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steel

diagnosed recently..and hey i am back!

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steel

hey everyone,

 

i was here back in 2013 after a 'pre'-diabetes diagnosis. got a bunch of encouragement and great advice. i've been away for almost 5 five years, living life and overcoming some personal challenges. thanks to a lot of what i read here, i knew not to take the pre d thing as anything other than a D diagnosis. i think that give me a few years longer before my numbers dipped into the arbitrary territory that marks full blown diabetes. i had been keeping carbs to 70-80 max and then brought that down further in the last couple of months,  before the recent test where my a1cw as 7 and fasting sugar was 8 something. a month before the test i was scheduled to move and i realized today i was eating very poorly for the whole month. results would have been messy regardless, but just something i noticed.

 

even though i took it fairly well initially because i knew in my heart i'd cross the 'pre' line at some point, after a life time of insulin resistance starting in childhood and weight issues caused by the same, i've been feeling really stressed and down on myself. it's not persistent. like sometimes i feel fine like yeah i'll manage this well and at other times i feel deflated, lose hope. today was rough.

 

i hadn't tested BS in a while and had to purchase testing strips and lancets so i can eat to the meter and all that goof stuff. for some reason, that brought on unexpected tears. i just felt like..oh god is this what i'll have to do for the rest of my life? test blood sugar several times a day and what got to  me even more than this was the price of the damned test strips. having diabetes is expensive. i got 100 test strips for 80 dollars canadian. it's just been a rough day. reading dr. bernstein's book gave me some encouragement. chronic illness diagnoses are just tough emotionally and mentally, as you know better than me considering many here have had diabetes for so much longer. i am trying to see both exercise and diet as medicine. i want to do everything possible to live healthy and live long, which most people, especially non diabetics, are convinced we can't do no matter what. it's hard not to internalize this message when newly diagnosed.

 

any words of encouragement, hope, just anything you felt helped you feel better when you were diagnosed..any of it would help.

 

it can be isolating to have this disease.  socially, there's just so much doom and gloom surrounding it, beyond the necessary precautions needed to prevent complications by maintaining good control. like oh you have diabetes..oh my friend's aunt died of it footless and blind at 40 and my neighbour died of a heart attack at 35 etc etc. if you're a fat person, people almost act like you deserve it. it makes it hard not to blame oneself on top of the pain and sadness of a chronic progressive illness diagnosis.

 

thank you for reading these thoughts.

 

Edited by steel

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steel

some info on my diet:

i brought down the carbs to 50, occasionally 55 or 60 about once a week. i am going to get it down to 30, but i want the change to be sustainable so i am not rushing into patterns i can't currently sustain and then get discouraged. so far, for breakfast i have a zero carb protein shake. lunch is a measured half a cup of lentils (about 20 grams of carbs) and one small wholewheat roti (about 15 grams of carbs) and half a cup of full fat yogurt (3 grams of carbs? unless i am mistaken). i sometimes replace the lentils with paneer which is very low carb so brings the carb count down. i am trying to come up with  more low carb replacements for the lentils, so i don't get sick of eating paneer.  at night, it's meat and no starch veggies, like broccoli, edamame, green pepper, cauliflower etc. i still crave a bit of potato sometimes, so i use half a medium potato and bake it. i add a lot of sour cream and butter and have that with my meat once a week or less often. 

 

for snacks, i eat ham and cheese roll ups and almonds roasted at home in olive oil. i also like walnuts so i have those sometimes. post workout, i have half a small apple (10 grams of carbs, slathered in low carb peanut butter).  when i know i'll be eating potato at night, i don't eat the apple. i am fortunate not to have much of a sweet tooth.  i also drink chocolate almond milk at night,  which is basically just almond milk, stevia and unsweetened cocoa powder. i'll reduce that apple intake to a few times a week and then stop altogether if my BS dictates.

 

i'll be checking BS this week to see how i am doing. my goal is to bring A1C down to 5.7 or lower and FBS down to 120 or lower. that's my goal for my 3 month tests. i am working out 5 x a week, 3 days of hiit cardio and 2 days of weight training.

 

 

any comments, suggestions on diet and exercise are also very very welcome.

 

thank you

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Kit

Hi Steel, welcome back to the group.  I didn't come here until March of 2014, so I must have just missed you.

 

I have found that primarily this is a mental game, getting used to what a new normal meal looks like without starches and sugars.

 

A few examples of things I tend to eat.

 

Stopped for dinner on the way home from work.  Had a big salad with greens, green peppers, tomato, grilled onions, and a little cheese with some sliced grilled steak.  I am stuffed and I know from experience, works well for me.

 

I like to buy bags of riced cauliflower from the produce department.  My favorite is called cauliflower hash.  Its cauliflower, broccoli, a little carrot, and a little green onion.  Sometimes for work lunches I will nuke it in a bowl with some fresh spinach, butter, and some sliced kielbasa or leftover meat I brought in with me.  I find it quite filling and less than 10g total carbs.

