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buddy7

How plastic is affecting our environment!

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buddy7

 

It’s always nice to see yet another company among other countless companies and countries have sorted to cut the use of single-use plastic, to help rid the world of one of our greatest destructive metaphorical epidemics, which has reached alarming heights and is increasing rapidly with every passing day. It has become a cause of global concern as it is destroying our beautiful planet Earth and having negative repercussions on all kinds of living beings. Plastic pollution is not a quick fix or a single fix. No one individual can fix the problem of plastic pollution. But working together we can now challenge some of the major problems of polluting our oceans and environment on planet Earth. Do we continue to struggle ineffectively to Recycle Our Way out of this Problem? Or logistically look at the plastic manufactures. Something I’ve been saying for some time.

 

Ice cream maker Ben & Jerry's announced major efforts on Monday to quickly curb its use of single-use plastics. By April of this year, its 600-plus Scoop Shops around the world will only offer wooden spoons, rather than plastic ones. Paper straws will also only be available upon request.

Altogether, the move is expected to prevent 2.5 million plastic straws and 30 million plastic spoons from being handed out each year, Jenna Evans, Ben & Jerry's Global Sustainability Manager said.

"We're not going to recycle our way out of this problem," she said. "We and the rest of the world need to get out of single-use plastic."

 

Evans explained that if all the plastic spoons used by Ben & Jerry's U.S. shops were placed end to end, they'd stretch from Burlington, Vermont to Jacksonville, Florida.

The Vermont-based company, which has a long track record of political and environmental activism, also announced today it will phase out clear plastic cups, plastic-lined cups and plastic lids by the end of 2020.

Although its tubs of ice cream have been made of Forest Stewardship Council Certified paperboard since 2009, they are coated with polyethene to create a moisture barrier, making them difficult to recycle.

Evans said Ben & Jerry's is looking at biodegradable and compostable coating options that "meets our product quality requirements."

 

In response to the initiative, Greenpeace praised the brand for setting clear, short-term targets and for acknowledging that recycling alone is not enough to solve the world's mounting plastic problem.

"Ben & Jerry's and forward-thinking companies around the world are starting to prioritize the reduction of plastics, rather than relying on additional recycling measures that keep the flow of plastics coming," Greenpeace USA Oceans Campaign Director John ……. said in an emailed press release.

 

We've all been taught that recycling is an important environmental responsibility, but of the 6.3 billion metric tons of plastic waste generated since the 1950s, only 9 per cent has been recycled, according to one recent study. What's more, recycling plastics only perpetuates the use of fossil fuel-based 

"In the short term, eliminating plastic straws and spoons is not going to save the world," Evans continued. "But it's a good start toward changing expectations. We're committed to exploring additional options to further reduce the use of disposable items. This transition is the first step for us on a more comprehensive journey to eliminate single-use, petroleum-based plastic in our supply chain, and we look forward to reporting on our progress."

 

London, April 2019 we just can’t wait.

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buddy7

A Grand Plan to Clean the Great Pacific Garbage Patch

 

Recently there has been a lot of talk about the ‘failure’ of the much-publicized The Ocean Clean-up. This article thoughtfully discusses the rollercoaster ride its founder Boyan Slat has found himself on since his conception of Wilson, a 27 thousand kilogram vessel designed to clean up the Pacific Garbage Patch, to Wilson’s recent return to shore after a component significant malfunction.

 

The good news is Slat is not deterred by the recent setback and he seems to be taking the criticism in stride. Though humbled by the tremendous force of the ocean that snapped off an eighteen-meter segment of the boom, Slat has not given up on his mission.

 

We hope that Slat and his dedicated team are successful in their efforts to remove plastic from our oceans. We also hope that each and every one of us realizes that we have the power to prevent more plastic from ending up in the ocean TODAY by focusing on turning off the tap of single-use plastic production.

 

Can a controversial young entrepreneur rid the ocean of plastic? 

