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Cbar425

Dr won't listen to me!! Please help any advice

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Cbar425

Hello, I am new to this site and I would like to ask for some insight. Over the last few months I've been experiencing many symptoms of diabetes. I'm 21 and type 1 runs in my family.

 

So I've had several blood tests done and my fasting blood glucose was 126. My dr never called me and never set up a follow up to do a second test. So I took matters in my own hands and requested a follow up blood test. My Dr basically rolled her eyes at me and told me I shouldn't be worried since I'm "thin" and "look healthy". 

 

That day i had my urine tested for something unrelated and the next day I receive my test result by email and i see on there that I have 80mg of Ketones in my urine. To my understanding ketones in urine isn't good and 80mg is a high number. Once again my Dr never mentioned the ketones.

 

I feel so frustrated I know something is wrong I don't feel right and I haven't for a while now. What do you guys think about all of this? I appreciate any input 

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Dave_KC

I would start with getting your A1c number.  That is the key number for telling where your numbers are.  

 

There's a significant difference between type 1 and type 2 though.  Type 1 your body stops making insulin.  Type 2, your body is resistant to the affects of insulin, and may also have some production issues.  

 

An A1c below 6.0 is not diabetic.

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notme

Buy a cheap meter.  Do a couple of fasting tests in the morning and do some testing two to three hours after a big meal.   It will give you a fairly good idea.   Find a new doctor if you don’t like the results.   

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Dave_KC
12 minutes ago, notme said:

Buy a cheap meter.  Do a couple of fasting tests in the morning and do some testing two to three hours after a big meal.   It will give you a fairly good idea.   Find a new doctor if you don’t like the results.   

 

Cheap meter is a great choice.  ReliOn at Walmart is quite inexpensive.  

 

If a Doctor won't listen, and won't work with you, get a different doctor, couldn't agree more. 

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xMenace

I show fairly high ketones daily with normal BGs. Your BG was nothing to be concerned with, so the ketones aren't either. What is your diet like? If you low-carb, then ketones is a non-issue. If you high-carb, it might be. Get an A1C test.

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JohnSchroeder

It's not bad no.  Non-diabetics can hit that after meals or eating lots of carbs.  If you were in danger it would be 200+  Likely 300+.  I'm perfectly happy at 126.

If you are still concerned get a relion meter from Walmart and a one box of strips.  Just test yourself after meals, before bed, when you get up.  probably the easiest method.

After that would be an A1C test like has been said.

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Cbar425

For someone who isn't diabetic I thought fasting blood sugar of 126 is high my blood test indicated I should have another test done? 

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Kit

I personally would never consider 126 as acceptable as fasting level as a diabetic.

Normal fasting blood glucose levels for non diabetics is under 100 and more usually somewhere in the 80s.  Anyone who is running consistently higher is having a problem of one sort or another.

 

I agree with what a few others said.  Grab a cheap meter.  Check your fastings, before meals and 2 hours after.  Keep records.  This way you have more information to present to your doctor.  Or perhaps another doctor.  Any doctor who refuses to listen to your concerns isn't a doctor who is willing to work with you until you hit emergency levels.

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Cbar425

Thanks for the advice Kit, thank you everyone for all your help! I asked my Dr to refer me to an Endo and she did I'm just waiting to hear from them. Im also gonna get a cheap meter. 

 

This may sound silly but I've never tested myself before with a meter so I'm pretty lost on the process, is there multiple supplies I need? Or just the meter and strips?

 

thanks again everyone

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Kit

I'm glad to hear that you're getting to see a specialist.  With the mix of your family history and your age, it should be enough with elevated fasting and ketones to raise some warning flags that something is going on.

 

Yes, in order to test your BG levels, there are a few different things you will need.

1)  The meter itself

2)  A lancing device and lancets to go with it

3)  Strips

 

Now if you are diagnosed as diabetic, your insurance company will pay for these supplies.  However, they will usually only pay for one specific type and with a limited number of strips depending on your needs (and they can be stingy at times).  However that will mean you have to wait until your endo appointment.

 

Now when we talk about cheap meters, we're actually talking about cheap strips.  Many companies almost give the meters away if it means you're stuck using their strips which can often cost an arm and a leg.

 

I personally use the ReliOn Prime from Walmart.

The meter itself is normally $17 (currently on same online for $9

A pack of test strips is $9 for 50 or $17.88 for 100.

Note:  ReliOn Prime strips can be utterly inconsistent in price at Amazon.  Anywhere from $16 for 100 to $50+.  I usually buy straight from Walmart.

 

I believe CVS also has a meter with strips of a comparable price point.

 

There are a very large number of lancing devices out there.  The one I prefer is the One Touch Delica.

I also prefer the 30 gauge lancets which go with this device.  Some prefer the 33, which are finer, but I have problems with them.  Lancets come in boxes of 100.  I change mine out about once a month.  A box of lancets will last for a very long time.

 

Basically you can kit up for about $50 depending on where you buy and how much.

 

If/when you get diagnosed you may end up changing, but most diabetics tend to have an extra meter/lancing device just in case of an emergency (lost, broken, etc).

 

Once you have everything you need, Youtube is usually a pretty good source for video tutorials on how to use it all.  You can also feel free to come back here and ask any questions you may have.

 

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Uff Da

And if you buy your meter and supplies at a Wal-Mart or in a drugstore rather than online, a pharmacist is usually happy to show you how to use it.

