Jump to content
Diabetes forums
  • Welcome To Diabetes Forums!

    Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today to contribute and support the site.

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Violette865

What does a low C-Peptide test mean?

Recommended Posts

Violette865

Hello--

 

I posted a few weeks ago, because I have been experiencing worsening signs of diabetes (weight loss, kidney problems, thirst, blurry vision, slow healing, infections, etc.) for the past six weeks.  (I'm 49, female, 5'8" and currently 121 lbs.) Some have been been coming on for a couple of years now (showing borderline high glucose levels and low insulin), but really accelerated after I caught the flu 2.5 months ago during a time of major stress.  After that, it's been one cold or kidney infection after another.

 

I had an A1C test in September, and it was normal at 5.0.

 

In the past month, I started testing my blood sugar. It's usually over 100 fasting; can shoot up to 140 after a couple of bites of carbs, and even hit 200 fours hours after eating if I have caffeine.

 

I finally got in to see an endocrinologist who has run a ton of tests. As of today, I am showing the following:

 

--  GAD 65 antibodies NORMAL: 0.00 nmol/L (normal <=0.02 nmol/L)

--  A1C NORMAL: 5.0 (again, normal is anything below 5.7))

--  C-Peptide LOW: 0.7 ng/ml (normal range: 0.8-3.5)

 

In the past few months I've been struggling, I was told that if the A1C was normal, I couldn't have diabetes. Now I'm reading that the C-Peptide might indicate that the damage was already done.

 

What can/should I expect to happen from here?

 

Thanks so much! You guys are awesome.:-)

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
don1942

In simple terms, low c-peptide readings indicate lower than normal natural insulin production

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Fraser

My first question is whether you fasted for 12 hours before the test and are you on a LCHF way of eating.

also was the standard range printed on your test results.  The standard range can vary depending on the type of equipment the lab uses.

 

my non fasting numbers were in the high range (just after breakfast )  when I found our fasting was required I paid to have the test run by another lab.  My numbers were solid mid range.  Of course this is where I saw that the standard ranges can vary.

 

in General a high c peptide readings mean you are over producing insulin (more typical in a poorly controlled T-2) low readings as you know is more typical of t-1.  Now a variation of T-1 is LADA or latent auto immune disease in adults.  Which ususually  progresses very slowly and at first does not always

register on lab work.  Several really non answers sorry. 

 

I would be be interested in hearing how your doctor interpets your results and if they feel that your symptoms might be caused by something else. 

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Violette865

Hello--thanks to don1942 and Fraser.

 

Fraser, in response to your question, I DID fast for 12 hours, and I have indeed been eating LCHF.

 

At the time the c-peptide blood was drawn, my FBG was at an 85, which is lower than usual; it's usually between 100 and 105.

 

I'm just hoping to figure out my problem so I can get it treated, because I can't imagine feeling any worse...but I'm sure some of you out there actually can.

 

Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
don1942

Keep in mind that lower glucose levels will reduce the need to produce insulin which can result in low c-peptide results. On the other hand, higher BGs will induce higher insulin production.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hammer

Violette, if you are getting after meal BG readings at 200, you are diabetic, or at the very least, you have a metabolic problem.  A non-diabetic will never get BG readings that high, and from what I have seen posted here in the forums, a non-diabetic will typically never get a BG reading of over 115, and that's after eating a high carb meal.

 

If your C-Peptide was at 0.7, that is the level that insurance companies determine, is required to get an insulin pump.  My C-Peptide was 2.0 and my insurance company said that was too high, so I wasn't able to get a pump.  At 0.7, you would be eligible for a pump, if you wanted one.  C-Peptides are the byproduct of insulin production.  The more insulin your body produces, the higher your C-Peptide levels will be.  The less insulin your body produces, the lower your C-Peptide levels will be.  At 0.7, your body isn't producing enough insulin for your needs.  I mean, I was eating less than 50 carbs a day when my C-Peptide level was at 2.0, so if you are eating less than 50 carbs a day and your C-Peptide level is at 0.7, your pancreas isn't producing enough insulin.

 

Ask your doctor for an Oral Glucose Tolerant test (OGTT test), as that will tell your doctor what exactly is happening with your glucose levels.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.