Jump to content
Diabetes forums
  • Welcome To Diabetes Forums!

    Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today to contribute and support the site.

teamzr1

Just told I have type 2 and stunned and dumb

Recommended Posts

teamzr1

Hi all,

I am a 68 year old male which was just told 3 days ago that I have type 2, idiot doctor just simply told me when my blood was analyzed that some number was like 310 !

He told me nothing else and simply prescribed  some  pill with  just1 refill of Metformin 500 MG 2 times a day.

I guess as soon as I told him I am on medical and social security. he sees no large profits and treats me as a lowlife ?

 

I am 5" 10" tall, weigh about 200 pounds. I live alone so this is over my head to wrap around as I went to hospital to be told I also have bronchitis and pneumonia !

I am still in shock about this and totally dummy where to even start other then I just ordered some books from Amazon, no clue if they are useful or not and some meter to stab myself for blood like a vampire

 

I read somewhere a clue to type 2 is when taking a leak that there is foamy bubbles.

heck I have seen this like for 2-3 years and just thought it was the cleaner for toilet, just how dumb I am

 

I never drank any type of booze including beer or wine. All I drank is like 6 bottles of water a day, maybe V8 or grapefruit juice in AM.

3 times a day I drank water with some fiber product

 

OK maybe boring you but if you could is start me off, tell me how to know by how I feel is low or high values,

where is some info to tell me what all I can or cannot eat.?

Maybe what off the self products I should use like drinks for type 2 people ?

 

Clueless and need your experience !

 

Thanks  JR

 

 

Edited by teamzr1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
meyery2k

JR - Welcome.  Getting diagnosed with diabetes can be a bit overwhelming at first.  There are many things you can do that will help.

 

Many of us have had great success with a low carb/high fat diet.  Fat is not the bad thing you have been told it was.  Carbohydrates, especially simple ones, are broken down into glucose which you already have enough of.  Exercise can help too.  Many of us have been able to stop medication and control diabetes with diet and exercise alone.  Everyone has different circumstances so, as it is said, your mileage may vary.

 

Changing to a low carb diet may seem a little tough at first.  Start reading labels and try to plan your meals so you consume no more than 100 grams of carbs a day.  Cut out rice, potatoes, pasta, bread, sugar, and fruit.  The carbs you consume should come primarily from non-root vegetables like kale, zucchini, broccoli, cauliflower, and so on.

 

Good sources of protein are chicken, fish, nuts, cheeses, and beef if you eat meat.

 

It is OK to use butter, cream, and cheese to fill you up.

 

Metformin acts upon your liver to stop it from dumping glucose into your bloodstream.  It can also reduce insulin resistance which many of us Type 2s have.

 

Be patient, it will take a little time to get things moving in the right direction.  Fortunately complications from diabetes take a long time to develop so you have time to act.

 

You will get plenty of posts and lots of good advice.

 

One thing you will want to get started on is getting a meter and enough strips to test several times a day.  The doctor might just say once a day in the morning but you want to test before you eat, and then 2 hours after you eat.  After 2 hours your goal would be to be around where you started.  We call this eating to your meter and it will help you figure out a diet that is right for you.

 

To best answer what you can eat.  This is a sample of a daily meal for me.

 

Breakfast - 3 pieces bacon, non-root vegetables cooked in the grease seasoned with salt, pepper, garlic, and onion powder.  I mix in a Tbsp. of sour cream.  2 eggs cooked in butter with cheese, coffee,  almond or cashew milk with cream and sweetener.

 

Lunch - Large salad with dressing or protein with mixed vegetables or a small salad.  Sometimes nuts and cheese for a protein.  I try to eat one meatless meal a day.  

 

Dinner - Usually a protein and a salad.  Sometimes a few berries and cream for dessert.  Sometimes some no sugar added ice cream.  Coffee.

 

I have maintained a steady weight on this diet for 2 years now.  All my lab work is great.  I was prescribed Metformin in the beginning but I no longer have to take it.

 

You don't have to kill yourself with exercise.  Walking is good.

 

I hope you stick around.  I got the advice I needed here to help me.

 

In closing, did you know if they did an A1c test and what the result was?

 

Mike

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
adiantum

Hi JR, Welcome to the forum.

 

Like you, I had no idea what diabetes was & what to eat etc & that was 11 years ago .

I googled D & was directed here  that same day of diagnosis & swear its the best direction in life that Ive ever followed.

I'm not into exercising  & have found yard work & walking the dog is enough for me.

 

Reading what others here are eating  has also been a great guide that Ive been able to tweak to suit my preferences.

 

You dont have to have control perfected by tomorrow, but do reduce your intake of carbs .

