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sk8rmama24

Hello everyone.  I am very new here, and not even sure where on the diabetic spectrum I actually fit.  For my entire life, I have always been symptomatic for diabetes and was tested routinely by my physicians since childhood.  I never had a definitive clinical result, borderline at the most but then would normalize.  Didn't seem to have any impact based on my diet and I generally eat healthy despite my outward physical appearance (apparently everyone that is obese eats Ben & Jerry's and Fritos all day).  I eat fresh produce as much as possible, leaner meats, not a lot of sodium because I hate the taste of salt anyway, whole grains, not so much processed foods, moderate dairy, pretty aware of what food intolerance I have (I can't eat avocado anymore sadly, which bites because I love it.  But after eating half of one, I ended up in the ER with severe pain and blood coming from where it shouldn't and couldn't eat without discomfort for about a week after the episode).  Heck, I even make my own pasta sauce and pizza sauce when I make a low-carb pizza with a cauliflower crust.  Had an argument with a new nurse practitioner at my doctor's office about my diet during a follow-up after ER visit, which she dismissed my statements and diagnosed me as obese and wrote me a referral to a dietician and prescribed an anti-hypertensive diuretic because I was obviously lying about what I was eating and didn't know anything about nutritional requirements.  About 10 days later I was back in the ER again with cardiovascular anomalies, which an overnight observation didn't show anything life threatening and I am basically just waiting until my appointment with a cardiologist before my blood pressure and pulse decide to do the rapid cycling trick again.  Looks like her advice to eliminate dairy from my diet and eat more spinach didn't help much.  Filed a complaint with the health-system, it is being handled and I never have to see her again as noted in my medical record.  My primary doctor (of over 10 years) actually seemed appalled when I described to her the encounter with wonder-nurse.

During the early phase of my pregnancy in my late 20s, I possibly experienced hypoglycemic intervals but never self-tested because diabetes wasn't on the radar for me at that time.  My glucose-tolerance test was within limits, no gestational diabetes.  My daughter was born symptomatic of having a diabetic mother; high birth-weight, hypoglycemic, hair on ears, etc.  My levels and A1C were checked by my doctor before I even left the hospital, and again, was within limits.  This has been the story of my life.  My daughter is 11 now, and I am 37 going on 84 based on how I feel and how many times I have been to the ER in the last month.

Anyway, I have been heading into the cycle of higher blood sugar levels and my primary doctor has been ordering labs more often.  I am pretty much butting up against the clinical threshold for finally being diagnosed as Type 2.  But, my body has done another trick, and my blood sugar levels have decreased significantly in the last week.  Decreased to almost hypoglycemic levels clinically, and definitely low for me physically as I am experiencing sweating, shaking, vision changes and such when I reach lower levels.  I've also had an occurrence where my levels on my home monitor were extremely varied in a short span of time.  Well beyond the limits of error for the meter and strips.  I am talking about 205 to 177 to 174 to 157 to 229 to 128 to 142 to 125 to 120 in a time-span of about 20-30 minutes before bedtime and more than 3 hours since having eaten.  I have never hit 200 or higher before, 160-180 max after meals, so I was a bit baffled.  Once I hit 4 consistent readings in a row, which was 125-119, I quit testing (my fingers were pretty sore at this point) and prayed that I would have a stable blood sugar during my sleep at that I would wake up in the morning.  My meter is pretty new, maybe 2 months, never dropped, not exposed to extreme temps, taken care of and so forth.  Also tried different lot of test strips, different fingers, washing hands again, even changed the battery even though it wasn't indicating low power.  I initially didn't have the control solution to check the meter and strips because it is not routinely carried in the store, the manufacturer must be contacted and they send you a free solution after they ask you about meter age, S/N and test strip lot and expiration.  I've even done a ketone urinalysis home test...nothing abnormal at all there.  I am reasonably confident my meter and strips are not malfunctioning and I even called the manufacturer to get a new batch of a control solution to confirm and managed to convince my mom to do one reading today using her meter and comparing it to what my meter read, that it is probably me that is out of whack, but my first question is, can blood sugar levels cycle through extremes in that short of a time period?  If it can cycle that quick, what in the heck would cause that?

