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buddy7

How plastic is affecting our environment!

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buddy7

For last half century, plastic has become an integral part of our daily life. From furniture to grocery bags, from vehicle parts to toys, plastic is an unavoidable element of our lives in a variety of forms. However, from being regarded as a very vital presence in the contemporary world, plastic has now come to be looked upon as a material of immense potential destruction and harm. As is commonly known, plastic isn’t biodegradable, which accentuates the threat of lingering waste plastic for years and for generations to come. According to estimates, people around the world throw away almost four million tons of trash every day, of which 12.8 percent is plastic, polluting land, air, and water. While plastic thrown into landfills contaminates the soil and groundwater with harmful chemicals and microorganisms, the effects of marine pollution caused by plastic are immeasurable.

 

How are your beaches and cities affected by this plastic contamination? Tell us your general feelings and what can be done in years to come to eradicate this international environmental polluted epidemic to our earth. Where birds, fish, and animals writhe in agony after plastic ingestion and left to die in their habitat, where food no longer exist but plastic does. My body cringes to see this gross man-made inhumanity what’s occurring in our oceans.

Your thoughts pls.

 

http://www.dw.com/en/multinationals-polluting-oceans-with-plastic-in-the-philippines/a-40638102

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JohnSchroeder
2 hours ago, control said:

 

Just recently, I came across this article:  https://www.popsci.com/bacteria-enzyme-plastic-waste

 

I found that interesting.  That's a great step forward.  Doesn't do anything for the plastic in the oceans and waterways, unfortunately.  But still good news.

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meyery2k

Several years ago, our local government banned the thin plastic shopping bags that would be given away at stores.  The outcry in the community was loud as many would reuse the bags as trash liners or to pick up animal waste.  We had to purchase cloth shopping bags.  The argument was that they would become contaminated with stuff over use (they can be laundered).

 

Now that it is a habit, we just do it and try to promote our model to other communities.  There has been a significant reduction in plastic trash found on the roadside and in the ocean.

 

Now styrofoam containers for meals and plastic straws are on the block.  Again, we are complaining, but I think we can see this as the greater good in the long term.

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buddy7

Hi Mike!

And the same over here Mike: “Several years ago, our government banned the thin plastic shopping bags that would be given away by the stores. With an alternative, if you wanted one of these bags for your shopping it would cost you 5 pence, but to all, it was a human outcry, most said no way, was I going to pay 5 pence for a shopping bag. But the ignorance of it was, we hadn’t a clue what these bags and other waste were doing to our oceans, fish, birds and marine animals years down the road.

 

With education and getting people to understand, the true reasons of polluting our earth, the message today is finally getting through. I have no doubt there has been a significant reduction in waste in general. Rather Styrofoam containers will be the answer for the future, it’s left to be seen.

 

Plastic pollution may not even be visible to the naked eye as research is showing that microscopic plastic particles are present in the air at various locations throughout the world and in all major oceans. Plastic is now ubiquitous in our terrestrial, aquatic and airborne environments .....that is. It’s everywhere.

 

The world is, finally, starting to wake up to this enormous problem of world pollution.

When you think of it, plastic manufacture began, dating back to 1284, 

Plastic waste is one of many types of wastes that take too long to decompose. Normally, plastic items can take up to 1000 years to decompose in landfills. But plastic bags we use in our everyday life take 10-1000 years to decompose, while plastic bottles can take up to 450 years to decompose.

How long, is it going to be, before our Scientist comes up with a neutralizing organic material which can act as a biodegradable? Biodegradable is simple, It means an item that can break down into natural materials in the environment without causing harm.

 

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-5829935/A-rare-sea-turtle-starved-death-stomach-clogged-plastic.html

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adiantum

I've always tried  to be environmentally friendly but am ashamed that Ive been using plastic straws without thinking.

Particles from synthetic fabrics in our clothing also becomes a pollutant  after washing when the grey water eventually meets our oceans & rivers.