Dont adopt the fear campaign that fat &  eggs are bad for you.

 

Log in often, we are all here to support you.

Lee

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
dowling gram

Hi teamzr1 and welcome to the forum

Diabetes is not a death sentence. You can live quite well and even thrive with it. A low carb/high fat diet is the most important factor in controlling your blood glucose. It will take work to find out what foods raise your blood glucose. It includes testing and giving up many of the foods you are used to eating like all prepackaged foods which means you will have to cook most of what you eat. If you want a little help look up the keto diet. It is a low carb/high fat diet but you still must test to find out what diet is best for you. Every diabetic is different. What I can eat will be different than what you can eat. Some here limit their carbs to 30 a day. I eat about 100 a day.

 

My LC/HF diet allowed me to lose 40 pounds in quick order. I found I had more energy and felt better than I had in years before.

 

The books you ordered may be useless. There are lots of books but there are a couple that may help. Dr. Bernsteins "The diabetic solution" and "think like a Pancreas"

 

Check out our recipe section and there are lots of low carb websites that may help. Eventually you will find that there are substitutions for most foods you like or you may find you don't crave or even like your old diet selections.

 

Do some reading of old posts and check back often with any questions you may have. Someone is sure to answer

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kit

Hi @teamzr1, welcome to the group.

 

In all honesty, most GPs don't really know all that much about diabetes.  Did your doctor say anything about a referral to a nutritionist or diabetes educator?  They are usually the ones who give your more information, get you setup with a meter, and similar.  Not that my opinion on their nutritional advice is very high, but at least that's where you usually get started.

 

Testing your BG levels really is important.  You can't "guess" based on how you feel or outward symptoms.  Your numbers can actually be quite high with no symptoms.  On the other side, you can feel like you are having a low when your numbers are still quite high (false hypo).  Your meter is the only way you can tell for sure on what is going on.

 

So, since you didn't get much of any information, here's some to get you started.

 

Goals - it can be difficult to determine what all you need to do if you don't know what your goals should be or even what tests are relevant to determining how your control is doing.

 

An HbA1C (often referred to as your A1C) is a test to find out how much hemoglobin has become bonded with glucose.  Given the average lifespan of hemoglobin is around three months, this gives an idea of your average BG levels over the course of around 3 months.

A non diabetic A1C will usually be around 4-5.6.  I've seen variations in those numbers, but that's a pretty average range.

According to the CDC, chances for diabetic complications drop to that of non diabetics with an A1C under 6.0.

 

So, I personally see this as the minimum goal, to have an A1C of under 6.0.  The following BG (blood glucose) numbers are usually target.

Under 100 fasting and before meals.

Under 140 1 hour after your first bite.

Under 120 2 hours after your first bite.

 

A diabetes educator is going to give you higher targets.  You could be like me and have your doctor argue that there is no reason for your A1C to ever be below 7.0.  Don't believe them.  There is a lot of history and in my opinion bad decisions behind the ADA (American Diabetes Association) guidelines.  But they can work well as intermediate goals.

 

Now many of us here practice something called eating to your meter.  What this means is that we take our BG reading before we start eating and then again at around 2 hours.  There will be times when you might want to test as, well, other times.  But before and two hours after is a good place to start.

 

If the after meal reading is outside your goals, you then know that your body did not react the way you want from that meal.  You can either write that option off, or make adjustments to it and try again.  This way you build up a list basically of what you react well to and what you don't react well to.

 

Like @dowling gram said above, limiting yourself to 100g of carbohydrates a day is a good starting point.  This does limit you, but not quite as extreme and some.  I happen to be one of those who limits herself to 30g of carbohydrates per day.  You can then raise or lower that amount based upon the results you are seeing in your testing.

 

If you haven't been able to tell from the above, I am a huge proponent to self testing.  Not testing, especially right after diagnosis, is like trying to land a plane on a cloudy and foggy night with no instruments and all the running lights off.  Or think of it as trying to drive a car wearing a blindfold with the stereo turned up full blast.

 

You mentioned you already bought a meter, but there are some factors here you should be aware of.

 

For the most part, meters are pretty cheap and many companies will pretty much give them away.

 

You will also need a lancing device, which is sounds like you also purchased and lancets.  The lancets are the needle portion and get changed out periodically.  How often is up to you.  Some will say change it every time you use it.  I personally change mine about once a month when I start noticing the needle portion is getting a bit dull.  I bought a box of 100 lancets when I was diagnosed in Jan 2014 and I'm still working my way through the same box.  I expect it to last me a few more years before I am ready to buy another.

