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buddy7

How plastic is affecting our environment!

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buddy7
On 7/12/2019 at 5:09 PM, ran23 said:

I still remember:  The Sun never sets on the British Empire.  

"The Sun never sets on the British Empire".  

My friend, an overused Cliché, it was extreme in and a nauseated manner how the British sat about to invade and conquer those Territories throughout the Globe with some alarming tenacity. At some time the brutality must have been ferociously inhumane, the greatness of the Empire as it were, must have had an enormous impact on human suffering. The vastness of it all in my reading and my opinion can never be repeated or justified in a modern world or society, state, with a colossus of nuclear capability, armoury, we have today. The Empire just won’t happen again. Of its vastness of yesteryear, the ever so strong Empire has now been reduced/diminished to a mere commonwealth of countries/states, by 52 countries, who presides under Her Royal Highness the II. How can today’s history in its Global capacity tolerate such barbaric atrocities?

Wars had never been my definition of inspired greatness.

 

Ok enough said! ……… Back to the main topic.

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buddy7

We organised a conference for 570 people without using plastic. Here’s how it went.

What did we use before single-use plastics became ingrained in our everyday lives? Before the 1980s, plastic bags were a rarity in our supermarkets. In 2019, excessive plastic use feels not just normal, but necessary to sustain our hectic lifestyles. From takeaway containers and supermarket packaging to cheap, low-quality goods, plastic permeates our daily lives.

 

However, with every passing year, the scale tips further against the immediate convenience of single-use plastics, and towards the extreme inconvenience of piles of waste. The true cost to society and the environment of a “disposal economy” is becoming increasingly stark.

 

Read more: Will the discovery of another plastic-trashed island finally spark meaningful change?

 

Finding solutions to eliminate plastic waste in everyday life presents challenges, particularly during large events such as professional conferences. At some time during our careers as academics, scientists, researchers, or industry professionals, we may be part of a conference organising committee. Back in the 1990s, conferences proudly tallied how many coffee cups they used – how times have changed.

PPC

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TX_Clint

I know what most of my family/relatives used. A 5 gallon metal bucket. First we didn't buy anything packaged. The only foods we bought was, flour, sugar, cornmeal, and lard. The first three were in paper or cloth bags and the lard was the source of the metal bucket. All the scraps and leftover food stuffs went into the bucket to feed the hogs. So I guess the solution is to raise hogs. But then we'd have a lot of shoote on our hands.

In reality we need to use reusable and recyclable products.

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buddy7
20 hours ago, TX_Clint said:

I know what most of my family/relatives used. A 5 gallon metal bucket. First we didn't buy anything packaged. The only foods we bought was, flour, sugar, cornmeal, and lard. The first three were in paper or cloth bags and the lard was the source of the metal bucket. All the scraps and leftover food stuffs went into the bucket to feed the hogs. So I guess the solution is to raise hogs. But then we'd have a lot of shoote on our hands.

In reality we need to use reusable and recyclable products.

I know where you’re coming from Clint, without harping-on about the age-thing again 76 puts me in that category, a long time ago when the relative, family and friends visited, my father, head the organizing, for a good shindig, I can relate to the 5-gallon metal bucket. Can also recall 100’s of people turning up, meant, my father, had to slaughter of a cow, sometimes a few pigs or sheep. Most of the food at the time was spit-roasted for the guest, it was either drinking beer directly from the beer kegs, or rum poured from a rum tot, and sometimes from the good old demi-john, and most refreshments were mainly served from the old enamel cups. The point I’m trying to raise, they were no such thing as plastic reusable or single-use plastic utensils, plastic bags were unheard of, when a guest brought their food, as you said “flour, sugar, cornmeal, and lard”, it came wrapped in rough paper or cloth bags. And as you said. “All the scraps and leftover foodstuffs went into the bucket to feed the pigs”.