 

Pesto Zoodles

In a skillet, saute zucchini noodles in some olive oil until it starts to soften (couple minutes most).  Add in a spoonful or two of pesto.  Add a little more olive oil depending on pesto consistency (some can be really thick) and cook for a minute or two more until pesto is hot and zoodles are to your liking.  Serve with shrimp in garlic butter, salmon with lemon butter cream sauce, or similar.

 

Over the weekend I made a big pot of my favorite Sausage and Pepper soup.  Very warm and filling.

 

Breakfasts I might do an egg scramble of some kind.  Or a couple eggs cooked in creamed spinach and mushrooms.

 

Or my favorite zucchini fritters!  Can use them as an english muffin in eggs benedict.  Or use them as a side for just about any meal.

 

With a little thought, there are a large number of possibilities.  Hope this helps with some ideas.

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meyery2k

steel - Welcome!  I was depressed when I was first diagnosed.  I remember wondering what I would eat and how I could possibly enjoy life.  Diabetes was a wake up call that I could live a better life.  I took the diet to heart and I have felt better at nearly 52 than I was at 40.  I love the food.  

 

Tonight is a Chinese Roast Pork, cauliflower with some mayo and chili sauce, and a salad with blue cheese dressing.

 

Stick around and you will find all kinds of encouragement.

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samuraiguy

Keeping your A1C under 6 makes you statistically the same as a non-diabetic for all forms of mortality so realize when you see stories about this bad thing, or that horrible disease affects diabetics more, it is referring 90% of the time to those with A1C's regularly over 7 (CDC, NIH).

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steel

thank you all for the great advice and suggestions.

 

i've been testing blood sugars, though i hate having to jab my fingers multiple times a day. at first, i had a hard time getting the blood to flow. now i shake my arms vigorously and rub my hands together. getting them warm makes it easier to get enough blood for the test. i think it'll get easier.

 

blood sugar at the two hour mark after a breakfast of a slice of wholewheat bread (which isn't my usual but i wanted to test the impact) an egg and 0 carb protein shake..was 6.7.

 

another test today was chinese take out (i know..it was awful) i asked for half the amount of rice in that box thing with 3 compartments. they always add rice to the biggest one. i had 4 teaspoons of that, didn't touch the rest. there was a grilled fish, two small pieces. there was a beef stir fry with green peppers and onions (it was a tad sweet which i didn't expect it'd be) and curried chicken which was mostly potatoes (which i didn't touch) and i think the thickening agent for that sauce must have been corn starch or something. i did have some of that. at the one hour mark, the spike was 9.9 which horrified me. i am not touching a grain of rice after this, and the take out experiment ended badly. at the two hour mark, it was 9 which is also awful but i expected it.

 

in the evening i had a few spoonfuls of sugar free jello and drank a glass of plain unsweetened almond milk. i like the taste. didn't check  blood sugar after this though.

 

for dinner, i had some leftover kheema style beef curry made in a coconut milk base. no tomatoes, no added carbs except from one chopped yellow onion. i also had half a roti with it. it's 7ish grams of carbs. so i had to head out and missed the one hour reading but the two hour reading was 8.4, which is again high. i've started low carbing diligently post diagnosis, so i am also wondering if these numbers will get better in a few weeks as i gain more insulin sensitivity? is that part of how this works?

 

and i don't know if it's any sign of progress, but i'd love to know if it's somewhat positive that my postprandrial reading is lower than the fasting at which i was diagnosed. could just be wishful thinking on my end hehe but i couldn't help but wonder for a bit.

 

anyway, i don't know how to cut out that half of a roti out altogether, but i am looking for low carb substitutes.

 

fasting this morning was 6.7, not good but an improvement from the 8 something on d-day lol.

 

 

any comments/suggestions etc. are as always welcome. thank you all so much.

 

p.s. for the past couple of years, i had very light barely there periods. within a little over a week since diligently lowering carbs, my period came back ..and with a vengeance. some heavy bleeding and cramping ..things that hadn't happened in years. i am also noticing the dark patches in the inner thigh and under arm area are lightening up.

 

p.p.s. i've been feeling really fatigued and tired though and more thirsty which is odd as i almost never felt thirsty and drank very little water.  this past week i've been drinking 2 litres/day. so i thought maybe my BS was too high. the numbers haven't gone above 8.4, minus the take out bit. this leads me to think it's more related to my period and other hormonal changes, with my body adjusting to eating less carbs.

 

 

Edited by steel

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adiantum

Drinking water will be good for you & possibly caused by the BG still as your still seeing 8's & 9's .

Hey, your doing well in testing & learning.

The dark patches are acanthosis  nigricans & they do fade away. That used to be mentioned here many times but not so much lately.

 

Keep up the good work steel.

 

~Lee

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meyery2k

steel - You are seeing first hand what carbs do to us.  It took me some time but once I adopted the lifestyle of eating to maintain my sugar, my diabetes became quickly well controlled.  I was prescribed Metformin when first diagnosed which is the standard with Type 2 in the United States.  I no longer need to take it.  The doctor has pronounced me as being in remission because my fasting readings and A1c test consistently at the same reading as someone without diabetes.

