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MamaD

Working Fulltime

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MamaD

I work a fulltime job plus mandatory OT. I am a type 1 diabetic and this is my first pregnancy, I had am only 15 weeks and I feel like work just keeps getting harder and harder for me the further along I get. My blood sugars are constantly dropping while at work and I’m swollen and retaining water by the end of my shifts. I’m not sure if being diabetic means I should work less earlier in my pregnancy or am I being a “baby” about everything? 

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JohnSchroeder

If your blood sugar is constantly dropping during your shifts it sounds like you need to lower your basal insulin.

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MamaD
9 hours ago, JohnSchroeder said:

If your blood sugar is constantly dropping during your shifts it sounds like you need to lower your basal insulin.

Thanks for the input but I see a specialist who I talk with twice a week about my insulin doses. The purpose of this post was for other pregnant women who have worked a fulltime job and how it affected there ability to work.

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adiantum

When my feet swell its because ive not been drinking enough water  but I am not pregnant.

I really think you should discuss this with your doctor as your body is telling you that something is wrong.

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dowling gram

Every woman has hormonal changes during pregnancy whether or not the have diabetes and having T1 diabetes complicates things. I think your problem has less to do with working but more to do with being pregnant and having diabetes. I also think you have to consult your medical team about insulin changes because you are pregnant.

 

I copied this from a medical site

 

During pregnancy, the placenta supplies a growing fetus with nutrients and water. The placenta also makes a variety of hormones to maintain the pregnancy. In early pregnancy, hormones can cause increased insulin secretion and decreased glucose produced by the liver, which can lead to hypoglycemia (low blood glucose levels). In later pregnancy, some of these hormones (estrogen, cortisol, and human placental lactogen) can have a blocking effect on insulin, a condition called insulin resistance.

As the placenta grows, more of these hormones are produced, and insulin resistance becomes greater. Normally, the pancreas is able to make additional insulin to overcome insulin resistance, but when the production of insulin is not enough to overcome the effect of the placental hormones, gestational diabetes results or there may be worsening of pregestational diabetes.

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