Have to say yes, he can; First of all, he’s young time is on his hands, enthusiastic, given the right equipment i.e. tool an above all the resources, when all is said and done, this enormous task, in my opinion, will be successful.

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buddy7

WE MADE PLASTIC. WE DEPEND ON IT. NOW WE’RE DROWNING IN IT.

 

By emphasizing recyclability and recycling over reduction and elimination of plastic waste, major companies are still ducking their responsibility to tackle plastic pollution.

Because plastic wasn’t invented until the late 19th century, and production really only took off around 1950, we have a mere 9.2 billion tons of the stuff to deal with. Of that, more than 6.9 billion tons have become waste. And of that waste, a staggering 6.3 billion tons never made it to a recycling bin a figure that stunned the scientists who crunched the numbers in 2017.

No one knows how much-unrecycled plastic waste ends up in the ocean, Earth’s last sink.

It’s unclear how long it will take for that plastic to completely biodegrade into its constituent molecules. Estimates range from 450 years to never.

 

Meanwhile, ocean plastic is estimated to kill millions of marine animals every year. Nearly 700 species, including endangered ones, are known to have been affected by it. Some are harmed visibly strangled by abandoned fishing nets or discarded six-pack rings. Many more are probably harmed invisibly. Marine species of all sizes, from zooplankton to whales, now eat microplastics, the bits smaller than one-fifth of an inch across. On Hawaii’s Big Island, on a beach that seemingly should have been pristine no paved road leads to it, I walked ankle-deep through microplastics. They crunched like rice Krispies under my feet. After that, I could understand why some people see ocean plastic as a looming catastrophe, worth mentioning in the same breath as climate change. At a global summit in Nairobi last December, the head of the United Nations Environment Programme spoke of an ‘ocean Armageddon’.

 

And yet there’s a key difference: Ocean plastic is not as complicated as climate change. There are no ocean trash deniers, at least so far. To do something about it, we don’t have to remake our planet’s entire energy system.

 

The oceans need to be protected because it is where life began and if not taken care of, life as we know it will end. When dangerous substances go into the ocean, the ocean ecosystems will suffer and become endangered along with the lives of people and of marine life. The Surfrider Foundation recognizes that beaches are unique coastal environments with ecological, recreational and economic value. Who further recognizes that beaches are a public resource and should be held in the public interest? As human activities, coastal development where sea level rises are rapidly on the increase, and the small increase can have devastating effects on coastal habitats. Some of the consequences are, as seawater reaches farther inland, it can cause destructive erosion, flooding, aquifer and agricultural soil contamination, and lost habitat for fish, birds, and plants.

 

The problem with plastic is not new. For decades the plastics and packaging industry has combined with food and beverages companies to frame it as a "litter" problem. Individuals littering are the problem, and it’s the responsibility of individuals to fix it. Public concern is effectively funnelled to "clean-up" events, while industry lobbyists successfully weaken and postpone any policies that effectively would limit the growth of plastic. As a textbook example of how to effectively avoid responsibility for the ever-increasing amounts of single-use plastic, it has been a huge success. But it has been a disaster for the planet, resulting in a plastic pollution crisis.

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FunDad62

Plastic isn't the root cause.  It's sorry a** people that won't dispose of it properly and throw it on the ground or in the water.  But that'll never change.

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buddy7
21 hours ago, FunDad62 said:

Plastic isn't the root cause.  It's sorry a** people that won't dispose of it properly and throw it on the ground or in the water.  But that'll never change.

Not quoting your exact words, in some ways I have to agree with you. Yes, ‘Plastic isn't the root cause. ‘This isn't an imaginary scene, have no doubt about it, today's littering is for real, which of course disgust me, a staggering estimation, for every foot of coastline in the world, there is five shopping bags’ worth of plastic waste. My take on this without pointing the finger, it’s always going to be hard to change the masses of people behaviour attitudes/bad habits, overnight, or over a short period of time. It just won’t happen. Pragmatically, no plastic bag or bottle walks itself from the Supermarket, and dumps it selves in the waterways or the ocean, this blatantly has become the thoughts of humans.