 

Some other benefits from getting a handle on this...

 

I lost a lot of weight and have kept it off.  My weight is stable within a 5 pound range.

I became fit.  I perform activities at 52 that I couldn't do when I was 40.

My elimination is more consistent and regular.  

My, shall we say, intimate functions are much stronger mentally and physically than they have been in years.

I had the beginning stages of the black patches.  Those are long gone.  I also had numerous skin tags, many of which are now gone.

I am mentally sharper than I have been in years.

My eyesight and hearing improved somewhat.

Many other subtle differences

 

I am glad to see you are back and hope you will stay.  I would encourage you to share your morning fasting readings in a subject just for that.  I admit that I thought that was the weirdest thing when I first saw it but came to realize that it help us see that we can do it.

https://www.diabetesforums.com/forums/topic/80426-2018-morning-fbg-tests/?page=128&tab=comments#comment-1019423

 

 

 

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Kit

The finger jabs do get easier.  I make sure to rotate thought different spots on my fingers.  That way I'm a lot less likely to over use any one spot and less likely to get really sore.  I also try to make sure I'm at the shallowest setting possible to get blood.

 

How to drop that roti.  This is where I said it was a mental game.  Unless you are trying to make a sandwich, french toast, or similar, bread really really isn't a requirement.  We're just so used to it that its hard for us to imagine a meal without.

 

You can make your own with low carb ingredients.  Here are a few examples.

https://headbangerskitchen.com/recipe/keto-naan-low-carb-tortillas/

https://headbangerskitchen.com/recipe/keto-dosa/

https://www.ketoconnect.net/low-carb-naan/

 

Oh chinese food.  I adore chinese food . . . and thai, vietnamese, korean, japanese, etc.  One benefit (and downside) of living in the Seattle area is that we have a huge variety of options if you know where to look.  Want Pho or teriyaki?  Walk a mile in any direction and you'll pass 5 different places to get some.  Pho Than Brothers also comes with a fresh made that day scream puff!  The downside?  Its likely not all of them, but many, if not most, marinate their meat in a mixture of soy sauce, corn starch, and sugar.  Almost all (if not all) of their sauces contain corn starch and sugar, even the ones which are not obviously sweet.

 

I have taken to making my own when I get the desire.  It really is kind of easy and gives you better control over what goes in to the dishes.  A few suggestions I have found which really helped me.

 

If you haven't already, learn more about the actual real flavors that go into the dishes.  Most people just go to the store and buy a bottle of thick, and most likely sweet, slop to douse their food in.  When you make things from scratch you have control over what does and does not go into things.  Sugar and corn starch are not necessary so don't put them in.  Want a little sweetness in the dish?  Add something like a drop or two of stevia.  So, stock the spice cabinet well and don't be afraid to play around and learn.

 

My favorite easy week night stir fry is usually a mixture of stuff like cabbage or bok choy, broccolini (prefer it over broccoli), mushrooms, onions, peppers, and zoodles.  Cooked with soy sauce, garlic, ginger, hot chilis or chili oil, sesame oil, fish sauce, and maybe a spoonful of red curry paste.  I usually cook it in lard or avocado oil.  Doesn't always look very pretty, but it tastes good.  :) 

 

Cauliflower rice is a very popular replacement for regular rice.  I am personally very happy to have no rice at all, and I still love cauliflower rice.  Does it taste exactly like rice?  No.  But its still good in its own right.  I often preferred rice noodles over rice itself and the zoodles work perfectly for me here.  You can also look at shirataki noodles.  I personally prefer zoodles, but those are also a good option.

 

One thing to keep in mind when making your own.  You do not need a lot of sauce.  You do not have a ton of rice to moisten and flavor.  Zoodles, cauliflower, and similar don't soak up moisture like rice does.

 

 

In regards to numbers,  for what felt like the longest time I would wake up at least 20 points higher in the morning than I would go to bed with.  That drove me crazy.  Its called dawn phenomena.  Our livers store glucose to be released into our bodies as a source of energy even when its been a while since we've eaten.  In the early morning hours our livers release that glucose as a source of energy for us to wake up, get moving, and find some food.  Its only modern man who has had the option of stumbling into the kitchen and stuffing their face with breakfast cereal, or some other prepared easy food.  Anyway, a non diabetic handles this well.  Glucose is released, insulin is release, glucose goes into the cells to become energy, and all is well.  For a T2 diabetic, glucose is released, insulin is released and BG is still high.  I did some over night testing and found that for me it hits somewhere around 2-3am.

 

As far as I have found, this eventually calmed down for me.  I still get hit periodically, but its more like a couple times a month instead or every single morning.  A small snack at bed time.  Something with few carbs but some protein and fat helped more than anything else.  So I would have some nuts or a thing of string cheese.  That would usually help minimize the rise.