 

And then there are strips.  In almost all cases, the strips cost and arm, a leg, and your first born child for 50.  Test yourself 6 times a day and you will see how fast you can eat through the money.  This is why its so important that your diabetes educator or doctor write you a prescription for strip.  This way your insurance will cover most of the cost and it won't drive you to the poor house.  This is also why the companies who make meters pretty much give the meters away.  Once you have the meter, you are stuck using their strips.  So push for that prescription.  Your insurance company will also have a specific meter they will cover.  You want to make sure that is what you are using so they will cover the cost.

 

I recommend, at least early on, that you get at least 100 strips per month.  That will allow you to test three times a day, with a few left over in case of fill error, need to retake, or similar.  I consider this to be the bare minimum.

 

Now there are a couple of other options.  Walmart makes the ReliOn Prime meter.  Its around $18 for the meter and $9 for 50 strips.  Given my copay was $30 and neither my doctor or insurance company wanted to to test very often, that $30 covered 25 strips.  That's not even once per day.  So I said to heck with them, bought a ReliOn Prime, and have never looked back.  I believe CVS also carries a meter with similar priced strips, but I have never tried it myself.

 

Now comes food.  There are three macronutrients (four if you count alcohol, but we won't go there now).  Fats, carbohydrates, and protein.  The body turns carbohydrates into glucose, so that is the macronutrient you will want to pay the most attention to as it will have the greatest affect on your BG numbers.  Excess dietary protein can be converted by the body into glucose, but the process is inefficient and I have honestly never been able to eat enough protein in one sitting to make much of a difference here.  And then there's fats.  Dietary fat has next to no affect what so ever.  This is the reason you will see many of us eating a lchf (low carb high fat moderate protein) diet.  Some, like myself, even go so far as a ketogenic diet, which I personally have had excellent results with.

 

Definitely take a look at our Dieting and Nutrition section.  There's a lot of excellent information in there, especially the Recipe sub section.

https://www.diabetesforums.com/forums/forum/8-dieting-and-nutrition-for-diabetes/

 

Please feel free to ask any questions you might have.  The only stupid question is the one left unasked.  There is a ton of first had experience in this group.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
teamzr1
13 hours ago, meyery2k said:

Hi Mike

Thanks to all other who have nicely replied !

Problem with also having bronchitis and pneumonia !  and this type 2, how ill I feel, this is way too much info to get my fogged up brain

Doctor and hospital I called, total numb nuts and no help in all as even the meds they have me take is not working too well and only getting 2-4 hours of sleep and being so sick ( worst ever in my 68 years) living alone just  sucks

I cannot even cook eggs without screwing it up so I eat the frozen junk and no idea of what is in it is good or bad

 

I should have the test tool arrive today but again in my fogged up mind will be a task and even writing forum posts is a task

 

I will read each of all the members sent me little by little and respond

 

All they did was a blood test and said I had type 2 and some number like 310, they did no other testing

not even analyze the pee they had me put in a bottle I noticed they never even looked at it

 

Thanks again

Teamzr1

13 hours ago, meyery2k said:

JR - Welcome.  Getting diagnosed with diabetes can be a bit overwhelming at first.  There are many things you can do that will help.

 

Many of us have had great success with a low carb/high fat diet.  Fat is not the bad thing you have been told it was.  Carbohydrates, especially simple ones, are broken down into glucose which you already have enough of.  Exercise can help too.  Many of us have been able to stop medication and control diabetes with diet and exercise alone.  Everyone has different circumstances so, as it is said, your mileage may vary.

 

Changing to a low carb diet may seem a little tough at first.  Start reading labels and try to plan your meals so you consume no more than 100 grams of carbs a day.  Cut out rice, potatoes, pasta, bread, sugar, and fruit.  The carbs you consume should come primarily from non-root vegetables like kale, zucchini, broccoli, cauliflower, and so on.

 

Good sources of protein are chicken, fish, nuts, cheeses, and beef if you eat meat.

 

It is OK to use butter, cream, and cheese to fill you up.

 

Metformin acts upon your liver to stop it from dumping glucose into your bloodstream.  It can also reduce insulin resistance which many of us Type 2s have.

 

Be patient, it will take a little time to get things moving in the right direction.  Fortunately complications from diabetes take a long time to develop so you have time to act.

 

You will get plenty of posts and lots of good advice.

 

One thing you will want to get started on is getting a meter and enough strips to test several times a day.  The doctor might just say once a day in the morning but you want to test before you eat, and then 2 hours after you eat.  After 2 hours your goal would be to be around where you started.  We call this eating to your meter and it will help you figure out a diet that is right for you.

 

To best answer what you can eat.  This is a sample of a daily meal for me.

