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MJB

If you found out you don't tolerate Metformin.....

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dowling gram

I was put on Metforman when I was first diagnosed. That lasted for 3 days of he---ll. I went back to my doctor and he wrote me a prescription for Januvia and I've been on it for over 5 years. I've had absolutely no problem with it. It works by stimulating the Pancreas Beta cells to produce more insulin

 

I might have tried the slow release Metforman but it was not approved in Canada at the time. Most say there are fewer gastric problems with it.

 

My sister was on Invokana but had to get off of it because of recurring UI infections. With Invokana excess sugar is excreted with your urine. That excess sugar is what causes UI infections

 

There are other meds. Janumet is a combination of Januvia and Metforman and may be good too. There are others but those are the ones I know about. I suggest that if your doctor puts you on another diabetes med. you look it up and see how it works and possible side effects before you start on it

Edited by dowling gram

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MJB

I just got back from my doc. He prescribed Januvia but I just found out it will cost me $450/month.

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PJ Lin

You may try insulin injection...Don't laugh, I am serious.

In some studies, scientists have found early insulin injection may reverse diabetes symptoms.

An interesting article to read: https://www.biopleo.com/blogs/news/how-early-insulin-injection-could-halt-diabetes-progression

See the study: https://www.medscape.org/viewarticle/588165

and I quote: "The Lancet suggested that early intensive insulin therapy (insulin pump or multiple daily injections) for 3-5 weeks at the onset of type 2 DM led to clinical remission and arrested beta-cell function decline.[3] "

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MJB

I was diagnosed in 2006 so it appears that the early insulin injection ship has sailed.

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dowling gram
17 hours ago, PJ Lin said:

You may try insulin injection...Don't laugh, I am serious.

In some studies, scientists have found early insulin injection may reverse diabetes symptoms.

An interesting article to read: https://www.biopleo.com/blogs/news/how-early-insulin-injection-could-halt-diabetes-progression

See the study: https://www.medscape.org/viewarticle/588165

and I quote: "The Lancet suggested that early intensive insulin therapy (insulin pump or multiple daily injections) for 3-5 weeks at the onset of type 2 DM led to clinical remission and arrested beta-cell function decline.[3] "

Why don't you quit with this. Everyone here has been diabetic for a while or years so your suggestion even if it's true is of no use to us. Besides it is not recognized by the medical community and no one is giving this treatment so your info is useless. This is just a theory and a dangerous one at that

Edited by dowling gram

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meyery2k

@PJ Lin - While we appreciate ideas and reasoned debate, the intent of this forum is to help people that have been recently diagnosed with diabetes.  Generally the doctor tells you you are diabetic, pats you on the back, and sends you on the way with a prescription of Metformin.  I came here because I believed people that live with diabetes would give me the best advice on what I could do.

 

Frankly, recommending someone to try insulin injections with no knowledge of how to use insulin may kill them.  Insulin can be obtained without a prescription and ignorance of how it works can be fatal.

 

While I understand that the person you have replied to may have this knowledge, a person newly diagnosed that is scared, angry, and depressed might give this a go.

 

If I may suggest a more helpful approach, perhaps you could post upon the things you do to keep your condition in check.  That is what people come here for.  If you wish to discuss articles and other ideas, please post those in the articles forum where it is understood that the posts are theoretical.

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PJ Lin
43 minutes ago, meyery2k said:

@PJ Lin - While we appreciate ideas and reasoned debate, the intent of this forum is to help people that have been recently diagnosed with diabetes.  Generally the doctor tells you you are diabetic, pats you on the back, and sends you on the way with a prescription of Metformin.  I came here because I believed people that live with diabetes would give me the best advice on what I could do.

 

Frankly, recommending someone to try insulin injections with no knowledge of how to use insulin may kill them.  Insulin can be obtained without a prescription and ignorance of how it works can be fatal.

 

While I understand that the person you have replied to may have this knowledge, a person newly diagnosed that is scared, angry, and depressed might give this a go.

 

If I may suggest a more helpful approach, perhaps you could post upon the things you do to keep your condition in check.  That is what people come here for.  If you wish to discuss articles and other ideas, please post those in the articles forum where it is understood that the posts are theoretical.

got it. Thank you.

