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Bar&In

Lifting Weights

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Bar&In

I always run but haven’t lifted weights in years until recently, here is my dilemma. 

 

Considering bolusing prior to lifting weights and here is why. Any time I lift weights I am usually 80 - 100 prior but post weight lifting session I am 280+ and it’s getting old, counterproductive really. I’m assuming the intensity and strenuous workouts spike my BG but don’t really know what to do at this point. 

 

Cardio I remain level or may drop 15 - 20 points throughout a run so this isn’t included in above, would be suicide to mix insulin and cardio. 

 

Thoughts? 

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macksvicky

Since I'm a type 2 and only use a basil insulin things may be a lot different. I can lift for an hour or two and come out of the gym in the 50's, once I found myself at 42.  I can power walk for the same amount of time and actually gain 20 to 30 points but weight lifting makes me drop like a rock. I do keep 2 or 3 reasonably carbed protein bars in my gym bag and a meter to ward off nasty surprises. I check before lifting and sometimes eat a bar before my workout and don't have any lows. Maybe a bolus would be beneficial for you.

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Bar&In
12 hours ago, macksvicky said:

Since I'm a type 2 and only use a basil insulin things may be a lot different. I can lift for an hour or two and come out of the gym in the 50's, once I found myself at 42.  I can power walk for the same amount of time and actually gain 20 to 30 points but weight lifting makes me drop like a rock. I do keep 2 or 3 reasonably carbed protein bars in my gym bag and a meter to ward off nasty surprises. I check before lifting and sometimes eat a bar before my workout and don't have any lows. Maybe a bolus would be beneficial for you.

 

Thanks for replying! That’s interesting that we have the complete opposite outcomes. 

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DanG

Could your 280 after weight lifting be a function of liver dump to cover low blood sugar?  i.e. perhaps eat carbs prior to workout?  perhaps check blood sugar several times through your workout?

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macksvicky

Checking throughout your workout sounds like a great idea, if you see a sudden drop then a spike that may be your liver being helpful, if you gradually keep climbing then you know eating some carbs and/or a bolus might be a good idea.

 

I hope you get it figured out, lifting doesn't sound like something you want to quit doing.

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Bar&In
18 hours ago, DanG said:

Could your 280 after weight lifting be a function of liver dump to cover low blood sugar?  i.e. perhaps eat carbs prior to workout?  perhaps check blood sugar several times through your workout?

 

No, I lift at night so not a LD/DP. 

 

I may check my BS throughout course of lifts but I do circuit training within timeframes so may be a problem. Another plan may be to bang my cardio out prior so I am relatively low (70 or so) then hit weights hard and hopefully keep it under 140 max.

 

Thanks for suggestions. 

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macksvicky

I lift after work myself, no way I'm getting up at 3:30 to be at the gym when they open at 5 which doesn't leave enough time to do the weights I want, shower and get to the office.

Since we seem to be opposites, cardio prior to weights may solve your problem. Since the weather is warming up, I started doing some power walking again. A couple of miles at lunch and last night was a 4 mile power walk. Pre walk 78, post walk 111, post weights 82. Your cardio should lower you enough that the weights hopefully won't raise you much.

 

I wish you well on the experiment :) 

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Java

i know nothing about insulin but wanted to say good luck figuring out something that works for you, B&I ~ that's amazing that lifting spikes you so bad

 

miss V & i are lifting buddies even though we live so far apart ~ we text each other our workouts and keep each other motivated

 

we LOVE lifting 

 

:rock:

 

 

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bestpenispump

Checking throughout your workout sounds like a great idea, if you see a sudden drop then a spike that may be your liver being helpful, if you gradually keep climbing then you know eating some carbs and/or a bolus might be a good idea.

 

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Type 2 Fighter

That recent published study of intermittent intensity in exercise showed improved insulin sensitivity after 3 months. 

 

I see spikes w weight training but am experimenting for 3 months to see if the overall improvement is the result. 

 

I get a spike w intense lifting (dead lifts, squats) but lowered BG with 30 min of walking. 

 

Everything about resistance training makes sense.  

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Grover Ramsey

I know that my friend goes to the gym and he is okay,) But he doesn't run a lot therefore I think you need to ask in a doctor or a professional trainer who has the same problem,)

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Cajarn

I have never run on my own, but for more than a year now I have been going to the gym and I have no problems.

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