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adiantum

High protein diet > lower risk of Alzheimers

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adiantum

A diet high in protein rich foods such as meat and legumes reduces the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease, new research from Edith Cowan University has found.

Researchers from ECU’s School of Medical and Health Sciences examined the diets of 541 Australians and measured the levels of amyloid beta (Aβ) in their brain, which is a precursor to Alzheimer’s disease.

They found that participants with higher levels of protein in their diet were less likely to have high levels of Aβ in their brain, reducing their risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease.

Brain boost

The participants were divided into three groups based on their protein intake.

They found that those with the highest consumption, around 118g per day, were 12 times less likely to have high levels of Aβ than those in the lowest consumption group, who ate only 54g per day.

Lead researcher Dr Binosha Fernando said this was the first ever study to examine the relationship between protein consumption and Aβ.

“The research clearly demonstrates that the more protein eaten the lower the chances someone has of having a high Aβ burden on the brain, which corresponds to a lower risk of developing Alzheimer’s in the future,” she said.

Looking for a link

Dr Fernando said it was still unknown what was driving the relationship between high protein intake and low Aβ.

“One possibility is that previous studies have shown that a high protein diet is associated with lower blood pressure,” she said.

“High blood pressure is a risk factor for both Alzheimer’s disease and cardiovascular disease. We also know that developing cardiovascular disease increases your risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease.”

Dr Fernando said the next step was to further examine what role gender, genetics, age and metabolic factors play in the relationship between protein consumption and Alzheimer’s disease.

Getting enough protein

Protein is found in animal products like beef, pork, lamb, eggs, fish and poultry, as well as in plant-based foods like legumes, whole grains, nuts and seeds.

Amount of protein in common foods:

Food

Protein per 100g

Chicken

30g

Beef (steak)

26g

Tuna (Bluefin)

30g

Lentils

10g

Pinto beans

20g

Peanuts

26g

Milk

3.4g

Cheese (cheddar)

25g

*Source: US Department of Agriculture

“To get the protective effect that we have demonstrated, you need to be eating about 120g of protein each day, which isn’t too hard” Dr Fernando said.

“For example, if you had a mixed bean and tuna salad for lunch, 100g of chicken and salad for dinner and snacked on a handful of peanuts during the day, you would be getting very close to enough protein to lower your chances of having a high Aβ burden in your brain.”

Lifestyle focus

ECU’s Centre for Excellence for Alzheimer’s disease Research and Care has also recently identified depression and trouble sleeping as potential risk factors for Alzheimer’s disease.

The Centre is also currently investigating if a combination of the spice circimun and fish oil can potentially delay the onset of Alzheimer’s disease.

Dr Fernando worked with Centre Director Professor Ralph Martins on the research.

 

The research was supported by the Australian Imaging, Biomarker & Lifestyle Study of Ageing and the Australian Alzheimer’s Research Foundation.

Associations of Dietary Protein and Fiber Intake with Brain and Blood Amyloid-β’ was recently published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease.

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.ecu.edu.au/news/latest-news/2018/02/lower-alzheimers-risk-one-of-the-pros-of-a-high-protein-diet

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DavidEthridge

A low-fat diet rich in antioxidants such as vitamins E and C throughout life may be a good protection against Alzheimer's and a large range of other diseases.

 

1) Include vegetable oils, nuts, green leafy vegetables, and whole grains in your meal.
 
2) A diet rich in food containing vitamin B is important. Different B vitamins come from different natural sources, such as potatoes, bananas, lentils, liver, turkey, tuna.

 

3) Magnesium is also necessary for brain function. Defatted soy flour, whole grains, wheat bran, and nuts are sources of a large amount of magnesium.
 
4) Green tea consumption on a daily basis can also prevent Alzheimer's.

 

Professionals at Alzheimer's care near Morris County NJ take care of a proper diet plan for their Alzheimer's patient.

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TX_Clint
1 hour ago, DavidEthridge said:

A low-fat diet rich in antioxidants such as vitamins E and C throughout life may be a good protection against Alzheimer's and a large range of other diseases.

 

1) Include vegetable oils, nuts, green leafy vegetables, and whole grains in your meal.
 
2) A diet rich in food containing vitamin B is important. Different B vitamins come from different natural sources, such as potatoes, bananas, lentils, liver, turkey, tuna.

 

3) Magnesium is also necessary for brain function. Defatted soy flour, whole grains, wheat bran, and nuts are sources of a large amount of magnesium.
 
4) Green tea consumption on a daily basis can also prevent Alzheimer's.

 

Professionals at Alzheimer's care near Morris County NJ take care of a proper diet plan for their Alzheimer's patient.

IMHO. Isn't that called the 'Kill a diabetic diet'? Being dead you'll never get Alzheimer's.

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dowling gram

Like many diseases Alzheimer's is a crap shoot. It has many causes and all the ideas about diet are catch as catch can. All forms of dementia are rolled into 1 envelope these days. In my opinion though a good diet may help the best thing to keep dementia at bay is to use your brain. I try to learn something new every day. I do crosswords, word puzzles and jigsaw puzzles every day just to keep my brain active. A friend of my husbands did math puzzles every day and he lived to 96 with his brain working just fine.

 

Now I'm not saying that an active brain is a cure all but it does help even if you do get Alzheimer's.  I read one study where they did an experiment in a nursing home with patients in different stages of dementia. They did mild physical exercise and worked their brains with simple questions that made them think. All patients had mental and physical improvements. It goes to show that if you don't use it you lose it

 

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Kit

Funny enough, the OP, or the article cited, seems to skip some nutrients that are important for brain function.

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2805706/

 

Omega3 fatty acids

 

VitD is fat soluble. Funny enough, I read something last night (forget where) that the two highest sources of dietary VitD are cod liver oil and pork lard.  I question the mention of cereal grains in their list.  They tend to be fortified in VitD and not significant in the grains themselves.

 

Saturated fat - Butter, ghee, suet, lard, coconut oil, cottonseed oil, palm kernel oil, dairy products (cream, cheese), meat

 

In regards to B vitamins, the OP seems to have skipped eggs, which are a good source of a number of B vitamins.

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