 

Breakfast - 3 pieces bacon, non-root vegetables cooked in the grease seasoned with salt, pepper, garlic, and onion powder.  I mix in a Tbsp. of sour cream.  2 eggs cooked in butter with cheese, coffee,  almond or cashew milk with cream and sweetener.

 

Lunch - Large salad with dressing or protein with mixed vegetables or a small salad.  Sometimes nuts and cheese for a protein.  I try to eat one meatless meal a day.  

 

Dinner - Usually a protein and a salad.  Sometimes a few berries and cream for dessert.  Sometimes some no sugar added ice cream.  Coffee.

 

I have maintained a steady weight on this diet for 2 years now.  All my lab work is great.  I was prescribed Metformin in the beginning but I no longer have to take it.

 

You don't have to kill yourself with exercise.  Walking is good.

 

I hope you stick around.  I got the advice I needed here to help me.

 

In closing, did you know if they did an A1c test and what the result was?

 

Mike

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
teamzr1
12 hours ago, adiantum said:

Thanks for the reply Lee

Maybe other here understand the only other info doctor reported

Blood pressure : 165/78

Oxygen saturation : 92%

Temp (oral) 96.4 deg

Pulse : 85

Respiration : 16

and he said something as to type 2 a value like 310ish which he said was way to high but did not hear what the value name

Getting only 2-4 hours max since early Feb so mind is pretty fogging and forgetting, plus lots of coughing and gagging crap up from other 

illness and not wanting to eat, this all sucks 😞

 

Thanks again Lee

 

12 hours ago, adiantum said:

 

Hi JR, Welcome to the forum.

 

Like you, I had no idea what diabetes was & what to eat etc & that was 11 years ago .

I googled D & was directed here  that same day of diagnosis & swear its the best direction in life that Ive ever followed.

I'm not into exercising  & have found yard work & walking the dog is enough for me.

 

Reading what others here are eating  has also been a great guide that Ive been able to tweak to suit my preferences.

 

You dont have to have control perfected by tomorrow, but do reduce your intake of carbs .

Dont adopt the fear campaign that fat &  eggs are bad for you.

 

Log in often, we are all here to support you.

Lee

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
teamzr1
1 hour ago, Kit said:

Kit thank-you for all the info, now I have to understand all it means

As to testing, will be a real issue, due to lots of things happen when a child has followed me all my life as I hate needles

and stabbing myself daily to monitoring will be tough to overcome and try to do

I will add more to your reply when I can

1 hour ago, Kit said:

 

Hi @teamzr1, welcome to the group.

 

In all honesty, most GPs don't really know all that much about diabetes.  Did your doctor say anything about a referral to a nutritionist or diabetes educator?  They are usually the ones who give your more information, get you setup with a meter, and similar.  Not that my opinion on their nutritional advice is very high, but at least that's where you usually get started.

 

Testing your BG levels really is important.  You can't "guess" based on how you feel or outward symptoms.  Your numbers can actually be quite high with no symptoms.  On the other side, you can feel like you are having a low when your numbers are still quite high (false hypo).  Your meter is the only way you can tell for sure on what is going on.

 

So, since you didn't get much of any information, here's some to get you started.

 

Goals - it can be difficult to determine what all you need to do if you don't know what your goals should be or even what tests are relevant to determining how your control is doing.

 

An HbA1C (often referred to as your A1C) is a test to find out how much hemoglobin has become bonded with glucose.  Given the average lifespan of hemoglobin is around three months, this gives an idea of your average BG levels over the course of around 3 months.

A non diabetic A1C will usually be around 4-5.6.  I've seen variations in those numbers, but that's a pretty average range.

According to the CDC, chances for diabetic complications drop to that of non diabetics with an A1C under 6.0.

 

So, I personally see this as the minimum goal, to have an A1C of under 6.0.  The following BG (blood glucose) numbers are usually target.

Under 100 fasting and before meals.

Under 140 1 hour after your first bite.

Under 120 2 hours after your first bite.

 

A diabetes educator is going to give you higher targets.  You could be like me and have your doctor argue that there is no reason for your A1C to ever be below 7.0.  Don't believe them.  There is a lot of history and in my opinion bad decisions behind the ADA (American Diabetes Association) guidelines.  But they can work well as intermediate goals.

 

Now many of us here practice something called eating to your meter.  What this means is that we take our BG reading before we start eating and then again at around 2 hours.  There will be times when you might want to test as, well, other times.  But before and two hours after is a good place to start.

 

If the after meal reading is outside your goals, you then know that your body did not react the way you want from that meal.  You can either write that option off, or make adjustments to it and try again.  This way you build up a list basically of what you react well to and what you don't react well to.

