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Harleyrider

Question about numbers and how to address them

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Harleyrider

New to forum - first post so be kind but honest LOL

I had a friend diagnosed with diabetes a little while ago so I decided to start monitoring my levels. last week, I bought a Contour Next meter and tested it twice the first morning I used it and my fasting levels were 93 and 90. I was satisfied but then read where those numbers could still be considered high as far as possible future issues so I stressed about it all day and night. The next morning the fasting levels were 103 and 100 and of course I stressed even more - three more days of fasting testing and the numbers averaged 102. I started testing several times during the day to get an idea and they were always in the mid 90s prior to a meal and mid to upper 90s 2 hours after a meal. I can test at random times of the day, and levels are ALWAYS under 100 (usually mid 90s) I even decided to drink a large Mountain Dew (with 75g of sugar) to see how my level was 2 hours later - It was 97. Levels before I go to bed are always 94-97. 

I’ m not looking for a diagnosis - just an idea on the numbers during morning and rest of day. My main concern is that it seems like my numbers are really good except the morning numbers - which seem to be in the lower end of prediabetes ( i know some folks don't consider that label but it is what the medical community is using) but all my other numbers are WAY below the prediabetes level. Should I be concerned or am I being overly worried?


I have struggled with worry and anxiety most of my adult life so wondering how much of a factor that would be on my numbers?

Also, if these fasting numbers are real, can my cutting out sweets, sodas, exercising and watching my carb intake get them back down?

 

BTW, I wrote my doctor and he told me not to worry too much about them but to take it as a wake up call to do better on things.  I have been bad about drinking sodas and eating sweets so he told me to cut out sodas and most sweets and start exercising better.  He said as long as I am hovering around the 100s that diet and exercise should be able to bring it back down to below 100.  Plus he said he felt the high fasting number could due to release fo cortisol due to my stress since my other numbers are so good.   .I am, 6’, 175 with no family history - about only risk factors are my age (59) and gender (male).  He also told me to stop testing so much as that was only driving up my anxiety which could affect my numbers - does that sound right?  He said to cut back on the sweets and sodas and watch my carbs and start a good exercise program and check them in a month and if they are still high to come in and have a A1C test done.  Based on that advice I had started walking 2 milesa  day and cycling 2 1/2 miles a day and have elimianted all sodas and sweets.  Seems it has may also have helped some with the anxiety.

Thanks

 

Bob

Edited by Harleyrider

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meyery2k

Bob - Welcome and you are asking good questions.

 

One test that you can perform at home that may offer some extra peace of mind would be the at home A1c.  CVS or Walgreen's usually have these for about $20 per test.  The A1c gives an estimated average of the last 90 days.  You do not need to fast, just make sure your hands are clean.

 

I would love to have numbers like yours after drinking a soda lol...

 

Morning numbers are generally the highest due to "dawn phenomenon".  The liver releases glucose into the bloodstream in anticipation of waking up.

 

I am sure you will get other information that will be helpful but this is a good example of how I work (am broken).

 

If I eat a dessert with sugar and test within an hour, my glucose will be 120-140.  After 2 hours, a normally functioning system would be about back to where it started.  In my case, I will still be 120-140.  In about 4 hours, I will then be back to where I started or even significantly lower (known as reactive hypoglycemia).  I am insulin resistant.  I make insulin but I don't use it as efficiently for some reason.

 

I did have clinical symptoms of type 2 diabetes but, with diet and exercise, I no longer present symptoms and have been told that it is currently in remission.  I am certain that if I went back to the standard western diet and became sedentary again, I would be clinical.

 

The lab numbers given as normal are considered statistical averages and you may just be on the high side of average.  My hemoglobin count is always a little below normal and I had to go through some diagnostic procedures to make sure there was no hidden bleeding.  There wasn't, and I just seem to run a little lower than normal.

 

It is believed that damage to organs begins when glucose rises to over 140.  I don't believe this is an absolute by any means but it does provide a number.

 

I would encourage you to follow the advice given.  It takes a little adjusting to the diet but I can say I eat better than I ever did.  Quantity and quality.

 

In closing, for comparison, I am a white male, age 52 with a significant amount of Native American ancestry (which presents a much higher risk for diabetes).  I used to be morbidly obese and sedentary when I presented with T2 diabetes.

 

Thank you for posting and we hope to see you around! ~ Mike

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Kit

Given the testing you have done, you might be experiencing some insulin resistance, though it is not bad enough to really call diabetes.

 

Yes, stress can raise your numbers, and that's may be why you started seeing increasing morning readings.

 

To be honest, cutting out sugary sodas, candy and other sweets, and overall fast and junk carbs would be good for everyone regardless of insulin resistance, diabetes, or similar.  I highly recommend it.  I don't think you would need to go as extreme as some of us do (I try to limit myself to 30g total carbs per day . . .that soda was over 2 days worth of carbs for me and oh boy I would not want to see what it would do to my numbers), but dropping low nutrient foods will certainly be of benefit.

 

I have a theory.  I have read a few places now that well over half the US population is hyperinsulinemia, or has higher than normal levels of circulating insulin.  As our cells are so often awash in insulin, we start becoming resistant to that insulin.  This causes insulin levels to run even higher, washing our cells in yet more insulin and thus making us even more resistant to it.  An official diabetes diagnosis doesn't come until our bodies can no longer produce enough insulin to override the resistance.  But, as you can see from the progression, the problem actually started long before blood glucose levels started to rise.

 

My theory is that some people may never develop diabetes even though all of the conditions are there where others will.  Perhaps this is a genetic factor.  While they say T2 diabetes isn't related to genetics, there are too many families with multiple members being diabetic to make me fully agree.  