 

When our BG levels are out of whack, other hormone levels can be as well.  Getting those back on track will affect your other hormone levels.  It works the other way as well.  A year or two after I was diagnosed, I started perimenopause.  All of a sudden my oh so carefully controlled numbers went to heck and nothing I did seemed to make any difference.  I eventually started treating the symptoms (hot flashes for me) with over the counter supplements with things like black cohosh, soy, and similar in them.  They got rid of the hot flashes and, surprise, my BG numbers went back down.

 

You are making progress.  Don't forget that.  It takes a little time, even if you are doing everything perfectly on your end.  This is where looking at long term trends can be helpful.  I would do things like graph my morning readings for a few months or similar.  While there were up and down jags, it really helped me see that I was making downward progress over time.

 

The fatigue is likely part of low carb flu.  Its pretty normal to get and eventually goes away.  Things that can help.  Drink plenty of fluids.  Make sure you are getting enough salt and other electrolytes.  When you stop or really minimize processed foods, dietary salt consumption plummets.  While this is often a good thing, sometimes it can be a little too low.  So make sure to salt your food.  Or do things like drink a cup of broth in the afternoon, or similar.

 

Anyway, it sounds like you're doing great.  Just keep it up.  :)

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Hammer

Steel, are you taking any diabetes medications?  One thing to keep in mind if you are taking oral diabetes meds....if you eat something that has a lot of carbs in it and your BG levels go up a lot, it typically takes a few days of eating low carb to get your BG levels back down again.  This is one of the reasons that it's not a good idea to eat a lot of carbs as a treat from time to time.  In my case as a type 2, I use insulin to control both my fasting BG levels, as well as my after meal spikes.  Because I use both types of insulin, if I eat something with a lot of carbs, I can just take more insulin to get my BG levels back down in a matter of hours.

 

When you eat low carb for several days, what are your usual fasting BG levels?  If you eat, say 70 carbs for a week, are your BG levels close to the normal range, or are they still too high?  I'm asking because, if you eat low carb and your BG levels are still too high, then you need to start taking meds to get those  BG levels down.  Also, do you exercise?  Exercise will also help lower your BG levels.  You don't need to run a marathon, just go for a 30 minute walk every day.  Just doing that will help lower your BG levels. (I have a stationary exercise bike that I pedal every day for 60 minutes while I watch a TV show that I recorded from the night before.)

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steel
3 hours ago, Hammer said:
Quote

 

Steel, are you taking any diabetes medications?  One thing to keep in mind if you are taking oral diabetes meds....if you eat something that has a lot of carbs in it and your BG levels go up a lot, it typically takes a few days of eating low carb to get your BG levels back down again.  This is one of the reasons that it's not a good idea to eat a lot of carbs as a treat from time to time.  In my case as a type 2, I use insulin to control both my fasting BG levels, as well as my after meal spikes.  Because I use both types of insulin, if I eat something with a lot of carbs, I can just take more insulin to get my BG levels back down in a matter of hours.

 

When you eat low carb for several days, what are your usual fasting BG levels?  If you eat, say 70 carbs for a week, are your BG levels close to the normal range, or are they still too high?  I'm asking because, if you eat low carb and your BG levels are still too high, then you need to start taking meds to get those  BG levels down.  Also, do you exercise?  Exercise will also help lower your BG levels.  You don't need to run a marathon, just go for a 30 minute walk every day.  Just doing that will help lower your BG levels. (I have a stationary exercise bike that I pedal every day for 60 minutes while I watch a TV show that I recorded from the night before.)

 

hi Hammer,

 

I was put on 250 grams of metformin twice a day. i haven't started it yet. i was hoping to see if diet and exercise changes help. i have been keeping under 50 grams of carbs for about 10 days, minus the take out excursion yesterday which had me spiking at 9.9. i am realizing more and more not only are carbs not worth the harm to our bodies it really isn't worth the stress and anxiety of seeing such high numbers and then worrying about when they'd come down.

 

I am getting worried that my fasting numbers haven't gotten below 6.7 despite lowering my carbs to 50ish, often less than 55. i tried to cheer myself up a bit that it was an improvement from my 8.7 diagnosis fasting sugar. now i just don't know if the slow decline in numbers in my case is normal or if it means something negative.   

 

@Kit thank you so much for the kind words and terrific advice on eating out and cooking..i am a foodie and saved it all for future use! <3 i think i am experiencing dawn phenomenon.

this morning at 6: 30 am my FBS was 7.5, by about 11 am it was down to 7. nowhere near even the "prediabetic"number iirc, let alone normal numbers.

 

I had a lunch of my minced meat curry (less than half a cup) i described in a previous post with 1/4th a cup of lentils, much of it was ghee though like i gathered up all the ghee and hogged it for myself, so it was mostly that with maybe about a tablespoon max of the lentils. i am again testing to see how it impacts my blood sugar. i was glad to see a 6.7 at at the one hour mark thinking by the two hour mark it should get lower, but weirdly at the two hour reading it was 7.4? still not sure how that happened.

 

if i cut out the small bit of lentils i had, my carb count will get very low. i didn't have any other carbs today and at night i plan on eating two chicken drum sticks wrapped in bacon and then baked, with a side of steamed broccoli.