 

But I do think the source of the problem lies with the plastic manufacturers, retailers and food suppliers. I quote from one of my posters. ‘Years ago, we never had plastic anything, all soft drinks came in glass bottles, groceries were packed in paper bags, snacks came in cellophane packages or aluminium foil’, then the plastic manufacturers, retailers and the food suppliers cotton on to plastic. And for some time now, I found myself pessimistically abusing the plastic manufactures, with a problem earmarked by no other but themselves for producing arguably an indispensable product that durability lasts forever. Hence, the mess we’re in now with Plastic pollution.

 

For the last half-century, plastic has become an integral part of our daily life. From furniture to grocery bags, from vehicle parts to toys, plastic is an unavoidable element of our lives in a variety of forms. However, from being regarded as a very vital presence in the contemporary world, plastic has now come to be looked upon as a material of immense potential destruction and harm. As is commonly known, plastic isn’t biodegradable, which accentuates the threat of lingering waste plastic for years and for generations to come. The benefits of plastic are that it’s cheap, strong, light and extraordinarily versatile. So it’s not surprising we’re using mountains of the stuff, so the waste is going to stick around for ages to come.

 

Diverse organizations are working to change the way plastic is viewed and how plastic waste is handle, through strategic planning, communication, consumer awareness campaigns, raising business awareness, documentary films, education, clean-up campaigns, scientific research,  entrepreneurial innovation, legislation and sustainability.

 

So, do our governments stop manufacturing the stuff? Oh no! Think of the economic effect on world trading. So we bury our heads in the sand and pretend there’s no solution to the plastic problem.

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buddy7

Plastics get involved!

Right now an estimated 12.7 million tonnes of plastic – everything from plastic bottles and bags to microbeads end up in our oceans each year. That’s a truckload of rubbish a minute.

Travelling on ocean currents this plastic is now turning up in every corner of our planet from Cornish beaches, to uninhabited Pacific islands. It is even being found trapped in Arctic ice.

Our oceans are slowly turning into a plastic soup and the effects on ocean life are chilling. Big pieces of plastic are choking and entangling turtles and seabirds and tiny pieces are clogging the stomachs of creatures who mistake it for food, from tiny zooplankton to whales. Plastic is now entering every level of the ocean food chain and even ending up in the seafood on our plates.

But it doesn’t have to be this way. Greenpeace is campaigning to end the flow of plastic into our oceans.

 

We are calling on big corporations to act to reduce their plastic footprint – and stop producing excessive plastic packaging that is designed to be used once then thrown away.

We are also calling on governments to act to tackle this problem, by creating closed-loop systems that allow us to recover and reuse materials rather than waste them.

It’s not too late if we act together now we can protect the world’s precious oceans for future generations.

 

Why is plastic problematic?

Plastic as we know it has only really existed for the last 60-70 years, but in that time it has transformed everything from clothing, cooking and catering, to product design, engineering and retailing.

One of the great advantages of many types of plastic is that they're designed to last for a very long time.

That said, on numerous occasions, I found myself ever so often abusing the plastic manufactures, with a problem earmarked by no other but themselves for producing arguably an indispensable product that durability lasts forever. Hence, the mess we’re in now with Plastic pollution.

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buddy7

Back to basics!

Plastic pollution is caused due to the accumulation of waste plastic material in the environment. Plastic is a non-biodegradable substance. It doesn’t get disposed of in the soil or water and its effect is worse when burnt. It is thus a challenge to dispose of. It remains in the environment for hundreds of years and causes air, water and land pollution. It is hazardous for the humans, plants, and several animal species, birds and marine creatures die due to plastic pollution each year.

 

Plastic bags/bottles, plates, spoons, becomes the norm utensils to use with a readily available market. They are economical and easy to use. People prefer using these use-and-throw utensils during family gatherings, parties as it shuns the hassle of clearing and cleaning the utensils later. All they need to do is to gather and throw them away. However, little do they realize that this waste is not disposed of so easily? It continues to remain in the environment and harm us adversely.

