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rollinstarz

Disappointed in a1c drop after 6 months

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rollinstarz

Hi All:

 

In January of 2017, I was diagnosed pre-diabetic which totally freaked me out.

Since then, I have been on a mission to make a complete lifestyle change in terms of diet and exercise. 

Basically, I've always exercised on and off since college (early 2000s) but ever since I was a child, candy (aka sugar) was all i loved to consume. As i got older, the switch from straight up candy to cookies, cakes , confections, and carbs took over... 

Well, I decided to take this pre-diagnosis seriously and i have been exercising daily and radically changing my diet to whole unprocessed ingredients and doing the best i can to eliminate all sorts of simple sugars...

 

I recently had my a1c levels checked again, and even with the diet change and daily exercise (at least 30min of cardio followed by about 45min of pilates and strengthening) ... it only decreased a mere 0.3 points!!!!!!!!!!!

 

I know its a good thing that it did not increase, but i feel the hard work and dedication ive put in should have yielded a higher decrease...

 

I need some encouragement. :(

 

Thanks 

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Carol_42

Hi and welcome to the group.  What was your latest A1c number?  

 

A good many of us at this group are dedicated Keto diet enthusiasts.  Keto is low carbs and high fat (LCHF).  A place to start is to eliminate certain foods from your diet: grains (rice, breads/cereals), potatoes, pasta, and most high carb fruits and vegetables.  It's also important to test your daily blood glucose using a glucometer.  Are you testing every day?

 

There are so many great people here who are willing to help you and answer questions.  So ask away ...

CB

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LaRue

Eliminating simple sugars, like the obvious ones in candy, may very well not be enough.

 

Unprocessed foods = good. Unprocessed grains/carbs = not so good.

 

What was your A1C before....and now?

 

You'll find many people here (including me) follow a very low carb, high fat diet.

 

That means no grains, no veg that grows below the ground, little or no fruit except olives and avocados.

 

Can you list a typical days diet?

 

 

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Kit

Hi, welcome to the group.  :)

 

If you don't have one already, its time to get yourself a meter.  Testing yourself before and a couple hours after meals can help you hunt down where those higher numbers are coming in.

 

We often refer to this as eating to your meter.  Testing before and after a meal helps you to determine what foods your body reacts well to and which foods not so much.  This will allow you to fine tune your diet changes more effectively.

 

If your doctor won't give you a prescription for strips, Walmart sells the ReliOn Prime.  The strips are $9 for 50 and way less expensive than my insurance copay on the approved meter and strip brand.

 

Setting target goals are helpful.

 

For an A1C of under 6 generally

Fasting and pre meals below 100

1 hour after a meal under 140

2 hours after a meal under 120

 

My personal goals are to be back under 100 by 2 hours after a meal as my goal is to be in the low 5s at the highest.

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meyery2k

rollinstarz - What the public perceives as a low carb diet and the reality of what it is are very far apart.

 

I find that to maintain good control I must avoid bread, rice, pasta, grains, and root vegetables.  Through eating to my meter I have found a few items that I can tolerate like potatoes in small quantities but I have found it much easier to just stick with what I know.

 

While, at first, it was daunting because I didn't know what to eat, I adapted and eat better quality food than ever.  Today for lunch I found a beautiful little pepper steak in the must sell today section of the store.  I plan to fry that up in some olive oil.  Reserving the oil and steak juices, I will saute up some mushrooms with a little garlic and onion.  Salad with lettuce, cucumber and ranch dressing.  Debating on a few pork rinds or a slice of Havarti cheese.

 

Dessert will be some no sugar added ice cream.

 

Nothing wrong with this meal lol...

 

To start, I had to log my food.  This was to lose weight and to try to figure out how diabetes worked.  If you share some of the data here we will help you out.  Sadly, diabetes is more than staying away from just sugar.

 

Ditto on the advice to get a meter and test, test, test.  Once you learn how it all works for you, you will not have to test so frequently.

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funkynassau

My doctor was basically an idiot but he did say one important thing to me - you didnt get like this overnight and you won't get better overnight.

I know it's frustrating to try so hard and not make much head way, but it can take longer than you want to get the results you want.  So hang in there, read all you can here, post when you like.  You will get there!

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Dave_KC

The starting point is important to keep in mind here.  A .3 drop isn't necessarily bad, depending on the starting point.  

 

As others have pointed out, the range of non-diabetic is 4.0 to 6.0, and many consider pre-diabetic to be 6.1 to 6.5.  Obviously getting it down is crucial.  I was diagnosed with diabetes at 12.6, and through radical change (low carb, higher fat), I dropped radically in 6 months to 5.0 and by 9 months at 4.7.  I do know I have to be very careful what I eat, and it absolutely is a training exercise.  You can do it, but it won't be overnight.  

 

So yeah, what's the starting point?  That'll help give perspective.  

 

 

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