 

i am getting discouraged by the numbers i am seeing. not discouraged in the way of giving up but worrying why i am not seeing the return to  notably lower let alone near normal levels even by counting the carbs this carefully.   and yes i do workout 4-5 days a week. i am doing the liift4 videos by beachbody.

 

@meyery2k

 

thank you so much for your uplifting words. i am overweight by about 90 pounds, so i have a lot of weight to lose.  i like your idea of posting on the FBS thread. i just feel embarrassed about my number being so high even after lowering carbs.  it's just hard not to worry seeing my numbers.

 

@adiantum thanks :) it was encouraging to see the dark patches get lighter.

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meyery2k

@steel - Just keep in mind this is a marathon and not a sprint.  It will take some time to get those numbers down.

 

If I may counsel - I would try the Metformin.  It really helped me to get my glucose under control.  It can also act as a mild appetite suppressant according to my doctor which helped me lose weight.  Eventually I found I didn't need the Metformin anymore and the doctor agreed.

 

Post those numbers with pride!  You pointed out you are much better off than you started.  We would love to see those numbers come down even more with you! ~ Mike

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steel

@meyery2k

 

Thank you once again. I can't tell you guys how much it means to hear encouraging words. It also helps to know it will take some time to get numbers down.

I've also been thinking of starting the metformin. I'll get it on Monday. I want to use everything at my disposal to help my body. And metformin, from all I have read, is a very safe medicine.  Could I ask what your initial dose of metformin was?

 

One more question, I had a dinner of two chicken drumsticks wrapped in bacon. My 1 hour blood sugar was 5.7 and at 2 hours it was 6.5. Is this odd? I thought the number goes down at the two hour reading. I was also thinking a zero carb meal should have been closer to the 5.5 level, going by the normal blood sugar number for non diabetics (something we are trying to achieve) according to Blood sugar 101.  I was glad to see the 5.7 and was like uh oh @ 6.5. I'd love to know if this is okay or not? Thank you so much.  I was wondering if my body was reacting abnormally even to a zero carb meal.  For the second time, I noticed a higher reading 2 hours after a meal.

 

Edited by steel

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Kit

There is nothing wrong with starting on medication.  It does not mean you have to be on it forever.

I started on 500mg met once a day, moving to twice a day within a month (time for me to adjust to it).

I was twice a day for years.  This summer I'm back down to once and, if I can keep my numbers on good range like this, I may be trying to go off it completely next summer.

 

However, there is nothing wrong with staying on the medication if it is necessary.  We do what needs to be done in order to control our BG levels.  If that also means medication, then so be it.

 

Yes, even if you are doing everything perfectly, it takes time for those numbers to drop down.  Our bodies resist the change, even if its a change for the better.

 

As for your meal and results, there are a few possibilities on what was going on.

 

1)  Your body is struggling to keep status quo.  Basically you had a liver dump.  In this situation, I found it helped me to make sure I eat some (not many) carbs every meal.  Some meals, like breakfast, I'll have 5g or less.  Just a little to try to convince the liver that it doesn't need to release glucose.

 

2)  Protein can have an affect on our numbers.  The body can convert protein into glucose via a process called gluconeogenesis.  Your meal seems small enough to me that I suspect this was not a major factor for you.

 

3)  A combination of factors.  Fat and protein can actually slow down the digestion process and that heavily influences how swiftly our BG levels can go up and down.  You may have had a liver dump and then the fat and protein in your meal slowed how swiftly it fell down again.

You'll often see similar with pizza.  Tests at one and 2 hours look great, but the fat and protein just slowed down how fast we digest all of those carbs in the crust, and you'll almost always see spikes at 3 or 4 hours after eating.

 

Now one thing I really want to mention about the numbers you reported.

 

5.7 (103) is just barely out of the under 100 (5.6) range desired for before meals and fasting.

 

6.5 (117) is within the goal of under 120 at 2 hours.

 

Its also under a 1 point(20point) rise in BG levels at two hours.  That is also a personal goal of mine.

 

You are doing well and I suspect it won't be too long before you are right where you want and need to be.  :)

 

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steel

Hi @Kit

 

Thank you for the detailed response and explanation.  It makes a lot of sense.

I've been away for a few days, trying to manage anxiety and focusing on some life stuff.

 

I am noticing my lunch numbers don't go below 7.1 at the two  hour mark. I usually have a small amount of cauli rice with paneer and a bowl of full fat yogurt. I realized the wheat roti was giving me really horrible spikes, went even over the 10 I got from chinese take out. I cut that out immediately. The 1/4th cup of lentils didn't spike me, but I only eat it with cauli rice and yogurt. Another thing I tried was making a soya flour roti, which has me at about 7.5 (sometimes lower but never under 7) at the two hour mark. I'd be fine with taking it out too, but I am not sure why even something like paneer which is ver low carb and cauli rice (no more than half a cup) still has me in the low to mid 7s.  It's stressing me out a bit (sorry..I am trying not to get stressed over everything but I was hoping to meet the 120 target at two hours and never get below 130-135. Not sure how harmful that is and if it's something I can be okay with for that one meal a day.