But, to make a long introduction longer, that is kinda where I am at now.  My recent trips to the ER have been cardiovascular related because my blood pressure would elevate to points where my nose would bleed or it would drop so low I was near fainting, and my heart would start to race at 150BPM, drop below 60BPM and increase to 120BPM within 10 minutes without an apparent cause, but then I started seeing different levels with my blood sugar so I started keeping closer track in case it is relevant to my cardiovascular anomaly, but I am throwing abnormal symptoms and tests in pretty much all of my body systems now, so I don't know if my thyroid decided to be overactive, if I have pancreatitis or liver failure, if my adrenals have malfunctioned and so forth.  I even developed reddish circles around my eyes, like a raccoon, food passes through me before it has time to digest and I have a toenail that has decided to lift from the nail-bed and jump ship.  No trauma to the toe, no sign of fungus or infection.  Just a separating toenail.  It just is worrisome that my vision has started to flit in and out, and never knowing when my heart rate or blood pressure or blood sugar will change, not really sure I will have enough warning if I hit a point severe enough to faint.  I feel like a ticking time-bomb.  But until these recent abnormal tests my medical history says I am clinically healthy and am just fat and depressed, so I have no actual medical diagnosis for diabetes, or anything life-threatening that would warrant having a medical alert bracelet, so how would I even alert anyone to what may have happened to me medically to cause me to lose consciousness?

Can I cry about this yet?  I am 37 and I have more specialists than friends already, and just adding more to my contacts.  Don't even get me started about possibly needing a total joint replacement for my ankle because I slipped on ice and fell, but I fell in just the right way (plus I happened to be that lucky patient for the hospital that year and got a surgical site infection that spread to the bone and caused osteomyelitis) that the damage was pretty epic that my first surgeon (director of sports medicine, qualifications not really in question with him) won't even operate on it again after the second surgery he performed, and referred me off to the ankle specialist.  At this point, I feel like I should have my own wing at the hospital since I am there all the time.:(

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meyery2k

Welcome sk8r.  There is a lot going on. Perhaps you can insist on an Oral Glucose Tolerance Test.  That would go a long way towards establishing if you have diabetes.  Then it would be important to find out the type as that determines what to do to control it.  Blood sugar constantly changes as the body thinks it needs it.  Stress can elevate glucose as the body goes into "fight or flight" mode and dumps glucose so you have the energy to do that.

 

As much as possible, find out what is going on and try not to worry too much.  If you find you have diabetes, there is so much you can do to keep it under control.  You have come to the right place for good advice. ~ Mike

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JohnSchroeder
16 hours ago, sk8rmama24 said:

I am talking about 205 to 177 to 174 to 157 to 229 to 128 to 142 to 125 to 120 in a time-span of about 20-30 minutes before bedtime

 

My understanding is that meters have an error threshold of +/- 10%, which all but one of those fall into.  And all of those, whether erroring high or low... are all too high.

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Kit

To be totally honest, if you are bleeding from places you shouldn't be bleeding after eating an avocado, there is something going on other than diabetes or in conjunction with diabetes and that's more extreme than any allergic reactions I have heard of before.

 

You mentioned a number of specialists.  Have you been referred to an endocrinologist yet?  If not, I would push to do so.  if so, have any tests been run to check things like autoimmune attacks, thyroid problems, and similar?

 

In regards to vision, high BG levels can cause vision to go wonky as the excess glucose causes the body to gain excess fluid which can play with the shape of the eye.  I would imagine wildly fluctuating blood pressure might also do the same.  If this is the case, things could go back to normal once those issues are addressed.

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sk8rmama24
9 hours ago, JohnSchroeder said:

 

My understanding is that meters have an error threshold of +/- 10%, which all but one of those fall into.  And all of those, whether erroring high or low...

are all too high.

 

 

True, I didn't do that math for those, I am really new to this glucose self-monitoring business.  The reason I re-tested initially was because of the first reading above 200, I never had a reading that high before, and my levels have actually been lower recently, 86-120, for pretty much every other time I tested.  Then when I got the difference between readings of about 30, I wasn't sure if I had a bad strip, or sample, or something funky, because usually I got readings within 10 if I re-tested to verify the result.  It's not like I invested in a high-quality meter or anything.  I got the cheapest one available at Wal-Mart, though I might see if I can get my doctor to finagle writing a prescription for a meter so I can use one of those free-meter programs through the manufacturers.  But not having an applicable diagnosis yet, might run into issues with authorizations for the supplies.

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sk8rmama24
7 hours ago, Kit said:

To be totally honest, if you are bleeding from places you shouldn't be bleeding after eating an avocado, there is something going on other than diabetes or in conjunction with diabetes and that's more extreme than any allergic reactions I have heard of before.

 

You mentioned a number of specialists.  Have you been referred to an endocrinologist yet?  If not, I would push to do so.  if so, have any tests been run to check things like autoimmune attacks, thyroid problems, and similar?