 

Like @dowling gram said above, limiting yourself to 100g of carbohydrates a day is a good starting point.  This does limit you, but not quite as extreme and some.  I happen to be one of those who limits herself to 30g of carbohydrates per day.  You can then raise or lower that amount based upon the results you are seeing in your testing.

 

If you haven't been able to tell from the above, I am a huge proponent to self testing.  Not testing, especially right after diagnosis, is like trying to land a plane on a cloudy and foggy night with no instruments and all the running lights off.  Or think of it as trying to drive a car wearing a blindfold with the stereo turned up full blast.

 

You mentioned you already bought a meter, but there are some factors here you should be aware of.

 

For the most part, meters are pretty cheap and many companies will pretty much give them away.

 

You will also need a lancing device, which is sounds like you also purchased and lancets.  The lancets are the needle portion and get changed out periodically.  How often is up to you.  Some will say change it every time you use it.  I personally change mine about once a month when I start noticing the needle portion is getting a bit dull.  I bought a box of 100 lancets when I was diagnosed in Jan 2014 and I'm still working my way through the same box.  I expect it to last me a few more years before I am ready to buy another.

 

And then there are strips.  In almost all cases, the strips cost and arm, a leg, and your first born child for 50.  Test yourself 6 times a day and you will see how fast you can eat through the money.  This is why its so important that your diabetes educator or doctor write you a prescription for strip.  This way your insurance will cover most of the cost and it won't drive you to the poor house.  This is also why the companies who make meters pretty much give the meters away.  Once you have the meter, you are stuck using their strips.  So push for that prescription.  Your insurance company will also have a specific meter they will cover.  You want to make sure that is what you are using so they will cover the cost.

 

I recommend, at least early on, that you get at least 100 strips per month.  That will allow you to test three times a day, with a few left over in case of fill error, need to retake, or similar.  I consider this to be the bare minimum.

 

Now there are a couple of other options.  Walmart makes the ReliOn Prime meter.  Its around $18 for the meter and $9 for 50 strips.  Given my copay was $30 and neither my doctor or insurance company wanted to to test very often, that $30 covered 25 strips.  That's not even once per day.  So I said to heck with them, bought a ReliOn Prime, and have never looked back.  I believe CVS also carries a meter with similar priced strips, but I have never tried it myself.

 

Now comes food.  There are three macronutrients (four if you count alcohol, but we won't go there now).  Fats, carbohydrates, and protein.  The body turns carbohydrates into glucose, so that is the macronutrient you will want to pay the most attention to as it will have the greatest affect on your BG numbers.  Excess dietary protein can be converted by the body into glucose, but the process is inefficient and I have honestly never been able to eat enough protein in one sitting to make much of a difference here.  And then there's fats.  Dietary fat has next to no affect what so ever.  This is the reason you will see many of us eating a lchf (low carb high fat moderate protein) diet.  Some, like myself, even go so far as a ketogenic diet, which I personally have had excellent results with.

 

Definitely take a look at our Dieting and Nutrition section.  There's a lot of excellent information in there, especially the Recipe sub section.

https://www.diabetesforums.com/forums/forum/8-dieting-and-nutrition-for-diabetes/

 

Please feel free to ask any questions you might have.  The only stupid question is the one left unasked.  There is a ton of first had experience in this group.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
teamzr1
11 hours ago, dowling gram said:

Thanks dowling gram for teaching me up on this type 2 crap

 

I will respond to you again for sure

 

Hi teamzr1 and welcome to the forum

Diabetes is not a death sentence. You can live quite well and even thrive with it. A low carb/high fat diet is the most important factor in controlling your blood glucose. It will take work to find out what foods raise your blood glucose. It includes testing and giving up many of the foods you are used to eating like all prepackaged foods which means you will have to cook most of what you eat. If you want a little help look up the keto diet. It is a low carb/high fat diet but you still must test to find out what diet is best for you. Every diabetic is different. What I can eat will be different than what you can eat. Some here limit their carbs to 30 a day. I eat about 100 a day.

 

My LC/HF diet allowed me to lose 40 pounds in quick order. I found I had more energy and felt better than I had in years before.

 

The books you ordered may be useless. There are lots of books but there are a couple that may help. Dr. Bernsteins "The diabetic solution" and "think like a Pancreas"

 

Check out our recipe section and there are lots of low carb websites that may help. Eventually you will find that there are substitutions for most foods you like or you may find you don't crave or even like your old diet selections.

