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Jehartley

Advice/Sudden Change

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Jehartley

Hello!

 

I am a 46-year-old male with type 2 diabetes. Diagnosed two years ago. I am not overweight, I exercise 20 minutes daily, and I eat very well (meats, vegetables, nuts, eggs, water, and coffee).

 

I take metformin and glimepiride. My sugar stays in the range of 85-140, and while it might go up after meals, usually comes back down to that range. Unfortunately, I usually have a 155-165 range in the morning upon waking. A1c has been 6.0 to 6.2 consistently.

 

Three days ago, my blood sugar started to stay around 150 to 180 consistently throughout the day. No changes have been made to food, exercise, or medications. Now, I can’t seem to get it below 155 for going on several days and it stays around 170 mostly.

 

Does this mean my medication has begun to weaken? Would it happen that suddenly? Any advice would be appreciated.

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dowling gram

Hi Jehartley and welcome to the forum

 

No it dioesn't mean your medication is getting weaker,it means you are becoming more insulin resistant.

 

If you want your blood glucose lower you have to change your diet. While your diet is probably good for someone who doesn't have diabetes it probably isn't good for you. Diet is the  most essential way to control blood glucose. Don't consider it a diet at all but a lifestyle change. Carbohydrates are the culprit and you can live well and eat good and still cut out a lot of carbs. If you need help to get started look at the Keto diet. You will have to learn to read labels and learn to look up the nutrition of things to see how many carbs are in things. It's a delicate balance to find a diet that works for you and is one you can live with for a lifetime.

 

Use your meter to find out what food raises your blood glucose. At first that means a lot of testing. Test before you eat to get a baseline and at 2 hours when it should be back close to your baseline. We call it eating to your meter. Once you know the food to avoid or cut down on you won't have to test as often. After a while this way of eating will become second nature to you. I've tasted things I loved before diabetes after a long absence and the change in my diet and wondered why I thought they were so great.

 

Check back often and do some reading on this site. Ask any questions you may have. Someone is sure to answer.

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Jehartley

Thank you for the feedback. The problem isn't what raises my blood sugar...I have been figuring that out over the last two years and have managed it well. The problem is my blood sugar in between meals staying at around 170. If you look at what I posted that I eat, it pretty much is the veto diet. 

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meyery2k

@Jehartley - Illness or stress can cause you glucose to come up and make it difficult to control for the short term.  It is possible you are fighting something off and not experiencing noticeable symptoms.

 

Also corticosteroids can cause elevated glucose.  Sometimes we take them to help with inflammation and whammo!  Prednisone, hydrocortisone.  Any recent changes to medication?

 

I understand you have a handle on diet and that is great.  You might, however, find it helpful to share some meal data with us.  This helped me a lot when I first visited here after finding out I was type 2 and learning to figure things out.  Even now, a little over 3 years in, I learn something new on occasion.

 

https://www.webmd.com/diabetes/medicines-blood-sugar-spike

 

Welcome and hope to see you stick around! ~ Mike

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Kit

Hi @Jehartley, welcome to the group.

 

Things other than diet can have an affect on our numbers.  Has anything changed recently?  Something added or something removed?  Illness can have an affect.  I caught a bug a couple years back and jumped my morning numbers  from below 100 to the 140-160 range.  I can't say what it did the rest of the time because I spent most of it in bed and not eating so I didn't even bother testing.  :)  Medication can also have an affect on our BG numbers.  I recently discovered a medication often used for nerve issues and pain can have a negative affect on our numbers.  And its often prescribed for diabetic neuropathy.  Go figure.

 

If you weren't a guy, I'd mention the possibility of perimenopause.  I have discovered after the last handful of years just how much hormone fluctuations can affect our numbers as well.

 

Anyway, welcome.  I hope you stick around.  Keep us updated on how things are going.

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Jehartley

Thank you all for the great feedback. I appreciate it. A couple of you have asked for a daily routine. I wake at 5:00 am everyday and ride the exercise back for 20 minutes. I then eat a couple of eggs (a little chili powder on top of them), a small dab of guacamole, and three pieces of turkey bacon with two cups of black coffee. For lunch I have a serving of tuna with some lemon and dill sprinkled on top. Around 3:00, I have a handful of almonds or some beef jerk, then for dinner, I usually have a meat (chicken, steak, or fish) and two vegetables (mostly broccoli and Brussel sprouts). I drink water throughout the day.

 

Nothing has changed recently at all. That is why this is perplexing me. 

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adiantum

Welcome @Jehartley, I am impressed with your exercise & diet regime so can understand your frustration on these  new numbers.

 

I wonder if you are really type2  or perhaps 1.5 LADA.

 

You could discuss it with your doctor & ask for blood tests to check for C-peptide levels to determine how much insulin your body is making & for antibodies 

 

 

 

 

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dowling gram

Lee may be on to something here. Some people thought they were type 2 only to find out later that they were in fact a type 1.5 which is  late onset type 1. That is why she suggested you be tested for it.

 

Those that did find out couldn't control their blood glucose like a type 2 with meds. and diet. It's worth a try so you can get to the bottom of what's happening to you

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Hammer

It's possible that your insulin resistance has increased, or that your pancreas might not be producing as much insulin as it did before.  In either case, your doctor may have to increase your meds.  If increasing your meds still doesn't bring your numbers down, then like Lee mentioned, you might be becoming a type 1.5, meaning that you might need to start using insulin.  Don't be concerned if you find out that you are a type 1.5, and that you need to start using insulin.  That doesn't mean that you are losing the battle with your diabetes, it just means that you need to change things up to compensate for your rising glucose levels.  I'm a type 2 and I use two different insulins, and my glucose levels are well under control.

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