 

In regards to vision, high BG levels can cause vision to go wonky as the excess glucose causes the body to gain excess fluid which can play with the shape of the eye.  I would imagine wildly fluctuating blood pressure might also do the same.  If this is the case, things could go back to normal once those issues are addressed.

The avocado thing threw me for a loop.  It's probably an intolerance that is heading towards being a full-blown allergy related to latex.  I never really thought about it before, I always had guacamole when I ate mexican meals, and I was always gassy and bloated...but who doesn't get gassy after mexican because consumption of beans is practically a given.  Plus I never ate enough guacamole to cause a severe reaction.  I can eat bananas, and mangoes, and pineapple individually, but if I mix them together in a fruit salad or smoothie,  I end up getting that bloated, irritated thing.  I read somewhere a long time ago that those fruits (most of them I think, bananas and mangoes, maybe not pineapple) are in a latex-bearing plant family and people with latex allergies or sensitivities are often allergic or intolerant to these fruits.  But who am I to say really?  I obviously have zero knowledge about nutrition and diet since I am obese and I just need to see a dietician to tell me I need to eat more foods I am probably allergic to.

 

Endocrinologist is on my list for a referral, but my primary wants me to see the cardiologist first before doing the second referral since my initial symptoms were cardiovascular and the referral was already made and scheduled.  I asked about possibly getting some labs drawn to see if it could be endocrine related, but my most severe primary symptoms were cardiovascular, so there was nothing in my medical record to support ordering the labs.  Without medical necessity in my record, insurance won't pay for the labs.  Just another one of those flaming hoops to jump through.  They apparently need a good reason to send you to a specialist who also needs a good reason to actually order the tests.

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Kit

I can understand your frustration.

 

If you are developing, or have developed, reactions to various foods as much as you have, surely your PCP can give a good reason to test you for various allergies?  Honestly a dietitian or nutritionist isn't going to be able to help much if he/she isn't aware of items which are problematic.  not saying they are usually very useful in the realm of diabetes, but that's another subject.  :D

 

Now in most cases I would actually recommend looking into a low carb\moderate protein\high fat diet (lchf).  Basically the body turns basically all carbohydrates (all plant based foods) into glucose so we limit our consumption of those types of foods.  For me its no grains at all, few root vegetables (onions, radishes, some carrot, etc), no sweet fruits with the exception of maybe some berries once in a while.  Avocado, zucchini, yellow squash, and tomato are examples of non sweet fruits.  Meats, dairy, eggs, fish, seafood, and similar have minimal affects.  Nuts and seeds are also on the approved list along with non starchy above ground vegetables which I eat in quantity.  The majority of my calories comes from natural fats like olive oil, avocado oil, butter, lard, tallow, and similar.

 

The benefit many people see, along with their BG numbers significantly dropping, is often a significant loss of weight.

 

However, in your situation, it would be difficult to recommend a specific diet given too many unknowns on your other issues.

 

I will recommend stepping back on the whole wheat, rice, and fruits.  Seriously, they turn straight into sugar and will make dealing with your BG levels more difficult.

 

Oh, and don't fret about the cheap meter.  I use the ReliOn Prime from Walmart myself and am extremely happy with it.

 

Anyway, I wish you luck and I hope things finally progress far enough that you get to see the right specialists who will run the right tests to determine what all is really going on and what all my be symptoms of those issues.

 

Feel free to stick around, ask any questions you might have.  While we might not have a lot of experience with a lot of your issues, there is a lot of first hand every day experience dealing with diabetes and diet here.

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sk8rmama24

I think I was frustrated 20 years ago.  Now I am not sure what I feel.  I used to have an allergist when I was a child-young adult and received immunotherapy for probably 10 years, but it was mostly seasonal and environmental allergens because that was causing chronic eardrum ruptures and nosebleeds.  Food sensitivities really weren't an issue when I was younger, but I had a nutritionist/dietician for awhile because I had high cholesterol sometimes and didn't lose weight really, no matter what I ate.  I don't even remember how my mom found the place and they weren't open long, but it was called The Right Dimensions and it was just a small nutritional and weight management practice run by two women that promoted the diet concept created by Rachael and Richard Heller that was published in 1993.  It is called the Carbohydrate Addicts Diet, and is similar to other low-carb diets like Atkins, but based on an individual self-assessment that relates to a person's ability to handle carbohydrates.  In some ways, it isn't as restrictive as other low-carb diets because fruits and nuts and starches and pizza and candy and such can still be eaten, but it is limited to a single meal and balanced with other food types.  The other meals are more limited to proteins and certain low carb vegetables, and snacks can be added as necessary to prevent weight loss that exceeds 2 pounds weekly.

