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cindylporter2011@gmail.com

New diabetic type 2

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cindylporter2011@gmail.com

Hi everyone, was diagnosed yesterday when my A1C came back at 12.2. Started on glyburide 2.5 mg daily. I have been eating.low carb (Atkins) for several days. Any advise would be appreciated.

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meyery2k

Welcome!  You will find good support and advice here.  For many of us, diet and exercise play profound roles in managing diabetes.  To start, this is a marathon and not a sprint.  It will likely take a month or so before you see improvement in your fasting readings.  If you have any questions, ask them. ~ Mike

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Kit

Welcome Cindy, welcome to the group.

 

Like @meyery2k said above, patience is key.  Our bodies can fight the changes we make, wanting to keep the status quo as norm.  But it sounds like you're on the right track.  Just keep moving forward.  Make sure to test yourself before and a couple of hours after your meals.  Its a great indicator of how your medications, meal choices, and activities are affecting your numbers and will let you fine tune things as you go.

 

If you haven't already, take a look at the recipe section on our forums.  There are a lot of great ideas, links to other sites, and similar.

 

Hope to see you around some more.  :)

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Fraser

Welcome Cindy 

just a note.  Being diagnosed with an 12.2 is not necessarily an indication of your diabetes future.

10 years ago i was diagnosed at 12.0 (big surprise). Now it is always 6.0 or less without medication.

i do Low carb and as much exercise as i can handle, minimal weight loss as not needed. I eat to my meter.

Not always an achievable goal. But there are many tools available to help you control your diabetes.

 

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adiantum

Welcome Cindy, I'm glad you found this forum, it was the best find for me almost 11 years ago when  I was diagnosed with an A1c 11.

I'm still med free but taking meds is an excellent & necessary option when needed.

Dont feel deprived  with the food choices as we can live very well & become creative.

 

You will soon feel great & enjoy a new lease on life.

 

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samuraiguy

Welcome to the forums. I know it can be overwhelming to get an initial diagnosis, but being a goal oriented guy I found it helpful to set some weight loss (if needed) and blood glucose goals (A1C, Fasting, 1 and 2 hours after a meal) and then set up a game plan to achieve them. I also found it helpful to break the goals down to smaller ones to achieve every three months when they usually do another A1C to check your progress, i.e. in the first three months cut carbs down, next three exercise more, next three get weight down 10 pounds, etc... I can tell you from experience that making little changes in your diet and exercise routine can lower your A1C in a relatively short time.

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steel

Welcome to DF! I was Pre-D for a couple of years and crossed the arbitrary threshold into full T2D last month. It was quite disheartening at first, even though the Pre-D should've blunted the blow. I am thankful for all the excellent advice I got here. The first several weeks are the hardest IMO. Some tips from my experience and lessons learnt here:

 

1) BG takes a long time to get into the full blown type 2 diagnosis, for most people. So it's vital we understand it will take time to come down too. This is still the hardest for me, because as everyone said, the body holds on to status quo. It's best to expect small changes, a few points down in fasting numbers which are the hardest to reduce, a few points down in pp numbers, all of these small improvements add up over time and make a big difference in our control and overall health.

 

2) Goal setting, as mentioned above, is very important and requires flexibility also as Diabetes can be quite the emotional roller coaster as we adjust to it. It helps to expect that there will be times when unexpectedly and inexplicably you may miss the mark on your fasting or pp goals, as so many variables affect blood glucose some of which are not within our control. To learn what numbers to aim for, which medicines are safe, which diet has the best results with BG control and so many other questions you may have, check out Blood Sugar 101 by Jenny Ruhl. It's a life saver and such an indispensable guide on Diabetes management.

 

At first, my goal was to reduce my post meal numbers to 140 and below two hours after eating. As I continued to eat low carb, I was able to reduce my post meal numbers to 120-125 and below 2 hours after meals. All of this has been possible because I ate to my meter, which is to say regularly tested my blood sugar 1 and 2 hours after meals to see which foods spiked me, then I reduced the quantity or eliminated them altogether [substituted them with tasty alternatives] as dictated by the meter. It's overwhelming at first, but my meter has become one of my best friends in Diabetes management :).

 

My longer term goal is to get as close to 100 and below (like non diabetics) post meals and slowly lower fasting to 100 (I am still working on this and will be working on it for a long time), then 90s and 80s, basically to get numbers as close as we can to non diabetics. If we get our AICs in the 5% range, we reduce our risk of complications almost to non Diabetic levels though aiming for even better A1Cs is great. :)  You're already on Atkins, which is awesome!   Slow sustainable changes that are doable make the biggest difference.