 

My post dinner numbers are consistently below 7, closer to the 120 target at 2 hours. Fasting is still running between 6 and 7, unfortunately. I've noticed it's closer to 6 when I sleep well. My first week of lowering carbs I didn't have a meter, so I was still messing up. After I got the meter, I've gotten a much better idea of what to eat and what not to go near.  It's been almost two weeks of altered eating, with one full week of proper keto. I am not seeing the quick drops into normal ranges that people report.  That has me a tad worried. But I am really trying to see it, as you guys said, as a marathon not a sprint.

 

Any further input is most welcome and will be received with gratitude as always.

 

Thank you all for reading.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by steel

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Type 2 Fighter

Tim Noakes called this a “disease of humiliation.”

 

im not surprised by your tears. 

 

It’s hit me hard s few times, too

 

 

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Kit

First, don't stress over being stressed.  Silly statement isn't it?  In all honesty, stress happens.  And yes, when you are working hard to try to get your numbers in control and things aren't working out, you're going to stress.  We have hopes and fears regarding those numbers.  Not stressing is next to impossible to do when things don't behave as they should.  I was an emotional wreck about the first 3 months after I was diagnosed.

 

So I'm not going to tell you not to stress.  However, I am going to say I can completely relate and you have my sympathy and compassion.  I certainly don't want to go back to that situation again.  :)

 

As frustrating as things might be, you will not get down to where you want to be quickly.  As I mentioned before, our bodies resist the change, we get liver dumps and similar no matter how good we are and do all the right things.  The best things I ever did was to graph my BG numbers over the course of a month or two.  So I graphed all my morning readings, or all my after lunch readings, etc.  This allows you to get a better overall feel of how you are doing.  Its easier to see that while you may not be exactly where you want to be, you are moving towards that goal.  There may be ups and downs, but there are more downs than ups, that kind of thing.  You've only been at this for a few weeks and some of it was blind (no meter), so you are doing good for such a short period of time.

 

As I was working my way down I developed the 1(20) pt rule.  My goal was to make sure I was within that point range between pre and post readings of any meal,  Our base line (that pre reading) is going to affect your post number.  So if I start at 7.5, its not surprising that my post would be 7.7.  Both are higher than what I want, but it was only a 0.2(3.6) point rise.  That's well within meter variance and I would consider good for the circumstances.

 

Morning fasting readings

I'm not going to say this isn't as important.  However, it is the single hardest number to get into line.  I don't have my data here, but it took me around 3 months before I got my first morning reading under 5.6 (100).  And you know what?  It didn't stay there.  It took closer to a year before I was able to go for an entire month with that morning reading under 5.6 (100).  And you know what?  It didn't stay there.  I still get morning readings here and there above that goal.  But I'm now under it most of the time.

 

I say this for comparison.  While I struggles so hard to get my morning readings down, the rest of my numbers fell into line in less time.

 

So I guess I should have a point to these ramblings.  Look at things as a series of mini goals.  I celebrated my first moring reading under 11.1 (200).  I celebrated my first time under 10(180).  Under 8.3 (150) and similar.  As you can see, I had a ways to go to get to my ultimate goals.  And somehow it seems easier the further from the goal you get and harder the closer you get.

 

And

You are not going to see everything just snap into place quickly, at least not without the right kind of meds (insulin or insulin stimulating and similar).  I can't remember anyone here saying they went keto and BOOM everything went perfect.  What's important, you are making progress towards your goals.  This is all about slow and steady.  It might frustrate us, but in the end things will happen.

 

Just keep at it, keep going.  It will happen.  You have the tools you need in order to make that happen.  It just takes time and perseverance.

 

 

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meyery2k

@steel - Graphing the numbers will likely be a big help.  It seemed like it was such slow progress to get my numbers down but, after 6 months, I graphed the decline and it was actually a pretty steep slope.  My weight was even more dramatic and that was a tough haul for sure!

 

You ARE going in the right direction.  Your body has become used to being hyperglycemic and it will do anything to maintain what it thinks is the new normal.  In time, your body will adjust to the lower numbers.  Many people report feeling hypoglycemic at times when they are now near being hypo.  Their body thinks it is hypo even though it isn't and responds as such.  Crazy, but true...

 

Remember to exercise.  Just simply walking is fine.  Anything to get moving around.  Working muscles burn up glucose AND exercise markedly reduces insulin resistance for hours afterwards.

 

I realize, I did not answer your question about Metformin for which I apologize.  I was taking 1 dose of 500mg in the morning and 1 in the evening.  Eventually I cut that back to morning only, and now I no longer take it.

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steel

@Kit

 

Thank you once again for your compassionate and informative reply. It really helps to hear that I am not alone in being stressed, in worrying and struggling. It really helped to hear from you and @meyery2k that it takes time for blood sugar to go down and that graphing can help us visualize our progress better. i am continuing to work out but have also added leisurely walks, more so i can spend time in nature, which helps us feel better emotionally too. i want to develop a love for walking, as it seems to be a great and often underestimated form of exercise.