Not just plastic utensils and carry bags, furniture and various other things made out of plastic are also used extensively worldwide. It is high time we must realize the harmful effects of plastic pollution and contribute our bit to go plastic free.

 

 It’s always going to be hard to change the masses of people behaviour attitudes/bad habits overnight, or over a short period of time, it just won’t happen. So you become diverse, change the product's materials, or the method of waste ….. Neutralization by biodegradable organically.

Some years ago the UK did a survey on who are still flushing plastic cotton buds down the toilet, and strangely enough, 29 %  were still doing it, you couldn’t possibly stop people flushing plastic cotton-buds down the toilet, so make them more degradable material i.e. paper or pasteboard, and hopefully this will be resolved, a negligible proportion of plastic waste. Reference, also to other domestic home devices without sounding too misogynists, i.e. cotton beauty wipes lurking in the bathroom cupboard. I say, let’s focus more on the real problem, where the plastic waste has been dumped, that’s the prime evil. Introduce tougher legislation on the plastic manufacturers, retailers and the food suppliers.  That said, a plastic tax, (ring a bell) until such time, companies adhere to specific manufacturing regulations. This can be done, just do not try to convince 7.6 billion, a world population, and I’m being cautious on the rhetoric chosen. Why! Because plastic pollution has now become a Global problem. (Believe me legislation works). When you have to pay for something. No one likes it, one bit. Like what has been done to the leaded petroleum to unleaded petroleum, (and that was legislation) to stop us all, as a population, poisoning the world slowly. Unleaded petroleum is now seen as the way forward, clean gas/petrol vehicles with the use of a catalytic converter to clean the exhausted emissions. But have to agree with a colleague of mine, more and more people are now aware of plastic pollution, so our streets are now cleaner from the dreaded single-use ubiquitous plastic bag/bottle.

Finally, the world is talking about plastic pollution, for years, this issue has been under the radar, but now it's the hottest environmental topic out there, which is affecting our planet Earth.

Plastic pollution affects human health. Toxic chemicals leach out of plastic and are found in the blood and tissue of nearly all of us. Exposure to them is linked to cancers, birth defects, impaired immunity, endocrine disruption and other ailments.

We must tackle the root causes of the plastic problem and not allow it to once more become an issue that is out of sight and out of mind simply because we have done our bit by paying yet another unnecessary tax if the need came about. UK government announced that from April 2022 it would introduce a world-leading new tax on the production and import of plastic packaging with less than 30% recycled content. Under new regulations all plastic manufactures will be held responsible for how much plastic they produce, motoring the 6.3 billion metric tons which have become plastic waste in 2018.

 

When you think of it the ‘Homo sapiens’ didn't emerge until about 150,000 to 200,000 years ago. So all in all plastic is relatively in a state of infancy, surely something can be done to eradicate this ongoing human plight before it becomes an epidemic which is corrosively growing by every passing day.

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buddy7

Plastic microparticles found in flesh of fish eaten by humans.

People could be ingesting scores of tiny bits of possibly toxic polymers without realising. Plastic microparticles are getting into the flesh of fish eaten by humans, according to a new study. A team of scientists from Malaysia and France discovered a total of 36 tiny pieces of plastic in the bodies of 120 mackerel, anchovies, mullets and croakers.

 

They warned that as plastic attracts toxins in the environment, these poisons could be released into people’s bodies after they ate the fish. The plastics found included nylon, polystyrene and polyethene. Writing in the journal Scientific Reports, the researchers said: “The widespread distribution of microplastics in aquatic bodies has subsequently contaminated a diverse range of aquatic biota, including those sold for human consumption such as shellfish and mussels.

 

Therefore, seafood products could be a major route of human exposure to microplastics. 