 

Do some reading of old posts and check back often with any questions you may have. Someone is sure to answer

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
dowling gram

teamzr1

Anyone can cook it just takes following directions and  paying attention to what you are doing. My son when he was younger compared cooking to a science experiment. Follow the directions and pay attention to what you are doing. Those prepackaged frozen meals are full of carbs. You may not feel up to it right now but if you can lower your blood glucose it may make you feel better. For now stock up on salads, If you like raw veggies get some and use ranch dressing for a dip. Cucumbers and ranch dip is a favorite treat in summer for me. Get sugar free jello--you can buy it already made up-- and nuts. A deli whole chicken is a good way to get protein without extra carbs and cheese is another. When you are feeling better you can start on your cooking journey

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kit
1 hour ago, teamzr1 said:

As to testing, will be a real issue, due to lots of things happen when a child has followed me all my life as I hate needles

and stabbing myself daily to monitoring will be tough to overcome and try to do

 

If done right, you barely even notice the finger pricks and I honestly suffer far worse pulling weeds in the yard.  Some of those thorns can HURT!  The trick is to use the side of your fingers and not the pad.  Also you want to use the shallowest needle depth that will allow you to get a sample.  When they do it at the doctor's office I swear they have it set to drill for oil and they always insist on doing it on the pad of the finger.  A guarantee it is going to hurt.  Some meters will also allow you to use alternate testing sites, like your arm.  Personally I tried this, but I had to set the lancet so deep to get blood that it was much worse than the fingers.

 

The number you quoted was most likely your BG (blood glucose) reading.  Over 300 is very high.  They estimated I was spending most of my time in the 200s and 300s when I was diagnosed as well.

 

As for food, I can't recommend enough to avoiding as much processed food as possible.  You have no control over what is in it and its usually full of stuff you don't want to eat.  That said however, Atkins does have a line of frozen meals that have been BG friendly to me (at least the ones I have tried).  I don't recommend using them as a staple, but I usually have a few in my freezer for those late nights at the office and similar.  I've found just about every grocery store in my area carries at least some of the line.  I also make use of the Atkins shakes here and there in the mornings.  I'm not very functional in the mornings and so they are an option for me when I either can't figure out breakfast or just don't have any time to do so.

 

I also found I can make quick and easy soups that are friendly.  I use broth from cartons (I prefer the taste of low sodium ones).  Toss in a pot with some vegetables and protein, and simmer until everything is done to your liking.  You can also do a quick and easy egg drop soup this way.  Simmer chicken broth, add in some soy sauce and any other flavorings you might like.  Then drizzle in a couple of beaten eggs while you stir.  The egg sets pretty much immediately and its ready to eat.  Very BG friendly as long as you are making it yourself.  I've been known to make a soup from beef broth, sliced up pre cooked sausage link, raw spinach, raw mushrooms, and lots of black pepper in the microwave in the bowl I plan to eat it out of.  Its treated me well when I'm not feeling up to snuff and takes very little effort.

 

Hope you get to feeling better soon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
teamzr1
1 hour ago, Kit said:

Tough for me as I ruin boiling water

If you hear screaming via cyber space as the meter should be to my some time today as I stab myself 🙂

BTW how do you know if the meter reports correctly ?

 

This is the one I ordered

Contour NEXT Diabetes Testing Kit, 100 Count | Contour NEXT EZ Meter, 100 Contour NEXT Test Strips, 100 Lancets, Lancing Device, Control Solution, Manuals, Log Book & Carry Case

 

Good or junk ?

 

Thanks all !

1 hour ago, Kit said:

If done right, you barely even notice the finger pricks and I honestly suffer far worse pulling weeds in the yard.  Some of those thorns can HURT!  The trick is to use the side of your fingers and not the pad.  Also you want to use the shallowest needle depth that will allow you to get a sample.  When they do it at the doctor's office I swear they have it set to drill for oil and they always insist on doing it on the pad of the finger.  A guarantee it is going to hurt.  Some meters will also allow you to use alternate testing sites, like your arm.  Personally I tried this, but I had to set the lancet so deep to get blood that it was much worse than the fingers.

 

The number you quoted was most likely your BG (blood glucose) reading.  Over 300 is very high.  They estimated I was spending most of my time in the 200s and 300s when I was diagnosed as well.

 

As for food, I can't recommend enough to avoiding as much processed food as possible.  You have no control over what is in it and its usually full of stuff you don't want to eat.  That said however, Atkins does have a line of frozen meals that have been BG friendly to me (at least the ones I have tried).  I don't recommend using them as a staple, but I usually have a few in my freezer for those late nights at the office and similar.  I've found just about every grocery store in my area carries at least some of the line.  I also make use of the Atkins shakes here and there in the mornings.  I'm not very functional in the mornings and so they are an option for me when I either can't figure out breakfast or just don't have any time to do so.