 

Kit, I think I definitely misread/misinterpreted posts and thought improvements were seen within a few days. your post put my mind to ease and was a relief to read. i am also learning to celebrate (without carby food hehe) small victories, because this really is something one has to manage forever.  we need a lot of persistence and emotional grounding. this stuff is difficult and really tests the will and our self compassion. not to wax overly poetic but it does seem like diabetes teaches us so much about ourselves and carries so many life lessons. one thing i am learning is to be gentle with myself, to have blood sugar goals but to not beat myself up over every reading that isn't what i'd hoped, as the body is still adjusting.

 

now for something that has me troubled..I got a call from my doctor saying there were white spots on my brain mri. the assumption was they were from high cholesterol (mine is barely borderline) and diabetes (which I haven't had for very long). i am told they didn't look like multiple sclerosis, but they'll be investigating it further. i just feel demoralized that i am possibly already being damaged neurologically from diabetes? that makes me worry for my future, like there's a lot of life ahead of me. a part of me also wonders if they're assuming it's blood sugar and cholesterol because of my weight. i'd think it'd take a while before such damage would be caused. fwiw, i don't have hypertension as it seems to be a big factor too.  i am hoping these spots are more from migraines that i had for nearly a decade starting in my late teens.

i am already starting to see that doctors like blaming everything on diabetes just like they do with weight.

 

 

 

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meyery2k

@steel - Yes going to the doctor and getting news like that can be stressful.  We would all tell you not to stress and we all know we would be if we were in your shoes.

 

Not being able to give better advice, however, I would counsel to try and not worry too much.  There is a possibility the test was misread or some other factor resulting in a false reading.

 

If, however, this does turn out to be something then the hope would be that it is minor and/or it has been caught early so the outcome is a good one.  As you pointed out very well in your post, diabetes teaches us things.  Mainly that we can live with things we think are simply not possible.

 

Keep doing what you are doing, it is the right direction.  I believe you will find that you will be amazed at how much you can do when things get under control.  I went from a state where I would be out of breath walking up 3 flights of stairs and my heart beating at over 120 just sitting in the doctor's office to someone that can ride a bike over 100 miles in a day with a heart rate in the 40's when at rest.  The old me would have scoffed if the new me came back in time and said, this is you now.

 

While I try to keep my posts upbeat, the truth is that it was a lot of hard work, pain, blood, sweat, and tears.  You know this too.  We BOTH know we can persevere.  Our mind can see us through this to a better spot in life.

 

Keep in touch and let us know how you are doing! ~ Mike

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Kit

@steel  I am an obsessive about walking.  Yes, its good exercise, but as with you, its also mentally relaxing.  I go out in the evenings after dinner and walk all by myself.  I don't have to worry about interacting with others or dealing with others.  There's a lonely stretch of road near where I live that is my favorite location.  I can destress, enjoy the time alone.  Sometimes I listen to music.  Sometimes I listen to audio books.  Sometimes I just walk in silence.

 

In regards to the MRI.  I have a story for you.

 

So, end of January 2014 the entire left side of my face and parts of my scalp went numb.  Including my entire mouth.  You don't realize how much flavor water has until you can't taste it anymore.  I was at work and was getting more and more worried.  I ended up leaving early, driving 20+ miles to my local hospital where, when I told them my symptoms, stuck me in a wheel chair and took me straight to a private room.  Do not pass Go type of thing.  A middle aged woman saying she's lost the feeling on the left side of her face set off all sorts of alarm bells.

 

I had just about every test they could do on me.  One of them was an MRI to rule out a stroke.  As I was sitting there waiting for test results, the doctor and a nurse came in.  As she started to take my blood pressure the doctor says "No stroke, no heart attack.  However you have two lesions on your brain and it looks like you have MS.  We're going to refer you to a neurologist."

 

At this point the nurse starts pumping up the cuff for my blood pressure.

 

The doctor goes on.  "Oh, btw, you're diabetic.  Here's a prescription for Metformin.  Get that filled before you leave and follow up with your GP."

 

At this point the nurse gasps and says "wow that's high!"  I swear I think they timed it to get an idea of what extreme stress can do you someone's blood pressure.  They'd already taken it like a dozen times that evening and it had all been normal so they had comparison.  :) 

 

I went through a few neurologists (they kept leaving the practice), a number of MRIs, two spinal taps, and more blood drawn than I have in my body.  I learned some interesting things.

 

There is no test or series of test that can say "You have MS".  Instead they have to basically fail to prove the symptoms are coming from something else.  If you are interested in learning more on the subject, look up information on the McDonald criteria in diagnosing MS.  There are a few paths you can go down to get a diagnosis, but a lot of it boils down to separation in time and space.  This means they have to see lesions in different parts of the brain.  With that time separation, they need to see that these appeared at different times and didn't happen from the same time or event.