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Cbar425

Just thought I would update you guys, I called the endo and the earliest they can see me isn't til January 10!! They have me on the waiting list in case anything opens up :/

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Bar&In

Surely there is more than one endo in your area. If you don't want to wait that long, start to Google endos in your area and start calling them all. You'll have an appointment in no time and if you don't like them you can always switch but at least you'll get initial diagnosis and results. Good Luck. 

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1668880

That's a month early than mine Feb  12, 2018. But He is one of the top Endo's so It will be worth the wait. I have heard that there is also a type 1.5 but have no idea what that means. I am type 1 and 29 years ago there was only juvenile onset and Adult onset. Ok I quit being lazy and googled it https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/diabetes-resources/definitions/type-1-5-diabetes/ . And will paste it below for those who don't like clicking on links.

"

Type 1.5 Diabetes
Updated April 9, 2014
Published June 16, 2006

 

A form of diabetes sometimes called “double diabetes,” in which an adult has aspects of both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes.

Over the past three decades, diabetes researchers have gradually fine-tuned the classification of different underlying diseases that comprise diabetes. In the early 1970’s, they spoke of “juvenile-onset” and “adult-onset” diabetes to distinguish between two seemingly different forms of the disease based on when they tended to appear; however, sometimes the “juvenile” form showed up in adults. They later coined the terms “insulin-dependent” and “non-insulin-dependent” diabetes to distinguish between the two basic forms of the disease based on how they were treated rather than the age of onset. But this, too, was confusing because some people with non-insulin-dependent diabetes also used insulin. So scientists had to come up with yet another classification system.


In the late 1990’s, they began classifying the two major types of diabetes by their underlying metabolic problems and called them Type 1 and Type 2. Type 1 diabetes is characterized by autoimmune destruction of pancreatic beta cells (and the resulting production of little or no insulin), and the presence of certain autoantibodies against insulin or other components of the insulin-producing system such as glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), tyrosine phosphatase, and/or islet cells. It often develops in children (although it can occur at any age) and requires insulin treatment for survival. Type 2 diabetes is characterized by insulin resistance and beta-cell dysfunction, usually develops in adults (although it is now occurring with alarming frequency in children), does not show signs of autoimmune disease, and usually does not require insulin to maintain survival (at least in its early stages).

The medical professionals who study and treat diabetes noticed, however, that among the people who do not require insulin at diagnosis (most of whom were assumed to have Type 2 diabetes), a significant number showed autoantibodies, especially antibodies against islet cells and GAD. In other words, these people could be treated initially with diet therapy and oral medicines like people with Type 2 diabetes, but they also had an ongoing autoimmune process like people with Type 1 diabetes. The term “latent autoimmune diabetes of adults” (LADA) was originally applied to this subset of people with diabetes. It has also been dubbed “slow-progressing Type 1 diabetes,” and, in the late 1990’s, some researchers coined the term “Type 1.5 diabetes,” because it had features of both the major types.

Further study of these people who at least initially do not require insulin yet have autoantibodies has revealed some distinct variations, leading some researchers to subdivide those placed under the umbrella term LADA into three groups: Type 1–LADA, Type 1.5 or “double” diabetes, and Type 2 diabetes with autoantibodies. Under this scheme, people with Type 1–LADA are thought to have a more slowly progressing form of Type 1 diabetes. Like people with Type 1 diabetes, people with Type 1–LADA have autoantibodies and are usually not obese. Although they may initially be able to get by with diet therapy and oral diabetes medicines, they usually need to use insulin within about five years of diagnosis because of the destruction of their beta cells.

People with Type 1.5 diabetes are said to have “double” diabetes because they show both the autoimmune destruction of beta cells of Type 1 diabetes and the insulin resistance characteristic of Type 2 diabetes. People with Type 1.5 have autoantibodies and gradually lose their insulin-producing capability, requiring insulin within 5–10 years of diagnosis. As their insulin resistance suggests, many people with Type 1.5 diabetes are obese or overweight.

People in the third group are obese or overweight with insulin resistance like most people with Type 2 diabetes, and they also have autoantibodies. However, they still manage to produce insulin for more than five years after diagnosis and can continue to manage their diabetes with diet, exercise, and oral medicines. It is suspected that the autoimmunity in these people is very mild.

Some researchers suggest screening anyone newly diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes for GAD antibodies. In the United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS), most study subjects with Type 2 diabetes between 35 and 45 years old who tested positive for antibodies against both GAD and islet cells progressed rapidly to insulin dependency. Some researchers have also suggested that anyone who tests positive for GAD antibodies be screened for autoantibodies to thyroid and adrenal cells, because like people with Type 1 diabetes, people with Type 1.5 diabetes seem to be at higher risk of having other autoimmune diseases.

The jury is still out on the best way to treat Type 1.5 diabetes. Maintaining tight blood glucose control may help to slow the destruction of the beta cells (and delay insulin dependency) as well as reduce the risk of diabetic complications. A few small studies suggest that insulin therapy or insulin combined with rosiglitazone (brand name Avandia) may help to preserve beta-cell function, but these results need to be confirmed in larger trials. (Using insulin in combination with rosiglitazone may increase risks for people with heart failure.)"

I hope you don't have any of these and your doctor was correct but I don't like the way your doctor did not listen or explain why they felt that it was not an issue. So I say time for a new doctor because if they are not willing to listen to your concerns or explain their reasons for dismissing your concerns they are not needed because they do not care about you just the money they get from seeing you.

 

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