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Rad Warrier

Solar Eclipse in the Pacific Northwest

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Rad Warrier

Today's solar eclipse in the Pacific North West was partial but 92% of sun got eclipsed. We watched the eclipse through the "eclipse glasses" purchased from the grocery store for around $2. Through it we could see the eclipse beautifully. The sun appeared like a very thin crescent moon at around 10:20 AM. The ambient sunlight took on a weird glow somewhat like that of the evening time but not quite like it. It was a wonderful experience.

I remember watching a partial eclipse in India in my boyhood through a piece of broken glass "smoked" with a candle. Also remember seeing the reflection of the eclipsed sun in cow dung water collected in a wide mouthed vessel.


Regards,
Rad

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Kit

It was quite a sight. 

 

We delayed the Monday morning engineering meeting so we could all go outside and gawk. :)

 

I posted a picture a coworker of mine managed to get in the Daily Chat thread. 

 

Did you notice the shadows were much sharper as well. And yes, the ambient light was odd as well. 

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OneEye

I'm in Oroville, CA. 83% totality. It's darker today with cloud cover than it was yesterday. I think...unless you're watching a "full totality" it's much ado about nuthin'.

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NoraWI

It was overcast all day here in southwest Wisconsin. I went out to check on cattle at about the time of the eclipse and couldn't understand why it was dark enough to storm but was not raining. :wub:

Then the cloud cover dissipated and the sun came out. I'd forgotten about the eclipse.

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Hammer
2 hours ago, OneEye said:

I'm in Oroville, CA. 83% totality. It's darker today with cloud cover than it was yesterday. I think...unless you're watching a "full totality" it's much ado about nuthin'.

I agree with OneEye.  If you didn't have full totality, it wasn't worth watching.  When we've had these eclipses years ago, I tried to watch them, but all it amounted to, was like having the sun partially blocked by a cloud....it wasn't worth watching.  I had zero interest in watching yesterday's solar eclipse, since, to me, it was no big deal.  I have a welding shield that has the proper lens in it that would be good for watching a solar eclipse, but I didn't bother to take it out, since I knew that the eclipse, from where I live, would be a non-event.  I spent yesterday, taking my car to the dealership to have them do the emission modifications to my VW, due to the lawsuit settlement between VW and the government.  That took 8 hours, so, even if I wanted to watch the eclipse, I wasn't available to do so anyway.

 

I know that a lot of people were excited about it, just like I was years ago, but when nothing exciting happens, you lose interest, like I have.  Oh, and no, using a smoked piece of glass is NOT a good way to watch a solar eclipse, since it offers no UV protection and could damage your eyes.

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adiantum

I read the eclipse was over Washington & that amused me...'the lights were out & no-one was home'.

Seeing it on TV had me wondering if it was somehow connected to peoples voice boxes as every viewing   I could hear high pitched Woo's .

 

I never think to utter a sound when this universe puts on a spectacular show for me.

Years  ago I also used a welders  shield when watching Venus transit the sun & that was awesome (without a woo) 

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Dave_KC

At my home, we were fully eclipsed, and my kids got to see it at their school.  I had to go southeast a couple of hours, and we were only in a partial eclipse.  

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OneEye

I watched a program on TV last night about the eclipse. I think, with the naked eye and the proper lens, watching the eclipse is novel...but I think I would be more moved by my surroundings going twilight like maybe the Mayans or the Incas did. It showed images that were taken with powerful telescopes of the sun and its corona...in my opinion...the real show. 

 

Funny story. When I was a kid we lived on Castro St. in San Francisco just across the street from the Franklin hospital. My father, interested in the heavens and astronomy, took it upon himself to design a 6-foot cassegrain telescope in the basement out of aluminum tubing and ½-inch aluminum plate. A cassegrain telescope has two mirrors and lenses. A large mirror at the bottom of the telescope and another, smaller, reflective mirror at the top which sends the light back through a hole in the center of the larger mirror into lenses.

 

First he built the telescope's framing, then the frame structure it would sit on, then a motorized unit so he could take time-lapsed 35mm photos. That took him 2 years. Then he bought the mirrors. Two, 12 inch and two 6 inch. Two of each so he could grind them himself. To grind these mirrors he bought maybe 10 different grinding grits. He would place one mirror on a 50-gallon drum, sprinkle grit and water on it...then place the other mirror on top of that. Then he would move one mirror across the other 25 times, stop, move a foot to his side and then do the same thing 25 more times going rouns and rpound the drum for hours. No idea how he knew when to change to a finer grit.

 

When the first large mirror was finished...about a year later...he sent it out to have the hole drilled in the center and to have it silverized. They broke the mirror drilling the hole. Skip to 2 years later. The telescope mount is poured in concrete out in the backyard. Our 25-year old palm tree in the middle of the yard is cut down. Oh, look...now all the neighbors from the apartment house behind us can watch us. The first night my father dials in the moon, turns the electrics on and sets the exposure on the camera. Does this for a couple weeks. Takes the film down to Safeway...and a week later it's back.

 

All of the images are blurred. He figures it's the motor following the moon during the exposures. He redesigns the motor and hydraulically insulates it. Does squat. Thinks maybe it's wind; builds an enclosure around it. Still...nuthin'. He decides to sit up all night with the telescope and see if maybe he can tell what's doing this. The next morning we see him out in the back yard with a pick axe digging up the concrete support with the telescope lying off the the side of him. What the what?! "What are you doing, Jimmy?" asks my mother. "Help me load this into the trunk of the Pontiac, Aline!" he says to my mother. They drive out to the San Francisco Amateur Astronomers, who he help found in 1952, and donates it.

 

What the vibration was...was the 24 Divisadero city buses that passed in front of the house every 15 minutes all night. After that...he took up designing and making grandfather clocks. He made one for each of his kids. None of them ever kept the right time. :huh:

 

 

 

 

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meyery2k

One Eye- Love it.  At least he kept busy and seemed to love what he was doing.  That is living to your fullest, no?

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OneEye
4 minutes ago, meyery2k said:

One Eye- Love it.  At least he kept busy and seemed to love what he was doing.  That is living to your fullest, no?

 

It is, I suppose. Would have liked to have spent more time with him.

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Moonpie

Living a bit North, of one eye, we had 86% eclipse & some old welder glass to look at it, we enjoyed it very much, from our deck, but I am also the type who goes out looking for meteors & comets when they are predicted. I love astronomical events.

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OneEye

I also like watching meteors and comets in the night sky. Of course, having just one eye...I can't really tell how close they are! ;)

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stevenal
On ‎8‎/‎25‎/‎2017 at 3:26 PM, OneEye said:

Were going to file this under 'Who Needs Glasses...I'm Donald Trump!"

 

trump2.jpg

I was expecting the Secret Service to tackle him.

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