 

Fixing sleep schedule, if needed, also helps as does adding moderate physical activity. All of this adds up to vastly improved control. A1C is an average, so it doesn't tell the full picture in that if you are having post meal spikes above 140, that's the point at which BG causes damage. So it's important to control those 1 and 2 hour most meal spikes even when A1Cs are getting in range.

 

3) Look around and read more on LCHF diets. This forum is a veritable goldmine of info, recipes, support and encouragement.

 

4) IMO we are fortunate to be diagnosed at a time where online communities such as this one exist. We have so much more access to resources, support, information..you name it. Studies done on Diabetic complications tended to study Diabetics that didn't have a fraction of the resources we do, who stuck to the awful fruits, whole grains, low fat recommendations made by the ADA and only saw worsening BG control and ended up with higher complication rates and worse outcomes.  As I have learnt here from the advice and wisdom of members, if we take care of ourselves, eat a reduced carb diet as dictated by our meter (some can eat higher carbs than others), try to get in some moderate physical activity most days of the week, we can be as healthy as anyone else and more. A lot of non Diabetics are not as proactive as Diabetes requires us to be, which I think helps us overall.

 

I am 30, so I was worried my life was over and horrible complications were inevitable. I know better now..it's not easy but it's one chronic illness where our choices and actions will largely dictate health outcomes. We are fortunate to have a fair bit of control over this and the know-how needed to maintain it. It's difficult but doable. It tests my patience, self compassion and equanimity often since I am still adjusting, but I am already feeling a lot better than I did right after diagnosis :).

 

Wishing you all the best. Stick around! This is such a great community.

 

 

Edited by steel

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steel

oh also check out Dr.  Bernstein's Diabetes Solution. Most chapters are generously provided for free on his website. It's chock full of info on everything from diet, to how to manage diabetes when ill (great advice on handling dehydrating illnesses like diarrhea, which can be dangerous for diabetics), to detailed info on how to prevent and reverse complications. Dr. Bernstein is in his 80s and has had T1D since childhood. Many people find success by following his recommendations. I really like his list of foods we can eat. When he wrote it, almond and coconut flours were probably not widely used so he recommends soy flour. I personally don't spike from it, so I can eat soy flour tortillas/rotis in moderation, like a small one once a day. I think he recommends eating 24 grams of carbs total per day, broken into three meals. I eat between 20 and 30 grams total carbs (not net) a day. Anyway, I just wanted to mention Dr. Bernstein as he's a great resource besides being a very inspirational figure. 

Edited by steel

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dowling gram

Welcome to the forum

 

I was diagnosed with an A1C of 12. I had seen the results of uncontrolled diabetes so I was determined that my relatives fate would not be mine.  With a LCHF diet and my medication I was able to lower that 12 to in the 5's in a few months and it has remained there for 5+ years and I've had no diabetes complications.

 

I say all this to show you that while you'll always be diabetic it is possible to control it. It sounds like you are on the right track. You might also check out the keto diet. It might offer options that Atkins doesn't. Both are low carb diets. After you learn more you may make your own diet.

 

Here we say eat to your meter. That means we test any food we eat until we know that it doesn't raise our blood glucose. Test before you eat to get a baseline. At 1 hour it should be at it's highest and at 2 hours it should be close to your baseline,. If it isn't then go over what you ate and find the high carb culprit. I have found that no matter what food you crave there is usually a low carb option. It also means you will have to make it yourself. Most prepackaged food is loaded with carbs.

 

Check back often and don't be afraid to ask any question you have. We've all been where you are and someone will be sure to answer

 

 

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stevenal

Welcome to the forum. You'll find good information here.

But glyburide, a sulfonyurea? As a first line of therapy? I'd be asking the doctor why, and why not metformin? Stimulating the release of insulin in the presence of insulin resistance has never made much sense to me. Metformin acts on the resistance part of the puzzle and doesn't contribute to cardiac risk. 

 

X2 on Dr. Bernstein. As I recall, he speaks of sulfonyureas extensively. Also search for "blood sugar 101." 

 

 

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Brian_W

Just don’t panic. Low carb as you can without going too low and start to work out. Hard. Although don’t start too hard. 

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Dave_KC

I was diagnosed in November of 2016 with an A1c of 12.6.  I immediately started Atkins style low carb, along with 1500 mg Metformin XR, and Januvia.  Three months in I was at 7.4 A1c, and six months at 5.0 (prompting 16 exclamation marks on my medical record at the clinic).  9 months in I was at 4.7, prompting the 30 something pregnant Nurse Practitioner to inform me that mine was lower than hers. and I lost the Januvia, and half the Metformin.  

 

At 12 months, it was 5.0, and I dropped all of the diabetic meds.  It's been 12 months later, and still no diabetic meds.  It takes time and patience.  

