Jump to content
Diabetes forums
  • Welcome To Diabetes Forums!

    Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today to contribute and support the site.

Sign in to follow this  
MJB

Does black coffee raise your BG?

Recommended Posts

MJB

My fasting BG at 7AM this morning was 145 which is usual for me as I always have dawn phenomenon. After taking my dogs out I ate a small cheese stick (0 carbs) and made a pot of coffee. I had 3 cups (black). About an hour later I took 500mg metformin and then I had 2 pork sausage patties and 2 fried eggs for breakfast (0 carbs).  About 11:30AM my BG was 173. No carbs, yet my BG went up considerably. For lunch at 12PM I had a slice of low carb cheesecake (almond crust) and then went for a 20 minute walk. At 4PM my BG was down to 111. Tomorrow I'm not drinking any coffee and we will see what happens.

 

Anyone else have black coffee, or other caffeine, raise your BG?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
steel

Hi MJB, I've read that caffeine raises BG in some people. So, it's not unusual.

I drink it rarely (and not very strong) because I get palpitations. I had some last night, but I didn't spike from it. 3 cups of black coffee may have impacted my BG.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
dowling gram

I have about 5 cups of coffee every day and it does nothing to my BG. It might raise some people's Bg but I Wouldn't know about that. I wonder if it was the length of time before you ate and exercise(walking the dogs) that raised your BG and not coffee.

 

When you exercise first the body uses up available blood glucose---you had none-- then the liver jumps in and releases stored glucose for energy so your BG goes up. Later on you ate some carbs and went for a walk. Your body had BG from the carbs you ate so it didn't effect your BG. Try eating a few carbs before you walk the dogs and see if that helps or if it really is the coffee.

 

I know when I overindulge in carbs and immediately ride the stationary bike or go for a short walk my BG. goes down

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MJB

No coffee today otherwise pretty much the same results. 11:30 AM BG was 151 so down a little from yesterday's level. I'm going to skip my afternoon walk today and see what my 4PM reading is. I don't think it's the coffee, I think just a liver dump of glucose. I may need to exercize more or maybe increase my met from the current 500 mg twice a day.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ran23

112 this morning, 124 after breakfast and a shower.   2-3 cups of black coffee, may look into this now. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kit

I've never had a rise from coffee or tea though I don't drink a lot of tea and I almost never touch coffee.

 

However, I will get a liver dump if I delay breakfast in the morning by more than about a half hour after getting up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Julies

HI, I am new here. I just got out of ICU and am now home. My BG was over 600 and A1C 14.8. I am now on insulin. I drink coffee as well and tomorrow I am going to forgo my coffee and test first. I too have Dawn Phenomenon (sp) with high numbers in  the morning. My vision also went from 2.75 to 5.00 (saw eye doc yesterday) I just need advice, I am a bit scared and want to get healthy. Thank you. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
adiantum

@Julies, Welcome to the forum.

Being scared is a good tool for you to start a  new  direction towards a health improvement.

We are all here for you & will give you every support possible.

 

You wouldve been having some terrible days with  an A1c that high , so be confident that you will feel heaps better when that comes down.

Do you have a blood glucose meter? You will need to test often to determine which foods you tolerate.

 

I drink coffee & I can cope with it. I dont recommend you give that up completely as that could also put you into stress.

Others will discuss insulin as all I can say is the less carbs you eat will mean the less insulin you will need.

 

Start counting carbs & at first I recommend 100g a day.

Foods high in carbs are grains, fruit, root vegetables, rice, pasta & candy.

Stir fries are a good meal choice as is  eggs, cheese, meat,fish & leafy greens.

 

We have many food choices available  to us it just takes time in the early stages to work what foods agree with you.

Please visit the forum often & ask any question you need.

 

~Lee

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
meyery2k

Julies - Welcome!  Following the advice here helped me get diabetes under control and I now live better than ever (I am 52).  Diet and exercise have profound influences on diabetes.  Don't worry, we aren't going to tell you to eat only grapefruits or run marathons :)

 

One big misconception about diabetes is diet.  Many believe that it means you can't eat sugar.  While that is true, there is a little bit more to it than that.  For some reason, Type 2 diabetics, have some problem with glucose control.  Glucose is a type of sugar that is the primary fuel for living organisms.  You need to have some glucose in your blood or you will die.  Too much glucose causes damage over a period of time.  This is good news because there is usually time to get a handle on things before you get serious complications.  If you are suffering complications, getting this under control can reduce or eliminate them.

 

Diet - Eliminate simple carbohydrates (grains, bread, pasta, rice, potatoes, root vegetables, and fruit).  Non root vegetables, avocados, nuts, butter, cream, avocado, olive oil, and cheese are some examples of food that is good for us.  At first, you might feel a little unwell as your body adjusts from being fueled primarily from carbohydrates to fat.  It lasts 2 weeks or so and once you get through it, you will feel better than ever.  Eating less carbohydrates will make using insulin much easier.  Don't fall for people telling you, "I can eat whatever I want and cover with insulin".  Do a little research on these forums and people that use insulin can explain why this is a fallacy.  You might also experience what we call false hypos were you feel really unwell for a short period of time.  What happens is that we become adapted to having high glucose and our body does not like it when it becomes lower.  This too, passes, but for some it can be a little concerning.

 

Exercise - If you are not active, just start with walking around the block or the park.  That's it.  Walk.  Exercise makes your muscles use glucose.  As you get stronger and more fit, either walk more, or look into some other activity you might like.

 

Vision - 600 is extreme.  As you get your numbers down, your vision might temporarily get worse.  This happened to me and it was frightening.  I am far-sighted and could not see the TV one day.  I found out that, as your glucose lowers, the shape of your eye changes.  Eventually, the vision stabilizes.  Be ready for this and don't run out to get a prescription based on this.  Eventually, my vision stabilized to a point where, while I still need cheap magnifier glasses for reading (this is from being 52 and not because of diabetes), my far vision is better than it has been in years.

 

Insulin - I don't need to use it but if I ever do, there is a ton of great advice here.  If you manage your glucose, you will find you need to use less of it.

 

Eat to your meter - This is crucial to learn how to live with diabetes.  It sucks at first but, as you learn how to modify your diet, you will have to test much less.  Do a search for this subject or if you need help with that, just ask.  This post is long enough as it is lol...

 

To close, we understand you are scared.  Eventually the people that succeed at this respect that they have diabetes but do not fear it.  A great deal has been learned and, thanks to forums like this, is available for all that look for it.  Many doctors (my own included) are skeptical about the low carb approach.  My philosophy from the beginning was that I could get the best advice from people that live with this.

 

There is a lot more I could comment upon, but this is enough to start.  I hope you will join us and become a long term member.  We have all been where you are and it can and does get better.  Ask us any questions you might have. ~ Mike

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.