 

I also found I can make quick and easy soups that are friendly.  I use broth from cartons (I prefer the taste of low sodium ones).  Toss in a pot with some vegetables and protein, and simmer until everything is done to your liking.  You can also do a quick and easy egg drop soup this way.  Simmer chicken broth, add in some soy sauce and any other flavorings you might like.  Then drizzle in a couple of beaten eggs while you stir.  The egg sets pretty much immediately and its ready to eat.  Very BG friendly as long as you are making it yourself.  I've been known to make a soup from beef broth, sliced up pre cooked sausage link, raw spinach, raw mushrooms, and lots of black pepper in the microwave in the bowl I plan to eat it out of.  Its treated me well when I'm not feeling up to snuff and takes very little effort.

 

Hope you get to feeling better soon.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kit
40 minutes ago, teamzr1 said:

BTW how do you know if the meter reports correctly ?

 

This is the one I ordered

Contour NEXT Diabetes Testing Kit, 100 Count | Contour NEXT EZ Meter, 100 Contour NEXT Test Strips, 100 Lancets, Lancing Device, Control Solution, Manuals, Log Book & Carry Case

 

Good or junk ?

 

Thanks all !

 

 

Don't go down the rabbit hole.  There are no 100% accurate meters on the market.  There are no 100% accurate meters at doctor's offices or hospitals.  I work in an industry where I work with a lot of measurement equipment.  One device we have cost about the price of my house.  The cost to have it re calibrated and re certified every year is more than I paid for my new 4 door sedan car.  While it is very accurate, it is not 100% accurate.  And it is used to calibrate and certify lower end devices.

 

What you are looking for right now are trends.  What was I before my meal?  Did I rise too much after?  (I normally try for under a 20 point spread in 2 hours).  As you go you will gain more experience and start to be able to correlate your meter readings with your lab tests.  I suspect my meter runs a little high as my A1C is usually a little lower than I would expect from my meter readings.

 

I don't have experience with that meter, so I can't say one way or other on its performance.  There may be others here that can.  It sounds like you got the starter kit, which should have everything you need to get started.  But, as I said before, don't let yourself head down that rabbit hole.  It will drive you batty.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
teamzr1
53 minutes ago, Kit said:

Hi Kit

I am too techie, spent about 20 years in Silicon Valley, SJ Ca

and ran a testlab so I always question test tools and if they work as they claim

I just wonder since sticking bloody strips into the tool that that alone could effect test results ?

Do these tools allow some re-calibration ?

What is the control fluid the kit comes with, is that allowing to calibrate ?

OK I will do as you say and stick with the tool I should get delivered today

 

Don't worry folks, If I can can bit better and can think a lot more clearer I should be a fast leaner 🙂

 

53 minutes ago, Kit said:

Don't go down the rabbit hole.  There are no 100% accurate meters on the market.  There are no 100% accurate meters at doctor's offices or hospitals.  I work in an industry where I work with a lot of measurement equipment.  One device we have cost about the price of my house.  The cost to have it re calibrated and re certified every year is more than I paid for my new 4 door sedan car.  While it is very accurate, it is not 100% accurate.  And it is used to calibrate and certify lower end devices.

 

What you are looking for right now are trends.  What was I before my meal?  Did I rise too much after?  (I normally try for under a 20 point spread in 2 hours).  As you go you will gain more experience and start to be able to correlate your meter readings with your lab tests.  I suspect my meter runs a little high as my A1C is usually a little lower than I would expect from my meter readings.

 

I don't have experience with that meter, so I can't say one way or other on its performance.  There may be others here that can.  It sounds like you got the starter kit, which should have everything you need to get started.  But, as I said before, don't let yourself head down that rabbit hole.  It will drive you batty.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kit
2 hours ago, teamzr1 said:

Hi Kit

I am too techie, spent about 20 years in Silicon Valley, SJ Ca

and ran a testlab so I always question test tools and if they work as they claim

 

I just wonder since sticking bloody strips into the tool that that alone could effect test results ?

Do these tools allow some re-calibration ?

What is the control fluid the kit comes with, is that allowing to calibrate ?

OK I will do as you say and stick with the tool I should get delivered today

 

Don't worry folks, If I can can bit better and can think a lot more clearer I should be a fast leaner 🙂

 

 

 

Ah, another with experience in the field.

 

I am not aware of any home meters that can be calibrated.

 

Here's a link with more details.

https://onedrop.today/blogs/blog/accuracy-blood-glucose-meter

 

A point to note.  While the ReliOn Prime "failed" their test, so too did the only meter and strips my insurance company will cover, the OneTouch Verio.