 

I will also say, I've moved from Atkins to a more restrictive Keto style low carb, moderate protein, high fat diet, and I'm maintaining the numbers.  

 

Hang in there, but also get serious on this.  You likely can see significant progress in the right direction.  

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MalteseMom
On 11/17/2018 at 5:37 PM, steel said:

Welcome to DF! I was Pre-D for a couple of years and crossed the arbitrary threshold into full T2D last month. It was quite disheartening at first, even though the Pre-D should've blunted the blow. I am thankful for all the excellent advice I got here. The first several weeks are the hardest IMO. Some tips from my experience and lessons learnt here:

 

1) BG takes a long time to get into the full blown type 2 diagnosis, for most people. So it's vital we understand it will take time to come down too. This is still the hardest for me, because as everyone said, the body holds on to status quo. It's best to expect small changes, a few points down in fasting numbers which are the hardest to reduce, a few points down in pp numbers, all of these small improvements add up over time and make a big difference in our control and overall health.

 

2) Goal setting, as mentioned above, is very important and requires flexibility also as Diabetes can be quite the emotional roller coaster as we adjust to it. It helps to expect that there will be times when unexpectedly and inexplicably you may miss the mark on your fasting or pp goals, as so many variables affect blood glucose some of which are not within our control. To learn what numbers to aim for, which medicines are safe, which diet has the best results with BG control and so many other questions you may have, check out Blood Sugar 101 by Jenny Ruhl. It's a life saver and such an indispensable guide on Diabetes management.

 

At first, my goal was to reduce my post meal numbers to 140 and below two hours after eating. As I continued to eat low carb, I was able to reduce my post meal numbers to 120-125 and below 2 hours after meals. All of this has been possible because I ate to my meter, which is to say regularly tested my blood sugar 1 and 2 hours after meals to see which foods spiked me, then I reduced the quantity or eliminated them altogether [substituted them with tasty alternatives] as dictated by the meter. It's overwhelming at first, but my meter has become one of my best friends in Diabetes management :).

 

My longer term goal is to get as close to 100 and below (like non diabetics) post meals and slowly lower fasting to 100 (I am still working on this and will be working on it for a long time), then 90s and 80s, basically to get numbers as close as we can to non diabetics. If we get our AICs in the 5% range, we reduce our risk of complications almost to non Diabetic levels though aiming for even better A1Cs is great. :)  You're already on Atkins, which is awesome!   Slow sustainable changes that are doable make the biggest difference.

 

Fixing sleep schedule, if needed, also helps as does adding moderate physical activity. All of this adds up to vastly improved control. A1C is an average, so it doesn't tell the full picture in that if you are having post meal spikes above 140, that's the point at which BG causes damage. So it's important to control those 1 and 2 hour most meal spikes even when A1Cs are getting in range.

 

3) Look around and read more on LCHF diets. This forum is a veritable goldmine of info, recipes, support and encouragement.

 

4) IMO we are fortunate to be diagnosed at a time where online communities such as this one exist. We have so much more access to resources, support, information..you name it. Studies done on Diabetic complications tended to study Diabetics that didn't have a fraction of the resources we do, who stuck to the awful fruits, whole grains, low fat recommendations made by the ADA and only saw worsening BG control and ended up with higher complication rates and worse outcomes.  As I have learnt here from the advice and wisdom of members, if we take care of ourselves, eat a reduced carb diet as dictated by our meter (some can eat higher carbs than others), try to get in some moderate physical activity most days of the week, we can be as healthy as anyone else and more. A lot of non Diabetics are not as proactive as Diabetes requires us to be, which I think helps us overall.

 

I am 30, so I was worried my life was over and horrible complications were inevitable. I know better now..it's not easy but it's one chronic illness where our choices and actions will largely dictate health outcomes. We are fortunate to have a fair bit of control over this and the know-how needed to maintain it. It's difficult but doable. It tests my patience, self compassion and equanimity often since I am still adjusting, but I am already feeling a lot better than I did right after diagnosis :).

 

Wishing you all the best. Stick around! This is such a great community.

 

 

 Thank you so much for taking the time to share all of this information. Because I am going to use it once a day and to turn my life around and keep moving forward so I have coffee  every morning with heavy whipping cream. I’ve been up about 15 minutes and had  a 17 ounce yeti mug of coffee with about 2 tablespoons of heavy whipping cream and my almost fasting BG is 123. So I’m going to use this Christmas Eve and these numbers to try to start over.  Besides all of you that encouraged me along the way to an a half years ago are use an app on my iPhone called my net diary – D. I was faithful in filling in the blanks and watching my numbers drop. So here I go! Now to find the proper topic to log my journey

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