Just tried to help but did not see your points. Thank you.

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dowling gram

Thank you Mike! You stated so nicely and eloquently a point I was trying to make in my bumbling way. I would hate any newbie to get hurt trying PJ Lin's theory. Put in the right forum they can understand it is a theory and a study and not a proven fact

Edited by dowling gram

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Hammer

MJB, I could not tolerate ANY of the oral diabetes medications...they all gave me severe diarrhea, and I tried all of the classes of them....metformin, metformin ER, Starlix, amaryl, glipizide, glymeride, prandin, you name it, and I tried it.  I decided to just stop taking them because I didn't need to have severe diarrhea all of the time.  Also, except for metformin, all of the other oral drugs cause your pancreas to produce more insulin, which will overwork your already taxed pancreas, and that will eventually wear out your pancreas.

 

I decided to go with using insulin, since it doesn't go through my stomach, and thereby, won't cause me to have diarrhea.  I also figured that what my body needed was insulin, since that's what my pancreas produces, but not in sufficient quantities to overcome my insulin resistance.  Using insulin would also help to preserve some of of pancreas's insulin production.  Of course, when you use insulin, you have to be careful about how to dose it, but it isn't that difficult to learn what your body's insulin to carb (I:C) ratio is.  Once you've determined what that ratio is, you can then use insulin to get really precise control of your glucose levels....and insulin is more immediate than oral medications.  If your on oral medications and you eat something that has more carbs in it than you would normally eat, your glucose levels can rise up higher than you want them to be, and it might take a day or more before those BG levels drop back down to where you want them to be.  With insulin, you count the carbs in the food you are about to eat, then take the appropriate amount of insulin for that many carbs.  If you calculated correctly, your glucose levels wouldn't rise that much, but if you miscalculated and they did rise too high, you just take a second, corrective shot of insulin, and your BG levels will drop back down in a few hours.  The key here, is to know how much insulin to take, because if you take too much, your glucose levels will drop too low, and that can be dangerous.

 

I take both a basal insulin (Lantus), and a bolus insulin (Novolog).  The basal insulin, Lantus, is used to lower my fasting glucose levels.  Your fasting glucose levels are your glucose levels when you haven't eaten for a number of hours, and they are your baseline or basal levels.  Lantus has no effect on your after meal glucose spikes, that's what the Novolog is for.  You inject Novolog before you eat, to help keep your after meal spikes from spiking too high.  Using both types of insulin helps me keep good control of my glucose levels, and they don't upset my stomach.

 

Keep in mind that there are other types of insulin, older types that aren't as fast acting as the newer types, but are a lot less expensive.  I have no experience with them, so I can't comment on them. The newer types, Lantus and Levemir are the two main basal insulins, and Novolog and Humalog are the two main types of fast acting insulin, although there are some newer insulins that are just as good as these insulins...Tresiba is one... and supposedly work just as well, but I've never tried them.

 

Oh. and if you are wondering about the pain that using a needle to inject insulin causes, well, there is very little to no pain when you inject.  The reason is that, unlike the needles they use at the hospital to draw your blood for blood tests, insulin needles are very thin...so thin that most of the time when I inject, I don't even feel it.(you'd think that you'd at least feel something touching your skin, but you don't).  Those needles at the hospital that they use to draw your blood, are a lot thicker, because you blood cells are large, and they need to use a thicker needle to prevent damaging the blood cells when they draw blood.  Those finger pricks that you do when you do a glucose test to check your glucose levels, hurt more than the insulin injections do.

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dowling gram
14 hours ago, Hammer said:

MJB, I could not tolerate ANY of the oral diabetes medications...they all gave me severe diarrhea, and I tried all of the classes of them....metformin, metformin ER, Starlix, amaryl, glipizide, glymeride, prandin, you name it, and I tried it.  I decided to just stop taking them because I didn't need to have severe diarrhea all of the time.  Also, except for metformin, all of the other oral drugs cause your pancreas to produce more insulin, which will overwork your already taxed pancreas, and that will eventually wear out your pancreas.