 

From 1st July  so called single use plastic bags will no longer be provided by the supermarkets.

I dont know how this will work for the home delivery of online shopping.The driver said he will have to put individual items in the crate & individually put them on my kitchen bench. This is going to affect his times but I could  take my own crate to the truck.

 

Plastic picnic ware like plates & cutlery will no longer available, which is great although the paper plates Ive used have a very thin plastic coating.

Our anglers must wear blame for the death of turtles because they allow bait bags to become litter that eventually gets  washed into the waterways.

 

I buy degradable plastic bags for dog waste & the advertising on those bags claim that company also manufacture garbage  & kitchen bags.

So it can be done, or better still bags  created from recycled paper , flax etc 

 

The local TV  has an informative program , perhaps in the beginning it was  just preaching to the converted, but  the awareness is meeting the mainstream.  War on Waste

http://www.abc.net.au/tv/programs/war-on-waste/

 

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buddy7

Hi Lee!

Thanks for your response post and the link to the thread, taken your points on board found them all fascinating and most educational, made so much sense. This topic intrigues me, the intolerance of seeing animals suffering at the hands of us human beings. With no one being held accountable.

 

In one the Daily Mail links, I got so incandescent with rage reading the ill-fated death of this endangered species the green turtle, who lives 80-100 years to an adult age, to have its life ended by this man-made pollution plastic waste. Ocean habitats today are being destroyed by this deadly plastic pollution which ends up in the ocean and multiplies each year with one result the death of many marine life. Albatross and their chicks, seagulls, penguins, seals, and many other birds, all suffer the same fate.

 

I have no doubt plastic, environmentally has become a national disaster, to marine life/mammals, where they are ensnared or entangled, which causes suffocation and death. Let’s be clear about this, our oceans have always had an abundance of food for marine life in their habitat, but what does these animal know, but to see these bit of plastic as food, they’re not apply intelligent like humans, how can they determine what’s bad for them, so they consume the abundance of plastic which been dumped in our oceans, and sadly the marine animals see this as food, it becomes a catastrophe because these bits of plastic will be ingested taken back to their young, regurgitated as food for their young, then picked up from their mother, enter into their young bodies causing starvation and dehydration and then death.

 

Plastic packaging especially the ubiquitous plastic bag is a significant source of landfill waste and is regularly eaten by numerous marine and land animals, to fatal consequences. Synthetic plastic does not biodegrade. It just sits and accumulates in landfills or pollutes the environment. Plastics have become a municipal waste nightmare, prompting governments all over the world to implement new and stiff regulations to avoid this man-made inhumane practice that has become so prevalent wherever country you go today.

 

Plastic pollution may not even be visible to the naked eye as research is showing that microscopic plastic particles are present in the air at various locations throughout the world and in all major oceans. Having said that, what chance the marine animals have. No one had a clue, the manufacture of plastic, years down the road we're going to be a disastrous pollution and how best to get rid of it, and it has now come too passed it’s now destroying our fragile ecosystems. (Earth)

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buddy7


Humans have made enough plastic since the Second World War to coat the Earth entirety in Clingfilm, an international study has revealed. This ability to plaster the planet in plastic is alarming, say scientists for it confirms that human activities are now having a pernicious impact on our world.

 

Research shows, that no part of the planet is free of the scourge of plastic waste. Everywhere is polluted with the remains of water containers, supermarket bags, polystyrene lumps, compact discs, cigarette filter tips, nylons and other plastics. Some are in the form of microscopic grains, not visible to the naked eye, others in lumps. The impact is often highly damaging.

 

Today, I have chosen one of the most versatile marine mammals. The seal. A free-spirited animal who loves to frolic in the waves and call out to its friends dies on a daily basis because of ocean plastics. It is not the seals’ fault because their natural habitats are slowly being overpopulated with plastic. The main problem seals face is the fact that they have nowhere else to turn too, so plastic becomes a natural part of their habitat when this shouldn’t be the case. Seals ingest the plastic, they mistake for their natural diet of fish and soon suffer the same fate as the Albatross chicks.

