboard, just taking the full dose of pills and discounting the calcium in my food. My reasoning was that if my bones were crying out for Calcium  my body would direct it to where it was most needed. Well I was right and the medical profession was wrong or else were erring on the side of caution. Never-the- less in less than a year my bones were in the normal range. I did the same thing when my lab test came back with high blood sugar and that led me here. I will continue in the same vein no matter what crops up.

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Kit

I've had similar bad luck with doctors in the past.  After 5 years of going in both extreme abdominal and back pain, and being sent home with any nausea meds with instructions to talk to a Gyn for my "lady" problems, it was a relief when one finally though this wasn't right and delved into things further.

 

You know, this translates into other industries.  IT\Tech support, basically anything dealing with solving problems for end users.  So many people focus on the easy fix.  How do we stop X from happening.  Some people approach it as solving that small problem.  A good tech, however, will approach it as "why is X happening in the first place".  Hunting donw the true cause of the issue is so very important.

 

The first may gave a quick temp fix that might last a little while until the actual problem starts to get worse.  The second may take longer, but should actually solve the issue.  I have found that a vast majority of people want the 1st and not the second.  Both techs and end users.  Drives me a little batty.  :)

 

But yes, it really puts me off when I mention a problem to a doctor and instead of asking me questions to understand what it going on better, or trying to help determine the source of the issue, they get ready to write prescriptions.

 

Prescriptions are easy fixes.  There's no effort involved.  Pop this pill and see me again in 2 weeks.  If you have side affects, we'll give give you another med to counter those side effects.

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meyery2k

Kit - Very insightful post.  I troubleshoot for a living in IT as well.  We have one customer that just gets horrible service from their provider.  Their circuit keeps going down and we have to go to site many times to demonstrate that it is not our equipment.

 

Just the other day, the customer called.  My dispatcher just wanted to have them call the provider and not have us deal with it.  I argued that, no, we have to visit the site. We need to treat every call as a new call.  While you can take into consideration past calls and factor them in, you cannot use those to come to the same conclusion every time.

 

Sure enough, we visited the site and found the circuit was re-wired and there was equipment connected to our equipment which necessitated making some adjustments to our equipment.

 

I definitely fall into the determining why something happens camp vs. reacting to the observed end result and dealing with it.

 

In my troubleshooting book, the dice have no memory.

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Kit

You also mention the issue of assumptions.  You get a lot of issues dealing with a certain thing.  So a customer contacts and in a vague way it sounds siliar.  I see a lot of techs make the assumption that its the same thing.  Ask a few questions though, take a moment to gather a little more info, and you realize that it is not.  And not only might it not be the case, but treating it as the first could actually make the situation worse.

 

Funny how the same concepts transfer so well to different fields.

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Todd G.

To elaborate a little further, most people here know that a probable side effect of metformin is low B12. But I bet few doctors could state that fact from memory, or consider it important enough to consider in making a diagnosis.

 

Well, I've had numbness in my feet for years. Since far before any issues with blood sugar. It was assumed it was due to an accident I was in back in 1982 where my feet were injured. When I started having BG issues my numbness seemed to worsen and the doctors response was to say it was nuropathy. It just seemed strange to me that it would vary from week to week in its severity.

 

Anyway, as a consequence of my recent adventure and bloodwork, I found that my B12 levels were near zero. I take a multi vitamin most days, but my levels were depleted to a degree that no oral dosage was ever going to remedy. I started larger oral doses and began B12/B-complex injections. Now that my bloodwork shows much better numbers, much of the numbness has subsided.

 

So I don't think I've found some magic solution, but I just think applying a KISS approach to one's personal health is not all bad. Fix the easy stuff and maybe the big stuff gets fixed along the way.

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