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Arnden

Question from newbie to basal injections

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Arnden

I received a free sample of Tresiba 200unit/ml from my endo. I was up to 45 clicks a day to get down to 169 fasting blood sugar when my insurance denied my refill prescription. So my endo prescribed Levemir 100 unit/ml and told me to keep going up two clicks a day until my fasting number is below 120. Third day on the Levemir and my number is almost 280 and seems to be rising each day. Is the 100 units/ml less strong? So would I need double? Does Levemir come in 200 unitS/ml? Thanks! I am calling the office in the morning, but I feel so ignorant.  Thanks for you time and any information you can teach me. 

Arnden

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adiantum

Amden I'm sorry you are in this position and very pleased that you will contact your doctor.

 

I dont use insulin and it seems those that do are off line just now. Please keep checking here as I'm sure someone will reply to you.

 

Are you type 1 or 2?

280/15 is extremely high...you have my empathy.

 

Lee

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macksvicky

Arnden. Ignorance is just not knowing something, stupidity is not asking for information. Glad you joined us and are asking questions. I have not used either of the insulins you mentioned, I use Lantus, which is still a long acting background insuin (basil)

 

The question I would ask before getting into any debate between whether any of them are especially better than another one is; what is your diet like, are you eating high carbohydrate foods and thinking the insulin will bring your numbers down? Basil insulin will help with those morning numbers BUT, lowering carb intake will go a long way with getting those numbers down and let you start lowering your dose of insulin.  The long acting basil insulin is just a background insulin and doesn't really help drop your blood sugar from eating high carb foods. It isn't designed to take care of high carb meals/snacks.

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meyery2k

I don't use insulin either but I have seen many posts suggests that limiting carbs helps you use less insulin which ends up being less expensive and, more importantly, introduces stability.

 

Apparently, while you can correct for carbs with a fast acting insulin, you can set up a roller coaster effect where you go low, then compensate for that by eating something sweet which sends you high, which you then try to correct with insulin and so on...  

 

As a Type 2, I try to avoid spikes too.  Eventually my glucose comes down but it takes a long time because I am insulin resistant.  When I eat foods that have minimal effect on my glucose, I have a much easier time living with this.

 

Welcome and, yes, if you would care to share some of your diet with us I am certain you will get some sound advice. ~ Mike

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JohnSchroeder

Hello and welcome.  The difference between 200U/ML and 100U/ML is a question of density.  10 units of insulin are the same dosage whether its U100 or U200, however with the U200 you are injecting half the volume.  The pens are manufactured so that we can use 'Units' universally as dosing whether you have U100 or U200.

 

Injecting 45 units of U100 is A LOT to inject at one time.  I'd question your diet as well.  Those are awfully high glucose numbers likely driven up by a diet high in carbs.  Cut down on the carbs and it's likely you can also cut down on the insulin you are injecting.

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Hammer

Arnden, I use both a basal insulin (Lantus) and a bolus insulin (Novolog), and it takes time to arrive at the correct doses for both types of insulin, and those correct doses are constantly changing.  I started out with Lantus, which is similar to Levemir, and I ended up with a dose of 156 units every night at 11pm.  As I ate a low carb diet, I lost weight, and my Lantus dose began to decrease.  At one point it had dropped to 48 units, but for some reason, my fasting glucose levels began to increase.  I try to keep my fasting glucose levels in the upper 60's to the upper 70's, but that's just my personal preference, you might want your fasting glucose levels to be higher.

 

When my fasting glucose levels reached the mid 90's and stayed there for several days, I increased my Lantus dose by one unit.  When that had no effect, I increased by another unit.  I did that until I had reached 64 units, and at that dosage, my glucose levels are now back where I want them to be.

 

I looked up Tresiba, and it seems to be the same as Levemir and Lantus, so I would think that switching from one to the other shouldn't matter.  If your fasting glucose levels are that high, then first, like the others have said, reduce your carb intake.(I try to eat 50 carbs a day.)  If lowering your carb intake doesn't lower your fasting glucose levels, then start increasing your Levemir dose until you get those fasting glucose levels to under 100 (not under 120....120 is too high for a fasting glucose level).

 

If you have questions, feel free to ask them here....that's what this forum is here for.

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