 

Sir David Attenborough broadcaster and naturalist. A life succession of authored documentaries and presenter. Yes, a big fan. I follow him as an exuberant wildlife fanatic, completely enthralled with his work, today I’ve chosen some extracts from one of his quotes:

We are at a unique stage in our History, never before have we had such awareness of what we’re doing to our planet Earth, and never before had we the power to do something about it. We all can do something about it, we all surely have a responsibility to care for our planet Earth. Surely the future of humanity indeed and all life on earth now depends on us.

 

How one can detach one’s self from such a compulsive subject.

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meyery2k

While this doesn't mitigate the damage that has been done or that being done, I think it is inspiring that we are acknowledging what is going on and trying to correct.  Some of this may have been out of simple ignorance in the past.  As I wrote earlier, I was highly skeptical of the plastic bag legislation but I have seen it working first hand.  There is much less plastic garbage along the roadsides.  Because of this, I am more open to supporting legislation to ban styrofoam food containers and plastic straws.  Sure 1 foam box and straw is a small thing but multiplied by the thousands in which they are given and then sometimes carelessly disposed of all adds up.

 

You summed it up perfectly in your post Buddy.  We are now aware that some of our activities and industries are more harmful than we realized, and the attempt is being made to do something meaningful.

 

I remember when they legislated in the United States to stop selling fuel with lead.  The outcry was great and there was all this uproar about how unleaded fuel was not the way to go.  We did fine and it is now believed that this might have also helped us as a society since we were all being poisoned by lead in the air.  

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Hammer

The problem isn't with the general public, it's with the manufacturers and food suppliers.  Years ago, we never had plastic anything....sodas came in glass bottles, groceries were packed in paper bags, snacks came in cellophane packages or aluminum foil packages, then, everything started coming in plastic containers, and the food stores used to ask you, "Paper or plastic?".  Now they just give you plastic bags.  When a person is done with a plastic container, all he can do is to throw it away.  The same applies to paper or cardboard containers, but paper and cardboard breaks down and doesn't last forever, like plastic does. (remember getting a Big Mac or a Gino Giant in a cardboard container?)

 

If the manufacturers of food products , as well as all products, would stop packaging their products in plastic, we wouldn't have a plastic problem.  And just to mention, there are a number of devices available that will convert plastic back to oil.  One machine I saw was invented by a man who also invented a machine that would convert contaminated water into drinkable water, was small enough to fit in your house, and you just placed any type of plastic in it, and it would convert the plastic back into oil.  Of course, there are huge machines that do this also on a much larger scale, but if a person had one of the smaller machines in their house, they could ask their neighbors for any plastic waste that they had, that way, it would lessen the negative impact the plastic is having on the environment, and would give the machine owner, free oil.

Edited by Hammer

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buddy7

It’s always going to be hard to change the masses of people behavior overnight, or over a short period of time, it just won’t happen. So you become diverse, change the product's materials, or the method of waste ….. Neutralization by biodegradable organically. Some years ago the UK did a survey on who are still flushing plastic cotton buds down the toilet, and strangely enough, 29 out of every 100 were still doing it, you couldn’t possibly stop people flushing plastic cotton-buds down the toilet, so make them more degradable material i.e. paper or pasteboard, and hopefully this will resolve, a negligible proportion of plastic waste. Reference, also to other domestic home devices. I say, let’s focus more on the real problem, where it’s been dumped, that’s the prime evil.

 

Introduce tougher legislation on those companies who are producing plastic products. Or introduce a plastic tax, until such time companies change their manufacturing materials. This can be done, just do not try to convince 7.6 billion, a world population, and I’m being cautious on the rhetoric chosen. Why! Because plastic pollution has now become an international problem. ( It's my belief  legislation works).


Like what has been done to the leaded petroleum to unleaded petroleum, (and that was legislation) to stop us all as a society, poisoning the world slowly, (introduced in the UK 1989). A quote I used from my dear friend Mike’s post.

