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Kimcon

Newly diagnosed IDDM type 1 17 son

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Kimcon

Hi all,  we are freaking out. Son-17 was diagnosed one week ago. Hospitalized in DKA. This sucks. Seeing endocrinologist for second time today and just don't know what to ask. Working on getting his glucose in check but it's still high.  What do I ask!! What do we do?! Guess I'm just trying to start making connections and seeing how active this forum is......I'm sad tired angry and he's all those and more 

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Coravh

The first thing you need to do is calm down. T1 will not stop your son from doing anything he wants with his life. If he doesn't achieve his goals, it's because he didn't work hard enough or doesn't have the aptitude. T1 will have had nothing to do with it (trust me, I've had it for over 50 years and it's never stopped me).

 

Next, get one or both of these books:

 

Think Like a Pancreas by Gary Scheiner

Using Insulin by Walsh

 

You can't lead a great life if you don't know how to take care of yourself. These 2 books are the 'bibles' on how to dose insulin. You can't just wait around for the doctor to tell you what to do. Remember, over the course of a year you will spend a total of about an hour or two with the doc, and about 60,000 hours taking care of yourself.

 

Taking care of T1 diabetes is not rocket science. It's grade school math, it's a pain in the rear, and it takes a bit of observation to learn what things and circumstances will raise or lower your blood sugar.

 

More importantly, is your son going to college and what does he want to take? That's going to be a lot more difficult than managing the T1. Just try not to worry, don't nag, and don't be the diet police (because nobody likes them and nobody listens).

 

Feel free to ask lots of questions.

 

 

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meyery2k

Kimcon - Welcome.  You will find a lot of great advice given freely here.  I am Type 2 and don't use insulin but, if I had to, this is the place I would go to.

 

Diabetes is not a show stopper by any means.  There are many here that have managed for years and they live active lives.  Personally, diabetes encouraged me to get back into shape and I am now into long distance bicycling.  ~ Mike

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Kimcon

Thanks all. We were are learning a lot.  It's actually interesting and hasn't really changed how we eat as we were already about fresh food and proper proportions. He's handling it great   Emotional days but that's to be expected and I am well aware that he really needs to be in the drivers seat.  It's his responsibility. My job is to fight with insurance. It's  amazing what they don't want to cover!! I'm actually on permanent hold with them right now. Geez.  Thanks for the support.  As we get closer to pumps Im sure I'll be back here looking for guidance and info   Have a good day all. 

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Coravh

Kimcon, I'm going to disagree with you a little bit. T1 is a hugely adult responsibility that many fully cooked adults can't handle. So always be there for him if/when he needs you. Get your own lancing device and stab your finger in solidarity if it makes him feel a bit less alone (don't waste a test strip). Learn to give injections and give him a shot if he just gets really tired of all the stuff he will have to deal with. I'll tell you honestly that it was the greatest boon to my mental health to know that if I had the flu or otherwise felt horrible, my Mom or Dad could pick up the slack for me and help take care of me. Don't baby him, but don't leave the entire responsibility in his hands either. Be a safety net for him. He'll thank you when he's in his 30s with a family of his own.

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Gladtobehere

I agree too.   But I must add that depending on the type of 17 year old your son is will make a HUGE difference in how you proceed.  My daughter was the worst teenager. It started around 13-14  and she is still angry at the world (But improving) in her early 30s.   And shes not diabetic.   But we all survived and I was in doubt of that for a while.

 

In any case after 40 years of T1, for me, the best advice I can give to a new member of the club and the support people is to learn about CARBOHYDRATEs.  CARBS are the biggest element in a diabetics future.  Eating the wrong ones is never good but not immediately life threatening.  But you need food to survive!      Eating the right carbs and in the right amounts along with protein and fats can really lead to good control. 

 

Of course you need to get the Insulin regime figured out but that is mainly what the doctors should do.   Just be aware that, like CARBS, not all doctors are created equal so never be afraid to get a second opinion if something doesn't feel right.  You can even come here to get an opinion.  In the years I have been coming here I don't recall being appalled by any opinion I have read. 

 

And just in case you need something extra to worry about I will tell you I was diagnosed at age 24.   Still able to leap tall building and catch bullets in my teeth. :-)  BUT I was in a very dark place for about 18 MONTHS.   That was my denial phase. Eventually I realized that I needed to pick a path and live rather than fight against the inevitable.   I am 65 this year with a few grand kids and a few years to go yet. 

 

So it is possible to live a fairly normal life provided you make smart choices.  I don't miss dessert at all.  Steak and a beer with a big salad on the side is hardly torture.

 

Take a few deep breaths, relax a little, and focus on the issue at hand.

 

Good luck.

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dowling gram

I'd like to suggest another book-- Dr. Bernstein's diabetes solution by Dr. Richard Bernstein

 

This Dr. was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes when he was a child. He is now well over 80 and has lived a full life with diabetes and has had no complications. It may ease your mind to know that it is possible with diet, exercise and insulin to live a long productive life

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