They suggested people eating the fish examined in this study, which is often dried and sold across Malaysia and neighbouring countries, could consume up to 246 pieces of microplastic a year. However, they added: The majority of the tested fish in this study did not contain microplastics. Therefore, it is less likely that an individual would ingest the suggested maximum number of microplastics per annum.

Researchers also said it was unclear whether the particles were actually carrying toxic chemicals so we cannot evaluate the health risks associated with the consumption of dried fish at this moment.

 

They suggested the level of contamination should be monitored.

“The increase in plastics disposal coupled with their continuous fragmentation is expected to increase microplastic concentrations over time. As such, it will become increasingly important to regularly assess microplastic loads in seafood products, including dried fish. 

“Given the fact that dried fish is often consumed as a whole, they may be responsible for the translocation of a significant amount of microplastics into the body of consumers. “Other studies have suggested that shellfish could be an even greater source of microplastic in the human diet. The researchers noted that it had been estimated that “top European shellfish consumers” might consume up to 11,000 microplastic pieces a year.

 

Something I’ve been saying for some time. Fish and shellfish are contaminated with microplastic particles in the English Channel. And they could end up on our dinner plates. Scientists estimate if you’ve eaten six oysters then you have probably eaten around 50 particles of microplastics. And no one knows what impact this could have on human health. As I said before, a measurable hypothesis the ocean fish and shellfish eats the plastic, and we eat the fish and shellfish.

 

 

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buddy7

Who's still smoking?

 

While cities around the world are making strides to combat pollution by banning plastic straws, bottles and bags, environmental and health organizations have been focusing on curbing one of the biggest oceans pollutions? Do you know, 4.5 trillion Cigarette butts the biggest man-made ocean contaminant are littered each year?

Despite efforts to reduce inequalities, there are still groups where smoking rates remain stubbornly high. Smoking among 18 to 24-year-olds has fallen fastest but of particular concern is the 1.4 million 25-34-year-olds who smoke – that's equivalent to one in five.

For the ongoing Cigarette cost, medical information i.e. cancers and education to avoid people smoking, they are some who still find it necessary to smoke. I’d say to all those who still smoke they can choke on their own bad habit! Indirect smoking is also harmful to others and our environment. Don't be fooled. Cigars, vaping, marijuana and tobacco they are all killing our species and planet Earth.

Isn’t it funny how legislation/regulations are still flouted, in so many countries, bars, discos and public places? Where the law is widely ignored as statistics show a decrease from 41% to around 15% overall. I don’t think in my lifetime, I would see a zero tolerance percentage. (It will be nice)

 

Despite the overall substantial decrease in the prevalence of cigarette smoking in the western world in the last 50 years, there remain persistent intergroup disparities in cigarette smoking prevalence and indirect smoke exposure. This article focuses on cigarette smoking as opposed to pipes, cigars, hookah, or other products. This is not to deny the importance of these other types of smoking; rather, we are focusing on tobacco cigarettes both to enhance the consistency of the comparisons that we are making and because of the overwhelming harms that stem from this particular product. Accordingly, the rest of this article will refer to “cigarette smoking” as simply “smoking.” (Methodology discussed) demonstrates the decrease in adult smoking prevalence from 42% in 1965 to 15% in 2015. Despite this progress, the absolute number of smokers has declined more slowly because of overall population growth, and there remain approximately 40 million smokers in the United States. This high absolute number of smokers begs an important question: who is still smoking? Tobacco use and associated disease burden are increasingly concentrated among vulnerable and frequently overlapping populations. When we incorporate disparities around access to care in this already problematic dynamic, the interaction is devastating from the standpoint of both health and equity.

 

That said, people still indulged in this declining habit.

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buddy7

The tragic consequences of plastic pollution!

For some time we knew plastic pollution was indeed a killer, now the evidence is beginning to surface, which saddens me to see this man-made human plight in developing countries is devastatingly causing lives.

 

Do have a look at the link?

 

https://www.standard.co.uk/news/uk/plastic-pollution-kills-one-person-every-30-seconds-in-developing-countries-report-finds-a4142131.html

Edited by buddy7

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