 

Unleaded petroleum is now seen as the way forward, clean petrol vehicles with the use of a catalytic converter to clean the exhausted emissions.

But have to agree with you Mike, our streets are now cleaner from the ubiquitous plastic bag and a huge consensus has been made of the awareness of plastic pollution in our streets.

 

The UK takes their recycling very serious, it began in 2003 Parliament brought out new legislation on recycling, and each house in the UK was given 3 bins or more according to the size of the house for their daily waste. These bins were colored, blue for all recycling waste, brown- for all kitchen and garden waste, and green- for all non-recycling waste. These bins are monitored on collection day, if you are caught mixing waste in any bin, your garbage is generally left on the day, you’re then reported, a warning letter is sent to you if this is repeated you’re find £500.

 

The world is, finally, starting to wake up to this major problem which is affecting our planet. (Pollution)

Edited by buddy7
Word!

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OneEye

There was a documentary a few years back about the plastic flotilla in the Pacific/Atlantic oceans...the size of Texas. I was surprised to learn that you can turn plastic back into oil. I think, that in the near future, someone is going to see that as a free energy resource, start scooping it up and turning it back into oil.

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Hammer

I have a problem with forcing people to recycle, and fining them if they don't.  In my area, they have plastic bins/tubs that you set out on recycling day, that contain all of your plastic waste, and another bin/tub for your aluminum waste.  Since these are basically tubs, everyone in your neighborhood can see what you've thrown out.  Do you really want your neighbors to see the aluminum bin/tub overflowing with aluminum beer cans?  How about the plastic bin overflowing with empty plastic whiskey bottles?  How about your empty insulin pens?  Your empty plastic pill bottles?  No thanks, I'll keep putting my trash, regardless of what it is, in those heavy duty contractors trash bags.  I have a private contractor that I have to pay to pick up my trash, so let him sort out the plastic waste and aluminum cans from my trash if he wants to.

 

To me, forcing people to recycle like that is an invasion of their privacy.  Why force people to recycle, then fine them if they don't, when all that's needed is to stop packaging things in plastic?  Stop the problem at the source, not at the end user level.  If the consumer doesn't get a product in plastic, they don't have to be concerned about how to dispose of it.  Don't fine the consumer, fine the manufacturer.

 

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Kit

Problems don't really stop happening at the source if consumers are more than eager to keep with the status quo.

 

I don't know why some areas are still so primitive with their recycling and similar containers.  A good windstorm can leave stuff scattered all over the neighborhood.

 

We have 3 cans, all provided by the waste company.  One great big huge gray one is for composting.  Kitchen food waste and yard waste primarily.  Pizza boxes too for some reason.  Second is a great big huge blue one.  That is for recycling.  All recycling, regardless of type.  It all goes into one great big heavy, not easy to blow around, and covered container.

Then there's a teeny tiny little green one for everything else.  Maybe holds a couple kitchen sized garbage bags and that's about it.

 

Now I just wish they would get better with pickup times.  Garbage is once every other week.  So is composting.  They alternate weeks.  Recycle is every week, but didn't used to be.  It was so easy to get confused on which cans you are supposed to put our for that particular week.

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ran23

Our  Garbage/Recycling lost their accounts with China, I have glass bottles and plastic bottles piling up.  Paper products go in the trash.   They still take metal cans and cardboard only.   

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buddy7
16 hours ago, Hammer said:

I have a problem with forcing people to recycle, and fining them if they don't.  In my area, they have plastic bins/tubs that you set out on recycling day, that contain all of your plastic waste, and another bin/tub for your aluminum waste.  Since these are basically tubs, everyone in your neighborhood can see what you've thrown out.  Do you really want your neighbors to see the aluminum bin/tub overflowing with aluminum beer cans?  How about the plastic bin overflowing with empty plastic whiskey bottles?  How about your empty insulin pens?  Your empty plastic pill bottles?  No thanks, I'll keep putting my trash, regardless of what it is, in those heavy duty contractors trash bags.  I have a private contractor that I have to pay to pick up my trash, so let him sort out the plastic waste and aluminum cans from my trash if he wants to.