I had a body composition analysis done and checked in frequently for years, and apparently my bone structure is large and dense, coupled with my muscle mass, organs, tissues and minimal amount of body fat to be healthy, even at my ideal lowest weight, I would still be classified as overweight by the BMI.  I am just a larger person overall, but the Carb Addict method is the only one that ever helped me lose weight or feel like I wasn't hungry constantly.  But that was when I first learned that some foods will cause me to feel hungrier if I eat them and basically block my sensation of feeling full at all, so I always was hungry and never satisfied and the typical nutritional recommendations don't really fit for me, but most dieticians will argue that I am just being uninformed and following fad plans not backed with research, but seriously, the USDA doesn't seem to be able to support diet composition consistently because now we go from a pyramid to a plate and specific quantities to be 'healthy'.  That was before the whole Atkins craze exploded and fad diets were popping up left and right and Weight Watchers was losing popularity.  It's actually easier now to follow the Carb Addict method since so many fad diets have cropped up, but it was really difficult to integrate before 2000 because it was new and relatively unknown.  I've tried tofu, but soy doesn't seem to work well with me.  Cabbage is good if green, but I don't do well with red.  I can tolerate almonds in small quantities and have made my own nut-butters with a mini-processor instead of buying processed pre-prepared versions.  I have an extensive history of trial and error with food, but I am pretty in-tune with my body now, more so than when I was younger.  So I just 'know' when things work or don't, and I modify as needed.  I never really pursued allergy testing for foods because I wasn't sure it would do much except cost money to find out what I shouldn't eat because it would make me sick.  I am just tired of doctors and other healthcare providers because it takes awhile to find ones that actually listen to you and don't mind when you come in to your appointment and tell them you need to be tested for this situation or evaluated for that and how to make it happen.  Most doctors don't like being told how to do their job, but essentially they are just people I 'hire' to help with certain things I can't do or figure out myself, and as paid employees, I am actually the one that should be running the show.  It is my health after all, and I inhabit this body 24/7/365, so I think that makes me a subject matter expert about my health and well-being and how I feel, even if I don't fully understand or know the nitty-gritty details about how every cell in my body works.

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stevenal
Quote

It is called the Carbohydrate Addicts Diet, and is similar to other low-carb diets like Atkins, but based on an individual self-assessment that relates to a person's ability to handle carbohydrates.  In some ways, it isn't as restrictive as other low-carb diets because fruits and nuts and starches and pizza and candy and such can still be eaten, but it is limited to a single meal and balanced with other food types.  The other meals are more limited to proteins and certain low carb vegetables,...

 

Type 2 diabetics by definition are carbohydrate intolerant. What's the point of spiking your blood glucose even once a day? No mention of fat in your description of this diet. It's the one food that has little or no effect on insulin or blood glucose, and should be the nutrient of choice for diabetics.

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sk8rmama24
7 hours ago, stevenal said:

 

Type 2 diabetics by definition are carbohydrate intolerant. What's the point of spiking your blood glucose even once a day? No mention of fat in your description of this diet. It's the one food that has little or no effect on insulin or blood glucose, and should be the nutrient of choice for diabetics.

Well, if I had mentioned every detail about the diet, the post would have been a couple hundred pages long like the book, describing the research, client examples, nutritional requirements and interactions and monitoring the effectiveness of food items consumed in alleviating cravings and weight control issues.  The once a day glucose spike did not seem to be an issue for me during the years I was very regimented about everything I ate following that plan.  I actually didn't feel as good if I didn't have those carb variations at least once a day.  Then I ended up on some medications that are known to increase risk or cause metabolic issues, and was also not as strict in foods I chose as well because I just didn't have the mental drive to devote to adhering to multiple regimented activities continually when other issues cropped up in life.  But even after that slight change in my eating habits, I was fine for years and had good labs.  It's not that I gave up completely and started eating nothing but fast food, processed foods, refined starches and all that stuff that probably isn't healthy, I just wasn't able to maintain the level of commitment needed to follow the plan 100% each day without fail even though I was still choosing foods that are mostly healthy.

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stevenal
On 5/6/2018 at 2:07 PM, sk8rmama24 said:

I am talking about 205 to 177 to 174 to 157 to 229 to 128 to 142 to 125 to 120 in a time-span of about 20-30 minutes before bedtime and more than 3 hours since having eaten.  I have never hit 200 or higher before, 160-180 max after meals, so I was a bit baffled. 

 

If these numbers came about after your self-assessment and while following the diet, I would re-assess. Organ damage begins to happen around 140.

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