 

I have three lesions in different areas of my brain.  However, I don't fall under the time part of the criteria.  The ER wasn't looking for lesions, they were looking for signs of a stroke, so the detail wasn't as high.  The ER didn't catch the 3rd because it was significantly smaller.  They also did not do an MRI both with and without contrast.  When you are going through an active MS event, the lesions related to that event, kind of glow and really stand out.  It was a number of months before I actually had my 3rd MRI that looked at that area again (second was neck) in detail both with and without contrast.  By that time my symptoms had gone and nothing stood out in the MRI.  If the ER had done both with and without contrast, they might have seen at least one of those standing out while others didn't.  That would have given me the diagnosis if it were the case.

 

I also learned that a lot of things can actually cause similar spots to show up on an MRI.  One of them is just getting older.  My first neurologist told me that.  They're not lesions, but they can appear similar on an MRI.

 

My current neurologist says I would be referred to as having Clinically Isolated Syndrome.  I had one apparently documented MS event.  I have a 60% chance of having another one.  She also said that the other 40% never have another.

 

As for treatment, there are a few MS drugs.  They all have side effects which make me cringe.  However, one of my neurologists brought up that there was research showing a keto diet could be helpful.  I did some poking around.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4709725/

 

Over 4 years now and no new events and no new lesions.  Can I say for sure that a keto diet has helped in regards to MS?  No, I can't because I can't say for sure I have it and I can't say if I would have had another if I hadn't started a keto diet.

 

As for diabetes being the cause, I would be surprised.  The first neurological affects usually happen in the extremities (feet, hands, etc) and not the brain.  That's where the nerve damage actually happens.

 

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steel

oo i gotta share my first ever 6.0 after lunch blood sugar!!!! (2 hours pp) *happy dance* i am having a small soya flour roti with paneer or a small amount of lentils loaded with butter and some full fat yogurt. that's become a safe meal for me.  thank you guys for the info, encouragement and understanding.

 

@Kit you are not going to believe the similarities in our experiences with this white spot thing and ...i went to the hospital with the same symptoms you described! i didn't know i had diabetes at the time, but i found out soon after.  i'll PM you soon to share my experience.

 

i also agree that, from all i understand, diabetes related neurological damage happens at the extremities first and would take a long time to hit the brain. i went to the family doc and the locum *insisted* diabetics have these spots. i said i'd expect diabetes related damage to not take place so soon and in younger populations with t2d, which tends to start later so they haven't had it for decades yet. i am 30.

he was like well most diabetics your age aren't getting MRIs. he repeated diabetics have these spots. they are so convinced it's diabetes. and i know better than to just go along with that assumption. then i brought up i had migraines for 10 years (at least), and he was like migraines don't cause these.  i was like they do and are well known for causing these type of changes. and he read the report again which said they were non specific (like the spots) and may be migraine related.  then he said well it could be from that. either way i am trying not to worry to much. he did say they were not dangerous, so that was good to know.

 

 

 

Edited by steel

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Kit

Argh, I go to post and the forum just will not let me do it.  Click Submit, it puts me back at the top of the page and everything I typed in is gone.  Going to try this broken up into parts.

 

Congrats on the 6.0!  See, your hard work is paying off.  :)

 

Doctors can be really frustrating.  I often feel like they like to allow patients to keep their head in the sand until things start to fall apart.  For example, telling someone they are pre diabetic and then telling them to not test themselves and giving them dietary advice like cut out sugar and make sure you eat lots of whole grains and fruit.  Or I've seen some here who weren't informed of a problem until they had already gone far enough to be considered full T2 diabetic.

 

What most people hear.  Don't smoke.  Don't drink much.  Eat lots of whole grains and fruit, avoid fat.  Keep your BMI within the range specified.  If you have high blood pressure, avoid salt.  Exercise.

 

Seriously, look up just about any disease or condition, and you will find that list on ways to treat, improve, recommend diets, etc.  I mean I agree for general health that not smoking, drinking in moderation, eating whole real foods, being active and similar are all good things.  I agree totally.  But having it slammed at us every single time, you stop taking it seriously.  Its like someone saying bless you when you sneeze.  No one really believes you're going to catch the plague or your soul is going to fly out of your nose.  Its a garbage phrase.  Polite, but garbage.

 

I happen to be one of those people who prefers to know the facts.  That's why I pour over my lab results.  I don't trust my doctors to tell me everything.  Or the last one I saw who seemed affronted by my good control.  She kept telling me over and over that there was no reason to have an A1C of under 7.0.  *grumble*

 

Actually its funny.  The doctors who seemed pleased with my control, my diet, and my new life style?  My eye doctor and my neurologist.    Sadly neither can treat me for diabetes.

 

Edit - Apparently the forum does not like me posting a link to the study or quoting the study in regards to diabetes and brain lesions.  Breaking it up into parts didn't help.

 

To condense this all I'm going to just quote a tiny part.

 

"After adjustment for possible confounders, diabetes was associated with cortical brain atrophy but not with focal brain lesions or subcortical atrophy"

 

The atrophy seemed to be directly related to those who also had high blood pressure and was not present in those with normal blood pressure.

 

 

Edited by Kit

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