 

Anyway, welcome to the group.  Kudos for being proactive and checking to see how you are reacting.  So many people instead choose to keep their heads buried in the sand even though they are well into diabetes.

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Harleyrider
1 hour ago, meyery2k said:

Bob - Welcome and you are asking good questions.

 

 

 

Morning numbers are generally the highest due to "dawn phenomenon".  The liver releases glucose into the bloodstream in anticipation of waking up.

 

Thank you for posting and we hope to see you around! ~ Mike

 

Thanks for the reply.  The doctor said I could do a fast during the day of at least 8 hours and see if my fasting number was lower - that would see if dawn phenomenon or stress at night was driving it up.  Does that sound logical? 

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meyery2k

That seems logical to me.  To make this even more fun, I believe the dawn phenomenon is also tied into our circadian rhythm.  We are used to getting up at a set time each day so our liver releases glucose before this time to prepare us for that.  I have awakened extra early and tested.  If I catch myself before DP then I usually test in the low to mid 80's. 

 

For what it is worth, I buy into Kit's theory.  I can accept that I may have broken myself in addition to having the genetic predisposition towards being broken.  For years, I simply ate too much food.  Mostly fast food and starches.

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Harleyrider

I think part of it may have been to calm me down form my anxiety LOL.  While he didn't downplay my morning numbers, he said that they should not worry me because they are still very close to 100 and the other numebrs are really good.  He wasn't ready to diagnose me with anything yet LOL

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PJ Lin
On 2/25/2019 at 7:39 AM, Harleyrider said:

Based on that advice I had started walking 2 milesa  day and cycling 2 1/2 miles a day and have elimianted all sodas and sweets.  Seems it has may also have helped some with the anxiety.

Thanks

 

Bob

1. You may have dawn phenomenon.

2. your other numbers are good.

3. A1C every 3 months should be enough unless you have anemia.

4. I am a PhD not MD, so above are just my opinions not advice.

5. Always get second opinion from another doctor if you have doubts.

Good luck.

 

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Harleyrider

I am now bicycling around 7 miles a day and have cut out virtually all sugars such as sweets and sodas.  My numbers are now running 91-93 in the morning, mid 90s prior to eating, mid to upper 90s two hours after eating and mid 90s at random testing.  I have a goal of getting under 90 fastingon a regular basis.

 

Bob

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PJ Lin
14 minutes ago, Harleyrider said:

I am now bicycling around 7 miles a day and have cut out virtually all sugars such as sweets and sodas.  My numbers are now running 91-93 in the morning, mid 90s prior to eating, mid to upper 90s two hours after eating and mid 90s at random testing.  I have a goal of getting under 90 fastingon a regular basis.

 

Bob

Bob...the great man.

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Hammer

Bob, your numbers are normal for a non-diabetic, especially your after meal numbers.  If your before meal numbers were in the 90's, and your after meal numbers are in the 90's, then those are the type of numbers that a non-diabetic would see.  The fact that you don't even approach 126, which is what doctors say is the line between a non-diabetic and a diabetic, shows that you don't have diabetes.

 

Also, good for you that you are limiting your carbs and exercising, as that not only helps to reduce your chances of developing type 2 diabetes, it will make you feel better, give you more energy, and get you in better shape.  A lot of us here adhere to a low carb/high fat (LC/HF) diet.  The fats we eat are the good fats, not the bad fats like polyunsaturated fats.  The good fats are....eating the skin on chicken, the fat on beef, using real butter, using olive oil liberally, eating avocados, etc.  By eating good fats, the fat will make you feel full, whereas if you avoid fats and limit your caloric intake, you will feel hungry all of the time.  This is why those diets that doctors put you on rarely ever work.  People will adhere to the doctor's diet for a while, but eventually, the person gets tired of being hungry all of the time, so they begin to stray from the diet, and end up gaining back all of the weight.

 

One last thing...and this is just my own theory, which I have proven to myself....Dawn Phenomenon is when your body releases glucose to wake you up in the morning and give you extra energy to get up.  Your body has a built in alarm clock that is created when you go to bed at the same time every night, and get up at the same time every day.  Your body adapts to that schedule, so a little before you would normally get up, your body's "alarm clock" causes your liver to release extra glucose in anticipation of your getting up.  My theory is that, if one night you go to bed later than you normally do, but get up at the normal time in the morning, that throws off your body's "alarm clock", so when your bedside alarm clock goes off, you wake up and you feel really groggy and out of it.  You just lay there, wishing that you had another hour to sleep.  I think that's due to the fact that your liver didn't release that extra glucose because your body's "alarm clock" wasn't expecting to get up at that time, it was expecting to get up after your normal number of hours of sleep, which you didn't get, since you went to bed later.  I have proven this on myself by taking my normal wake up BG readings like I always do, but after I've gotten my normal number of hours of sleep.  On those days where I wasn't able to get my normal number of hours of sleep, I woke up groggy, half asleep, and my BG levels were lower, which to me, indicated that that extra glucose hadn't been released yet.

 

Another thing that adds to my theory is that, while you drag yourself out of bed feeling groggy and half asleep, once you get up and start moving around...you take a shower, eat breakfast, etc., you feel fine.  That grogginess and half asleep feeling is gone, and that's because your liver has been releasing more glucose as you move around, giving you the energy to function properly.

 

To add to my theory, when you decide to sleep in, you stay in bed longer that you normally would, but your liver will still release that extra glucose to wake you up at the time that you would normally get up.  If you sleep in too long, you start getting antsy, and you end up feeling like you just can't lay there anymore, you just have to get up and start moving.  That's due to the extra glucose giving you all that energy that you aren't using by just lying there in bed.

 

Again this is just my theory, and there are no scientific studies to back my theory up (at least, none that I know of).

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