Jump to content
Diabetes forums
  • Welcome To Diabetes Forums!

    Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today to contribute and support the site.

Mscott08

Is pre type 1 possible in a 6 year old?

Recommended Posts

Mscott08

Hi everyone, not sure if this is even the right spot to post. I might cross post. I am reaching out for opinion and support. My son is 6 years old and very small for his age. (39 pounds now. Was 42 2 weeks ago and is the average height of a 4 year old.) we have a history of type 1 in our family. (Yes I know it’s not passed down, just heightens the risk ) anyway my son has been showing signs. Small signs. So back in December we had a A1c checked and it was 5.5. We had it check again last week and it’s now 5.8 and he tested positive for 2 or 3 antibodies (I know at least 2 but I think she said 3) but he has resently experience a lot of the symptoms more. Ex. Wetting the bed agian (going pee more often) asking for water all the time, complaining of headaches. And nausea after eating something sweet. Moody and a few other things. I need to say he DOES NOT EAT REGULAR FOOD. He has a strong oral eversion and is picky on what he eats. He drinks a supplement drink. The drink is low carbs and sugar. We live out in the middle of nowhere and the only pediatric endocrinologist is 2 hours away and so booked we can’t get into him till August. We are working on finding another one sooner. We hope to find one today that will see him soon. His doctor diagnosed him with pre type 1 or developing type 1. I was always under the impression you can’t have pre type 1. I just want some opinions and thoughts. Not looking for dx or anything like that. Just looking for experience or someone who knows more about it than I do. Any tips I should know?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kit

I think the Pre prefix should be banned.

 

Pre diabetic is often used in the T2 realm and is used to refer to T2 diabetics in the early stages for totally non medical reasons.  I have never heard the term Pre used for a Type 1 myself, though I am not an expert in the subject.

 

Your son has tested positive for multiple antibodies

Your son has an A1C that is steadily rising.

He is showing signs of very high blood glucose levels (increased thirst and urination to the point that he is wetting himself)

Your son is a T1 diabetic

 

Get yourself to a nearby pharmacy.  Pickup a Blood Glucose meter, strips, lancing device, and lancets.  You do not need a prescription for these items and the pharmacist can be extremely helpful in getting you setup and showing you how to use these items.

If you have a Walmart or CVS pharmacy nearby, they offer meters with rather inexpensive strips.

 

Test you son's BG levels, especially an hour or 2 after meals.

Normal readings will be somewhere between 70 and 120.  For someone young like your son, they will likely be in the lower half of that range.

 

If you see a reading above 200, take him to the emergency room.  You don't have time to do absolutely nothing while waiting for an endo to have room in his schedule.  Your son's life is at risk.

 

T1 diabetes often comes on very swiftly in youth.  You can go from just fine to DKA (diabetic ketoacidosis) in a relatively short amount of time and this is very dangerous.

Edited by Kit

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
meyery2k

When you test your son, make sure his hands are clean and dry.  Food residue can result in false high readings.  I think Kit has offered great advice and this is something you can do to see what is going on versus waiting to see if a situation develops that can be life threatening.

 

If you have questions or need guidance, post it and it will be answered. ~ Mike

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mscott08

Thank y’all! I will go get a  monitor. I was thinking of getting the ketones strip as well just to see. This is for sure going to be a challenge as he has sensory issues and hates blood or finger pokes. I will make him do it regardless if he is upset. Him being upset is not as important as his life. I think I am in shock still though to be honest. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kit

Ketone strips are also a very good idea.  If he's testing positive for ketones, I'd also take him to the ER.  This means his body is starting to breakdown body fat and muscle to try to get energy that it can't from food due to lack of enough insulin.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
meyery2k

For the pokes - I would recommend the One Touch Delica lancer tool and the extra fine 33 gauge lancets.  The tool allows to set how hard the punch is.  The cheap tools are downright painful and make an already unpleasant experience that much worse.  Poke around the sides of the fingers and changing around fingers and hands helps too.  Fingertips and pads are painful test points so try not to poke them.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mscott08

What Is the fasting number suppose to be? Like when he wakes up in the mornings? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
JohnSchroeder

likely below 100.  I have read that small children run higher, but not sure if 6 years old is considered small children anymore.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mscott08

I did get him a meter:-) I have checked him a couple of times. Mostly after about 2 hrs after he eats it’s been between 122-197 I did check before bed last night (about 3 1/2 hrs after he ate) he was 127 . this morning he work up and I checked it to see if it changed and he was 176. I tired to upload his picture but it won’t let me :-(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
JohnSchroeder

Kit was right earlier in that the term 'pre' really isn't used with T1, but there is something called the honeymoon period.  Basically its the time during which your body is still destroying its T-cells.  So his body would still be lowering his blood sugar, but not as well as a healthy individual.  And obviously more so than an established T1.

 

So huge disclaimer.. we're not doctors..but it sounds to me like he is in this honeymoon period where his body is still doing some work.  Sooner or later, he will need to go on insulin.  I can't even guess when that will be.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mscott08

I know y’all are not doctors but y’all have more knowledge than me :-) Thank y’all for everything! I am just glad we caught it early! The pediatrician said there was a study that starting insulin before they are dependent on it can slow down the progression rate. Said I should talk to the endocrinologist about it. Have y’all heard of anything like that actually helping?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
JohnSchroeder

I'm not entirely sure that a half working pancreas is at all preferable or that prolonging that stage with insulin is a good idea.

 

A good metaphor might be that it would be like having two people both trying to steer a car at the same time.  When choosing how much insulin you take, you have to take X units for Y carbs.  So for instance, if I eat 30 carbs, I might take 5-6 units to cover that.  But what if 50% of the time my body is going to compensate for those carbs?  I'd likely have a low blood sugar episode.  And you'd have no idea when the pancreas is going to work, and how well it will work..

 

So your learning curve of figuring out exactly how much insulin to take is going to be thrown off by an unseen driver making changes you can't predict or measure.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.