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Larry H.

Any problem with Erythritol odor baking?

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Larry H.

Last night I was going to make some cookies I normally use almond flour and splenda or pyure as a sugar.  Those come out nice and raise to a degree but I had recipes that called for Erythritol so I ordered it on line.  Here is the other issue with what happened.  I had thought I still have some fresh Almond Flour. Turned out I only had a small amount left but remembered that in the freezer I had a bag a friend gave me who didn't like how it baked.  It was the Hodgeson Mill brand.  I also noted it was well past the use by date but I had already mixed the liquid ingredients so I used it including the Erythritol.  As it was baking I noticed the house started to have a very odd and disagreeable odor.  It was dark in my kitchen so it was hard to judge how they were doing and I left them in probably longer than I should have. The end result was that what normally is a somewhat thick dough ended up wider that usual and flatter.  Around the edges its was burnt in places.  (before I go much farther I forgot that the flour I used was a darker color with a lot of specks of hull in it).  When I went to take the off the sheets they were like glued to the baking pans. They were very soft feeling however. When they cooled though they were quite crunchy and didn't taste exactly bad considering how the house was smelling.  Trying to clean the pans though and the spatula I used to remove them I could tell something caused it to be like concrete an had that odor I detected when it was baking and after.  Problem is I don't know for sure where the problem was, the flour or the Erythritol. I can't figure that the flour would cause that gooey sticky situation but then when I read people using the sugar substitute they say it bakes the best of the choices?   Any of this make any sense?  One other thing is I added some ground up walnut pieces to the batter, but I can't can't see that they would cause any of the issues I had. 

 

Larry

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Kit

I've no experience working with Erythritol so I can't comment there.

 

But, the biggest issue with almond flour is the oils in it going rancid.  When this happens, it can smell quite nasty.  My initial guess would be that this was part of your issue.

 

Different sweeteners will also behave differently in baking.  So that might be why they spread a lot more than expected.  Again, a guess on my end.

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Larry H.

I forgot to also say its upset my stomach quite a bit as well so I think like you said that flour being old seems like a culprit but still doesn't seem like it would have caused the gooey mess all over everything, something that has never happened when I  made it before.  It might also be that the way originally the flour was milled might not have absorbed the liquid content as well as it should have.  That could have left the smart balance I used run out where it might not have otherwise?  

The only good side to what I ate this morning bad flour and all is that the number came in at 105 after two hours for the four pancakes, sugar free syrup, blue berries and two sausage links.  That is probably the best morning read so far with food.  I have been getting along to my surprise with a small bowl of steel cut oat meal with some other things, but usually that runs more like the mid 120s or so.  

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Larry H.

More on my Experience with this sugar alternative.     I had made several times a almond flour recipe for chocolate chip cookies.  Once I started using the Erythritol in it they  began to fall completely apart when you tried to remove them from the cookie sheets. And worse they were glued to it like a weld.  I tired again yesterday to be sure and the same thing happened only worse, I had to soak it then attack the left over cookie parts on the sheet.  They broke in lots of little pieces trying it.   I went back today to see if the Splenda which I used to use would solve the problem. And they baked like they should, didn't fall apart  and didn't weld them selves to the sheet. Although I did use parchment this try to be sure.  Before I had always just used the cookie sheet as they have a lot of smart balance in them that made them turn loose easily.   All the reports I see say the Erythritol is the best for baking but while it made wonderful juice on strawberries and peaches which Splenda won't do, the baking end of it was a disaster for me.  

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