 

A bit of personal experience, my particular meter is pretty stable in its readings.  If, for some reason I retake my reading, it will normally be within a few points of the first reading.  I personally prize stability over accuracy.  For example, I suspect my meter reads a little high, but it does so consistently.  So I just adjust my expectations regarding my readings.  Well ok, I admit I did not adjust my expectations, mostly because I like the results it gives me.  :D  However if I was getting a wide range of values on retakes, especially with the same drop of blood, then that is more difficult to adjust for.

 

If you look in the meter manual when you get it, you will see instructions about the control solution.  I believe that the solution is set for a certain level and the meter is considered good if it lands within a certain range.  I don't remember the range off hand, but I remember it being pretty large.  But then that was about 5 years ago so my memory is pretty fuzzy. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
teamzr1
41 minutes ago, Kit said:

Hi Kit,

sounds like you like sticking yourself lots of times per day 🙂

The monitor I ordered just got here at 6 PM and 53 page booklet just on using it so not trying to use it tonight

Al least the webpage you directed me to shows the Coutour Next model I bought passed those limited tests

This whole type 2 sounds like a lot of BS on whole subject

 

Cannot believe  as important as a life is the FDA allows for a +/- spread of 40%

 

Wonder if this is done so that people instead of own testing goes and pays doctors to do the same testing and their

tool not any better then off the self types ?

Interesting I was a Walmart first and almost bought the  ones they sell only to  see failed the tests you  pointed me to

 

So many thanks on that URL

 

Quote

Ah, another with experience in the field.

 

I am not aware of any home meters that can be calibrated.

 

Here's a link with more details.

https://onedrop.today/blogs/blog/accuracy-blood-glucose-meter

 

A point to note.  While the ReliOn Prime "failed" their test, so too did the only meter and strips my insurance company will cover, the OneTouch Verio.

 

A bit of personal experience, my particular meter is pretty stable in its readings.  If, for some reason I retake my reading, it will normally be within a few points of the first reading.  I personally prize stability over accuracy.  For example, I suspect my meter reads a little high, but it does so consistently.  So I just adjust my expectations regarding my readings.  Well ok, I admit I did not adjust my expectations, mostly because I like the results it gives me.  :D  However if I was getting a wide range of values on retakes, especially with the same drop of blood, then that is more difficult to adjust for.

 

If you look in the meter manual when you get it, you will see instructions about the control solution.  I believe that the solution is set for a certain level and the meter is considered good if it lands within a certain range.  I don't remember the range off hand, but I remember it being pretty large.  But then that was about 5 years ago so my memory is pretty fuzzy. 

 

Edited by teamzr1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
meyery2k

We actually have it a lot easier now.  Home testing of blood was not as easy.  My grandfather had to test his urine and try to read the color of the strip.  Glucose does not generally show up in urine until it is over 150, if I remember correctly.  The A1C was also not widely in use until the 1980's or so.

 

I am also a technician and, while I don't like the fact the meters are not accurate, I appreciate that I at least have tools that I can use to look for trends.  I use the A1c as my base and would like to see it below 5.5.  I use my daily fasting readings to watch for trends.  As long as I test in the 80's or 90's consistently then I am doing OK.

 

I tested a lot at first as I learned how different meals affected me.  I now usually only test in the morning and on the random occasions just to see how the railroad is running.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
teamzr1
2 hours ago, meyery2k said:

 

I looked at the specs of the Contour Next the the results specs are not great

doing 7 tests means maybe better number but I would think if they did valid test counts the % would be worse

Crappy testcases and when I managed large testlabs such as with General Motors I would have fired the tech

I would have the feds when any medical tool must use like Military Spec components %5  and not general parts of 20 %

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Quote

We actually have it a lot easier now.  Home testing of blood was not as easy.  My grandfather had to test his urine and try to read the color of the strip.  Glucose does not generally show up in urine until it is over 150, if I remember correctly.  The A1C was also not widely in use until the 1980's or so.

 

I am also a technician and, while I don't like the fact the meters are not accurate, I appreciate that I at least have tools that I can use to look for trends.  I use the A1c as my base and would like to see it below 5.5.  I use my daily fasting readings to watch for trends.  As long as I test in the 80's or 90's consistently then I am doing OK.

 

I tested a lot at first as I learned how different meals affected me.  I now usually only test in the morning and on the random occasions just to see how the railroad is running.

 

Specs.jpg

Edited by teamzr1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
adiantum

Dont forget You tube is a pretty decent learning site. This is on how to use the test kit  but there are others available .

That brain fog you mentioned earlier will  soon become a thing of the past when your blood glucose is reduced.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.