 

I decided to go with using insulin, since it doesn't go through my stomach, and thereby, won't cause me to have diarrhea.  I also figured that what my body needed was insulin, since that's what my pancreas produces, but not in sufficient quantities to overcome my insulin resistance.  Using insulin would also help to preserve some of of pancreas's insulin production.  Of course, when you use insulin, you have to be careful about how to dose it, but it isn't that difficult to learn what your body's insulin to carb (I:C) ratio is.  Once you've determined what that ratio is, you can then use insulin to get really precise control of your glucose levels....and insulin is more immediate than oral medications.  If your on oral medications and you eat something that has more carbs . in it than you would normally eat, your glucose levels can rise up higher than you want them to be, and it might take a day or more before those BG levels drop back down to where you want them to be.  With insulin, you count the carbs in the food you are about to eat, then take the appropriate amount of insulin for that many carbs.  If you calculated correctly, your glucose levels wouldn't rise that much, but if you miscalculated and they did rise too high, you just take a second, corrective shot of insulin, and your BG levels will drop back down in a few hours.  The key here, is to know how much insulin to take, because if you take too much, your glucose levels will drop too low, and that can be dangerous.

 

I take both a basal insulin (Lantus), and a bolus insulin (Novolog).  The basal insulin, Lantus, is used to lower my fasting glucose levels.  Your fasting glucose levels are your glucose levels when you haven't eaten for a number of hours, and they are your baseline or basal levels.  Lantus has no effect on your after meal glucose spikes, that's what the Novolog is for.  You inject Novolog before you eat, to help keep your after meal spikes from spiking too high.  Using both types of insulin helps me keep good control of my glucose levels, and they don't upset my stomach.

 

Keep in mind that there are other types of insulin, older types that aren't as fast acting as the newer types, but are a lot less expensive.  I have no experience with them, so I can't comment on them. The newer types, Lantus and Levemir are the two main basal insulins, and Novolog and Humalog are the two main types of fast acting insulin, although there are some newer insulins that are just as good as these insulins...Tresiba is one... and supposedly work just as well, but I've never tried them.

 

Oh. and if you are wondering about the pain that using a needle to inject insulin causes, well, there is very little to no pain when you inject.  The reason is that, unlike the needles they use at the hospital to draw your blood for blood tests, insulin needles are very thin...so thin that most of the time when I inject, I don't even feel it.(you'd think that you'd at least feel something touching your skin, but you don't).  Those needles at the hospital that they use to draw your blood, are a lot thicker, because you blood cells are large, and they need to use a thicker needle to prevent damaging the blood cells when they draw blood.  Those finger pricks that you do when you do a glucose test to check your glucose levels, hurt more than the insulin injections do.

If that works for you or anyone else then fine but I'd rather take a pill a day than have to have injections through-out the day. If my pancreas wears out and my numbers go higher then I'll think about insulin. Right now I barely count carbs and barely test because I know what raises my BG. All I have to do is have an A1C every 6 months and pop a pill with my breakfast.

For reference-- I do test a few times a week and am always with-in my preferred range. My A1C has never been over 6 since 3 months after diagnosis over 5 years ago.

Edited by dowling gram

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Hammer

I agree with you Dowling, whatever works best for each person is what they should do.  I know that injecting insulin isn't what most of us want to do, and insulin isn't the answer for a lot of us.  It was just that MJB, like myself, can't tolerate oral diabetes meds due to the stomach distress, so the only solution for people like us is insulin.  One of my other concerns with oral meds, except for metformin, is that they will over work your pancreas which will eventually wear it out.  At that point, insulin would be necessary in order to control one's BG levels.  As my previous doctor pointed out, when you develop type 2 diabetes, you already have impaired pancreatic function, so your pancreas is already producing less than optimal insulin, so taking medications that continue to push your pancreas to produce even more insulin will wear it out even more.    Had that person started on insulin sooner, it would have preserved more of their pancreatic function, so that they wouldn't need to inject as much insulin.  Saving as much pancreatic function as you can, also gives you better control of your BG levels, because, if you eat something, and you under estimate the carbs in the food, which means that you'd inject too little insulin, your pancreas will help to make up the difference so that you don't spike too high.  If your pancreas is too worn out, it can't help you much if you inject too little insulin. 

 

But again, like you said, what works best for me, might not work best for someone else, since each of us have our own unique situations.☺️

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