 

To me, forcing people to recycle like that is an invasion of their privacy.  Why force people to recycle, then fine them if they don't, when all that's needed is to stop packaging things in plastic?  Stop the problem at the source, not at the end user level.  If the consumer doesn't get a product in plastic, they don't have to be concerned about how to dispose of it.  Don't fine the consumer, fine the manufacturer.

 

 

 “Forcing people to recycle, and fining them if they don't”: My dear Hammer I also have a huge problem with that, but I haven’t a problem with what the neighbors see or don’t see. We have a weekly collection, so at no time at all my bins are overflowing i.e. beer cans etc. A pointer: They are quite large bins, and have a secure lid/cover, once, all waste is put in the correct bins, and I see no reason for it getting disturbed. When I put my bins at the kerbside on collection day, it’s completely up to the garbage truck inspector to have a look if he wants to. Which I’ve seen him do occasionally.

 

“A private contractor”: The garbage collection trucks are governed by our local Borough Council, who I pay my annual rates too, which increases each year. My annual rates for this year are £1557 which include household waste and recycling, community services and amenities, includes Police, fire and other services not mentioned.

 

“To me, forcing people to recycle like that is an invasion of their privacy. Why force people to recycle, then fine them if they don't. Stop the problem at the source, not at the end user level”: And you’re quite right. We call that legislation, you have no choice, can assure you hammer what pisses me off, big time is having to pay for something twice, a find of £500 if I accidentally mixed my waste. It’s like the proverbial Motorcar you pay your road Tax and motor insurance, and then someone comes along and says to you, you’re not allowed on the highways. Utter nonsense.

 

It’s going to be a long time coming, before we see a significant reduction in marine and landfill plastic waste pollution sights say, we’re looking at another 7-10 years. If international heed of awareness is implemented.

 

You’re absolutely right, fine the manufactures, introduce legislation, which makes it law, and when a law is passed on something; Meaning if you don’t abide with that law, that’s where penalties set in.

waste.JPG

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buddy7
15 hours ago, Kit said:

Problems don't really stop happening at the source if consumers are more than eager to keep with the status quo.

 

I don't know why some areas are still so primitive with their recycling and similar containers.  A good windstorm can leave stuff scattered all over the neighborhood.

 

We have 3 cans, all provided by the waste company.  One great big huge gray one is for composting.  Kitchen food waste and yard waste primarily.  Pizza boxes too for some reason.  Second is a great big huge blue one.  That is for recycling.  All recycling, regardless of type.  It all goes into one great big heavy, not easy to blow around, and covered container.

Then there's a teeny tiny little green one for everything else.  Maybe holds a couple kitchen sized garbage bags and that's about it.

 

Now I just wish they would get better with pickup times.  Garbage is once every other week.  So is composting.  They alternate weeks.  Recycle is every week, but didn't used to be.  It was so easy to get confused on which cans you are supposed to put our for that particular week.

 

Hi Kit!

As I said before, it’s always going to be hard to change the masses of people behavior overnight, or over a short period of time, it just won’t happen.

 

Primitive areas: It’s my view recycling, has to be the way forward not only for us but the future of our children and grandchildren to come, and the world as a whole. It’s now become an international metaphorical epidemic to see what evolved over the last half-century, an environmental pollution at its greatest proportion, as never seen before by anyone. Landfills and marines plastic pollution have become a catastrophe.

 

Garbage collection looks like you have a similar system to ours. Look, can’t help you with better collection times. Your Mr. Fuzzy will have to help you there. But we have the same problem when the weather gets really bad. I understand it can get a little confusing, to begin with.

