Jump to content
Diabetes forums
  • Welcome To Diabetes Forums!

    Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today to contribute and support the site.

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Captain Diabetes

Newly diagnosed Type 1.5

Pump or shot  

5 members have voted

  1. 1. Which is better the pump or the shot?

    • Pump
      4
    • Shot
      1


Recommended Posts

Captain Diabetes

Hi all,

 

Just found out the results of my GAD 65 test.  Scored over 250 so I started insulin shots last night.  My doctor told me that I will eventually need to start taking shots after meals, but at the time I was not thinking about questions.  How long does it usually take before I will go on shots after meals?  I realize it will be different for different people, I just want a general idea.  Also, at what time do I start considering whether or not to get on the pump?  It seems to me that from what I have read the pump will keep you better regulated all of the time instead of taking the shot after every meal.  Maybe that's wrong I don't know. Kinda a little bummed out to be honest.  I gotta keep it together for my Wife and Daughter. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
meyery2k

Captain - Now that you know what is going on, things can improve.  It is extremely important to determine what type of diabetes you have as the strategy to manage it is different.

 

You will get some good advice as posters with knowledge on the subject see your post.

 

For my part, I just want to reach out and say that diabetes is not a show stopper. ~ Mike

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
JohnSchroeder

Regarding pump versus shots, I don't think one is superior to the other.  People can and do make either one work and maintain their blood sugar just fine.  Some things to consider in making a choice... most important is probably cost in my opinion.  One might think aversity to needles should be considered, but honestly after you do a few shots and realize how little it actually hurts, that shouldn't be a concern at all, and certainly not a factor in choosing one over the other.

 

Personally, I did not want to use the pump when I was younger because I was very active and the idea of playing basketball or football with a device and a cord strapped to me sounded like a disaster waiting to happen.  Nowadays I just figure, if it ain't broke, don't fix it.  My A1Cs are pretty good, I'm paying remarkably little for my supplies and insulin and have largely eliminated the need for insurance.... I don't want to mess with any of that.

 

I deliberately did not vote.. I don't think its a fair question.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
SB_Krista

Everyone is different so hard to say how quick or fast your progression to meal time insulin will be. But, in my opinion, limiting carbs now might slow your progression. I've personally been a type 1.5 for 10 years and continue to only need night time long acting insulin. But, I do eat a very low carb diet so meal time insulin is really not needed.

I can't really weigh in on pump vs shots, sorry. Good luck adjusting!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
lada Lad

SB, it was so good to read that you've been Type 1.5 for so long!  I've been diagnosed for about 18 months.  Every time I see my GP or Endo they make a point of saying it will not last.  I've felt they were wrong but had no evidence, so thanks for sharing.  I, like so many others, was initially mis-diagnosed with T1 at a Diabetes mill run my health system...when nothing was working, I starting reading. I picked up a book called the Diabetic Athlete, and on page one I read that there was something called Type 1.5.  I dumped my original  "Doctor"  and found a practitioner that knew what they were doing.  When I had my first meeting with him the first thing he said was: "You've got type 1.5," and I knew I found the right person.
That said it's still been a long hard trip, with mis-steps along the way.  I was 66 when diagnosed.  I had an A1c of 10, and was very sick; I lost around 20 lbs in as many days. I'm now finally turning the corner.  I do not need insulin at this time; my glucose readings average around 95 and my A1c is 5.6, I'm on a low carb diet, no dairy, no gluten, no added sugar, or any inflammatory foods. Basically just simply prepared proteins and veggies and moderate daily exercise, boring but it works for me, I do whatever I can to not aggravate the anti-body cells.
What works for me is, since my pancreas is still functioning somewhat, is to: Eat breakfast like a king, lunch like a prince, dinner like a pauper, in other words: big breakfast, middle-sized lunch, and very light dinner. I take my readings after dinner and in first thing in the morning as per my Doctors instruction. It's still a work in progress and takes up a lot of energy, time, and worry. I've learned that if you can get a health team, I have a GP, Endo, and other Alternative Health Care providers, also that everyone is different and what works for one person may not work for you.  And most importantly, although I listen to my Doctors I now know I have to manage my disease. It's ok to question if things are not working for you. Good Luck and Good Health to us all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
lada Lad

Thank you for the service you provide.  I hope you and yours stay safe in the coming storm!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.