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adiantum

2019 Morning Fasting BG Readings

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steel

both numbers were fasting..which one would be considered more accurate?

the 86 was after 9 hours of fasting and the 93 ..12 hours fasting.

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Fraser

Due to the margin of error in any reading or any meter. There is really very little difference between 86 and 93, 

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steel
1 hour ago, Fraser said:

Due to the margin of error in any reading or any meter. There is really very little difference between 86 and 93, 

That's very true. I've noticed that my fasting readings earlier in the morning (7-8 am) are  lower than the ones around 10-11 am. I think beyond meter variance, this might be because of liver dumps.

 

 

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LCD
On 1/5/2019 at 4:54 AM, Diana_CT said:

111

Over the holidays my weight crept up, now the battle begins to get it back down. 

Diana

I found out that I could gain one to two pounds for each day that I went off my diet. So, it's the same five to ten pounds, again for the up-teen time.

Then I will be back to my last goal (which I achieved today) and I will continue downword to my desired weight goal.   Libby

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adiantum

7.2

@LCD Congrats on reaching that goal. Ive got lots of work to do in that department.

So it's Monday , and I insist this week delivers fun times.

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Hammer
On 1/5/2019 at 9:07 PM, steel said:

That's very true. I've noticed that my fasting readings earlier in the morning (7-8 am) are  lower than the ones around 10-11 am. I think beyond meter variance, this might be because of liver dumps.

 

 

Steel, our insulin resistance varies throughout the day, so that results in our fasting BG levels varying throughout the day.  Also, as Fraser mentioned, you can take a BG reading, get the result, then take another BG reading immediately after the first reading, and get a different reading, and that's due to the accuracy of the meter that you're using.(plus or minus 15% is the tolerance of most meters today).  That means that you can actually have a BG level of 100, but with the tolerance of today's meters, you could get a meter reading of anywhere from 85 to 115.

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steel

97 this morning. <_<

 

@Hammer i was checking out your sig and got curious..may i know how long you were managing diabetes with diet and exercise and/or meds before using insulin? what prompted a move to insulin, as in do you agree with Dr. Bernstein that it's best to use insulin than to exhaust the pancreas with certain types of commonly prescribed diabetes meds?

 

Edited by steel

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Kit

106

 

And another flat tire.  Same one as before.  Same one that when I took it in for repair, they could not find a problem.

joy of joys.

 

Of course it handled two large commute days (120+miles) and Saturday without even the low pressure light coming on.  Then Sunday evening, totally flat.

 

Edited by Kit

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Ahnanimus

81. It's Motivation Monday for me. 

I'm seeking the motivation to take down the Christmas  decorations. Think I'll wait till the weekend and bribe my friends with breakfast in exchange for help.😁

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Hammer
11 hours ago, steel said:

97 this morning. <_<

 

@Hammer i was checking out your sig and got curious..may i know how long you were managing diabetes with diet and exercise and/or meds before using insulin? what prompted a move to insulin, as in do you agree with Dr. Bernstein that it's best to use insulin than to exhaust the pancreas with certain types of commonly prescribed diabetes meds?

 

Steel, when I was first diagnosed with diabetes, they put me on metformin, and that gave me severe diarrhea.  They tried every group of oral diabetes meds and they all gave me severe diarrhea, so I didn't take anything.  At that time, I didn't know about this forum, so I didn't know about using diet and exercise to control my diabetes.  I went for five years without doing anything for my diabetes, and at that point, I started developing neuropathy in my feet.(I'd get that "pins and needles" feeling in my toes when I was in bed).  I talked to my doctor's office and the nurse suggested that I try Lantus, which is a long lasting insulin that is used to lower your fasting glucose levels.  I decided to try it to see how it worked, then, the doctor suggested that I try using a fast acting insulin like Novolog to control my after meal spikes, so I did.  Soon after I started on both insulins, the "pins and needles" feeling in my toes went away and was replaced with pain....pain that came from the nerves in my toes being repaired.  That only lasted about two weeks.  My feet are now fine.

 

As for my opinion about using insulin, I agree with Dr. Bernstein....it's better to start using insulin sooner, rather than later, because if you can save some pancreatic function, that will help you maintain better BG control, than if you lost pancreatic function.  As long as your pancreas is still producing insulin, that amount of insulin will work with the injected insulin to maintain lower BG levels.  If you talk to type 1 diabetics who produce little to no insulin, they usually maintain higher BG levels than a type 2 on insulin, because they don't want to inject too much insulin and go too low.  When I inject insulin, I can take a lessor amount than I think I need, and a lot of the time, my pancreas will release insulin to keep my levels low.  If my pancreas no longer produced insulin, then I'd have to take a lessor amount of insulin before I ate, then two hours later, check my BG levels, and if they were still too high, I'd have to take a second, corrective shot of insulin.

 

Another thing to consider...insulin is more precise and much faster acting than oral meds or diet and exercise.  I've read here where someone eats something that they know they shouldn't and their BG levels go too high, it takes days before their oral meds or diet and exercise can get those levels back down again.  With insulin, I can get my BG levels down in a few hours.  For example, in the past few weeks, I've eaten something that I used to eat, but stayed away from because of the high carb content....broken pretzel pieces.  When I sit down with a bag of those, I usually eat the whole bag.  Knowing the carb content of the whole bag, I inject the appropriate amount of insulin.  Once I've finished the bag, I'll check my BG levels about two hours after I've finished the bag, and it's typically under 100.  A few hours later, I'll check my BG levels again, and it's typically in the 70's.  Considering that the whole bag contains 300 carbs, which is 6 times the number of carbs that I eat in one whole day, if it wasn't for insulin, my BG levels would be way off the charts....probably in the 400-500 range.

 

While I don't recommend doing this, technically you can eat whatever you want and take the appropriate amount of insulin to cover it, but doing that is dangerous.  The reason that it's dangerous is because, you don't know the actual carb content of the food.  While the package says XXX amount of carbs, that amount can vary.  On the bag of pretzels, it says that it contains 20 carbs in one half of a cup, and that the bag contains 15 cups.  Okay, that's 300 carbs, but suppose the bag only contains 14 cups, or that the 15th cup is crumbs that you don't eat.  Okay, so you took enough insulin for 15 cups (300 carbs), but in reality, there were only 14 cups (280 carbs.)  If your insulin to carb ratio was 1:4 (one unit of insulin for every 4 carbs you eat), then you'd have taken 75 units of insulin.  If there were only 280 carbs in the food, then you should have taken 70 units of insulin instead of 75.  Taking 5 extra units of insulin would send your BG levels way too low.

 

If instead, if you ate something that contained only 20 carbs, then you would take 5 units of insulin.  If instead, the food only had 16 carbs, then you should have taken 4 units of insulin, not 5, but taking 5 units is only 1 unit too much, and that one unit, while it might send your BG levels too low, they wouldn't be so low that it would hurt you, like the 5 extra units above would.  The fewer carbs you eat, the less insulin you need to take, making your chances of going too low remote.  Also, eating lots of carbs and taking lots of insulin will make you gain weight.  A lot of people avoid taking insulin because they've heard that it makes you gain weight.  Well, that's true, but only if you eat lots of carbs and take lots on insulin.  Since I've been on insulin, I've lost 85 pounds, but that's because I typically try to eat less than 50 carbs a day, so my insulin usage is low.

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adiantum

7.3

 

awww I missed Motivational Monday...I'll have a Tackle Tuesday & get some yard work done.

 

4 hours ago, Ahnanimus said:

81. It's Motivation Monday for me. 

I

 

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