Jump to content
Diabetes forums
  • Welcome To Diabetes Forums!

    Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today to contribute and support the site.

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

adiantum

Armistice Day

Recommended Posts

adiantum

This book would make an interesting read..'Jean Berthe — The Quiet Frenchman"

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-11-11/fragments-from-france-wartime-orphan-found-by-australian-troops/10478466

 

 

Fragments from France: The wartime orphan smuggled into Victoria by Australian troops

By Tim Lee

Posted about 2 hours ago

A young boy stands dressed in Australian military uniform.

 

 

"In March 1918 on a French battlefield somewhere east of Amiens, Australian troops encountered a young French boy kneeling over a family member killed by shellfire.

Heavy shelling from the retreating German artillery had laid waste to the nearby village and pulverised the landscape, and the boy had shrapnel wounds to his legs.

He gave his name as Jean Berthe and said he was an orphan.

The Australians gave him medical attention and when the Third Australian Pioneer battalion moved on, he went with them.

And so began a remarkable and enduring wartime mystery.

Initially, the boy was a camp follower running errands in exchange for food, but the troops soon became fond of him and made him an unofficial mascot.

They even had an Australian uniform tailored to suit his small frame.

With the Armistice on November 11, 1918, troops relished the prospect of returning to Australia.

One of them, a fisherman from Paynesville in eastern Victoria named Private Bob Simpson, also longed for home, but he couldn't countenance the thought of abandoning the orphaned boy to the chaos and further deprivation of war-torn France.

Author Sandra Hargreaves has spent the past few years piecing together Berthe's fragmented life.

"I think [Simpson] was the one who instigated smuggling him back to Australia," she said.

It is possible that he was also smuggled aboard departing troopships from France to England and then on to Australia in a large blanket roll.

Another account mentions he was hidden from authorities behind a wall of soldiers' kit bags.

Berthe later stated that, dressed in his khaki uniform and presumably blending in with the disembarking troops, he simply marched down the gangplank unnoticed at Port Melbourne in June 1919.

Orphaned boy kept a town secret

Ms Hargreaves learnt of Berthe's story while researching the lives of local men who enlisted from the Paynesville area.

The story of the smuggled French orphan boy was familiar to older locals, but it was virtually unknown beyond the town.

For most of its history Paynesville was a quiet coastal fishing village, and Simpson and Berthe had good reason to keep their story under the radar of officialdom..................................."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
adiantum
We lost over 100,000 Australians in that war that should have ended all wars
 
100 years later , we still shed a tear for them.
 
 
Lest We Forget

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
dowling gram

24 million soldiers of every nationality died in WW2 and my uncle was among them. He was buried in Holland. Canada keeps a book in our Federal Parliament building with all the names of the soldiers that died. Every day a new page is turned. I visited that room once and learned my uncle's page was displayed on Nov. 11th. They will print the page if you want it. I had it printed and gave it to Gram. She was pleased that Canada remembered her first born son.

 

I wonder if the world learned anything from all that death and destruction. To tell the truth I don't think one thing was learned because we continue on the same path

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
don1942

For the past four Veterans Days, our community has launched a fund failing campaign to finance the cost of a service dog through K9s for Warriors for a veteran suffering with PTSD. The training of the dog and the vet costs $15,000. Approximately 20 American Vietnam vets commit suacide daily. At today’s annual  Veterans Day celebration, we announced that we had collect over $20,000 for our fifth dog.

 

However, before the luncheon concluded, we had a surprise visit from Jeff Noris, a local radio personality and comedian who had sponsored a similar fund raising show the previous night and had raised an additional $8,000 which he donated to our campaign, bringing our total to over $28,000. We are well on our way to funding our Sixth dog.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
adiantum

don, thanks to your generosity and for making us aware of such a group, I am now able to make small donations to the Young Diggers Dog Squad.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
TX_Clint

Thanks for your community service it’s really needed and appreciated. However you need to work on those stats. I don’t think 20 Vietnam veterans commit suicide daily. There just aren’t enough of us still around anymore. Change that to all veterans including those still active military and I could maybe believe it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.