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buddy7
15 hours ago, ran23 said:

Our  Garbage/Recycling lost their accounts with China, I have glass bottles and plastic bottles piling up.  Paper products go in the trash.   They still take metal cans and cardboard only.   

 

Hi Ran! Recycling is big business today, looks like your garbage contractors have got a cash flow problem.

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Hammer

Buddy, I searched for a picture of the type of tub/bin that they provide here for recycling, and this is similar to the ones we have here.  Would you want to place a tub like this out by the curb, if it contained personal items that you didn't want your neighbors to see?

 

https://www.indiamart.com/proddetail/rectangular-plastic-tub-4540383512.html

 

 

You do pay a lot for your trash pickup.  Where I live, it costs $62 every three months, and the contractor that picks up the trash, dumps it in his own landfill.

Edited by Hammer

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Hammer
12 hours ago, buddy7 said:

 

“To me, forcing people to recycle like that is an invasion of their privacy. Why force people to recycle, then fine them if they don't. Stop the problem at the source, not at the end user level”: And you’re quite right. We call that legislation, you have no choice, can assure you hammer what pisses me off, big time is having to pay for something twice, a find of £500 if I accidentally mixed my waste. It’s like the proverbial Motorcar you pay your road Tax and motor insurance, and then someone comes along and says to you, you’re not allowed on the highways. Utter nonsense.

 

A neighboring state that I moved out of some 40 years ago, has two ridiculous taxes....the first is called a piggy back tax.  If your taxes exceed a certain amount, then you are taxed again because your taxes exceeded that amount.  The second tax is called a rain tax....a tax that you pay based on how much rain falls on your property.:rolleyes: (see why I moved out of that state?)

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adiantum
On 6/18/2018 at 10:18 AM, ran23 said:

Our  Garbage/Recycling lost their accounts with China, I have glass bottles and plastic bottles piling up.  Paper products go in the trash.   They still take metal cans and cardboard only.   

The same happened here too Ran so our recyclables are building up until another buyer comes along.

 

I'd do anything to save the life of even one animal so reducing plastic & waste is a priority . 

Ive gone back to using glass in the microwave.

Our electricity is from a coal powered manufacture, so I drastically limited my use of electricity &  have saved heaps in doing so.

 

Many years ago a plastic tub like Hammers was provided for papers but it wasnt a success, as the local fishermen were stealing them  as was guys using them to keep their sheds tidy. We now have 3 have bins like Buddy has in England.

 

Ran, your wife shouldve met  a former neighbour of mine.

She mustve drank at  least 3 bottles a day which made her the declared winner of the noisy bin on collection days.

I'd hear the garbos enter the street at 5am & each  bin that was emptied I say " boring". Then when they emptied the drunks bin , I'd yell  out "Winner ".

 

 

 

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Kit
12 hours ago, buddy7 said:

 

Hi Kit!

As I said before, it’s always going to be hard to change the masses of people behavior overnight, or over a short period of time, it just won’t happen.

 

Primitive areas: It’s my view recycling, has to be the way forward not only for us but the future of our children and grandchildren to come, and the world as a whole. It’s now become an international metaphorical epidemic to see what evolved over the last half-century, an environmental pollution at its greatest proportion, as never seen before by anyone. Landfills and marines plastic pollution have become a catastrophe.

 

Garbage collection looks like you have a similar system to ours. Look, can’t help you with better collection times. Your Mr. Fuzzy will have to help you there. But we have the same problem when the weather gets really bad. I understand it can get a little confusing, to begin with.

 

 

Those bins look like ours only in my case either the green one is smaller or the other two are larger.

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adiantum

The local gov here considered having a smaller bin for regular waste  but my concern was that it would cause neighbourly disputes as some would fill others bins.

1 hour ago, Kit said:

 

 

Those bins look like ours only in my case either the green one is smaller or the other two are larger.

 

 

nah.. a bottle a day would become a problem.

27 minutes ago, ran23 said:

It would be too easy to get back into a bottle a night drinking.   over dominoes.   

 

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