 

Unfortunately today, we’re trapped in a viral world of plastic, come to think of it, plastic everything. Why? Because, it’s versatile easy to manufacture, cheap and arguable strong, and perceives to the food manufactures as a formable way of presenting foods for retailers. And of course, it has become ubiquitous, which has now become the problem we have today with ‘Plastic Pollution’, which we have no chance in he// of resolving, or how to get rid of the plastic problem.

 

“In reality, we need to use reusable and recyclable products”.

 

Since China stopped importing plastic waste for recycling, countries around the Globe United States, United Kingdom, Germany, France, Mexico, and Italy, they all have a problem with plastic waste building up in these countries. So countries like Malaysia, Indonesia, Thailand, Vietnam, India, South Korea and others according to plastic recycling media sources, exporting nations soon began looking for new countries to absorb the orphaned waste. The fact is, our plastic pollution crisis, is too big for recycling to fix.

 

It’s my opinion we ought to start looking at the root-cause, the plastic manufactures, we obviously are making far too much of the stuff. On hindsight, this is way too late.

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meyery2k

Perhaps the bell can't be unrung but we can modify our behavior to use plastic wisely.  Single use plastic bags from the store to start.  We, and many others, would repurpose them for storage, trash liners, lunch bags, fasteners (yes, like rope), and many other uses.  Of course there were many instances where the bags were merely tossed aside or escaped with the wind and ended up getting into the environment and causing problems for the sea turtles that would ingest them thinking they were jellyfish and birds that would either ingest them or get tangled up in them.

 

Our county banned single use plastic bags a few years ago.  The uproar in the community was tremendous.  What would we do?  What did we do before?  The arguments of paper bags falling apart and being more "wasteful" than plastic came about.  One thing we have now, that we didn't have back in the day, are the reusable shopping bags.  They can be had very cheaply at Target ($.99).  They are strong, durable over the long haul, and for me, have replaced the single use plastic bags.  I am not unique in that regard.  In fact, it is now a "thing" to score unique bags.

 

I was skeptical of the ban like many others but as my habits changed, I found it really wasn't a big deal.

 

This year, the county has expanded the ban to include styrofoam containers.  The take out restaurants were crying foul but they did adopt recyclable materials.  Of course, those cost a little more and the price was passed along to the customers. 

 

Little changes eventually will add up to big ones.  How does one ride a bike 100km?, 1 meter at a time.

 

 

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buddy7

Your comments made so much sense, and have to agree with you, all the way, admittedly I see no let-up on Plastic pollution anytime soon, and we’re at this pernicious crossroad, where, we all must share the responsibility to care for our Planet Earth. No matter how small or insignificant your actions may seem, they matter. It only takes one person to start a movement that could lead to a major environmental breakthrough. That matters to mankind. The fact is, we’re all in this (metaphorical) epidemic together, frustratingly prompt. Plastic pollution and this is not a quick fix or a single fix. No one individual can fix the problem of plastic pollution. It is said the environmental problems in recent years are due to a lifestyle of mass production, mass consumption and mass disposal. Therefore, recycling and reducing household waste is completely different from the days of old, which requires extra time, action, and costs.

 

I have no doubt the message is getting across on awareness, and people are beginning to take heed, but what becomes alarming in developing countries one person dies every 30 seconds due to diseases caused by Plastic pollution. According to the United Nations. Not for one moment must we warped our thoughts, this will not happen in the Western world. Plastic pollution is now one of the greatest public cause of concern in the world.

 

Most countries today seeks to address the ubiquitous plastic problem with its vastness, from Antarctica to Australia. The Great Barrier Reef and its ecosystems are seen as pristine but it is quite heavily damaged today by plastic pollution. Plastic was a visual reminder of how convenient and disposable people’s lifestyles had become, and that the products people are using for just a few moments, were ending up in these pristine environments.

 

Unless you’re HRH Prince of Wales who at some stage predates the plight of Plastic pollution, to a world population. Shouldn’t we have taken heed?

 

A brilliant analogy: Little changes eventually will add up to big ones.  How does one ride a bike 100km? 1 meter at a time.

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