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violetrose

new diagnosis of prediabetes

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violetrose

Hi, at my annual physical on 5/31 the doctor told me my HgA1c was 5.8 and that is prediabetes.  She said my glucose of 106 was elevated (she thought it was a fasting glucose - but actually it was not as I ate something, I didn't know they were doing all of my lab work that day).  She said to eat carbs in moderation, drink more water, and come back in a year.  I am not overweight.  My father had type 2 DM with cardiovascular disease.  My normal diet was high in carbs but I thought was a healthy diet, not many sweets, mostly fish and lean meat, vegetables and fruits, grains.  I am sure I was eating too large portion sizes especially at restaurants.  Doctor did not tell me to test blood sugar but I have been using a friend's glucose monitor and I have been getting fasting blood sugars in the 120s-140s.  A few times tested several hours after meals and got 124, 140 something, 152.  After the diagnosis I immediately changed my diet and cut down on calories and carbs and portion sizes.   No sweets, no potatoes, no white pasta, no white rice, much less fruit, no wine, don't eat late at night which I wasn't doing before anyway except for a snack.  I use an app and am aiming for about 40% carbs (before I estimate I was eating at least 60% carbs).  An ultra low carb diet would be very hard for me.  I do not like milk, yogurt, cheese, eggs (except the whites, hard boiled), not a big meat eater.  Also don't like butter, mayonnaise.  I am trying to increase activity.  Also trying to drink more fluids.  I get stressed out every time I take my blood sugar and it's elevated.  Today for example I had a fasting blood sugar of 134 after 13 hours of not eating or drinking.  I ate 1/2 cup oatmeal with 1/4 cup almonds and cinnamon and a hard boiled egg white and tested 2 hours later and got 152.  I did call the doctor's office about the blood sugar levels I have gotten at home and they said to repeat testing in 6 months.  How often and when should I test?  - I don't have my own monitor and the test strips are expensive and I understand probably not going to be covered by insurance for prediabetes.   

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OneEye

Walmart makes a very affordable meter/test strips.

 

As an addendum...you say you're "pre-diabetes". Your comment information says that you're Type 1. You should change that so when people reply to you they don't think their answers apply to a Type 1.

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Kit

Hi @violetrose, welcome to the group.

 

My biggest recommendation would be to go to Walmart (in store or online) and pickup a ReliOn Prime meter.  The meter is about $18, the strips are $9 for 50, which is cheaper than my insurance copay for the meter I was assigned by my insurance company.

 

Testing recommendation.  Test before your first bite and 2 hours after your first bite.  It will tell you how YOUR body reacts to the foods you choose to eat.  If something raises you higher than your target goals, make some adjustments and try it again.

 

How often should you test?  At first, quite often.  My recommendation would be before and after every meal.  It doesn't have to go on forever like this, but while you are learning and getting things under control, this is a good place to start.

 

So now we are down to target goals.

 

Fasting and before meals - under 120

1 hour after meal - under 140

2 hours after a meal - under 120

 

As I was getting my numbers down, I also came up with the 20 point rule.  My thoughts were that if my pre meal number was 99 (acceptable) and I wanted to remain under 120 2 hours later, I couldn't have a rise of over 20 points at 2 hours.  So, a safe meal won't take me over 100 if I was 80 before a meal.

 

Anyway, good luck.  Let us know how things are going.  Feel free to ask any questions you might have.  There's a lot of first hand experience here.

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meyery2k

@violetrose - Welcome and it is great to see you take this seriously.  If you act now, you have a chance to avoid a diagnosis of diabetes which comlicates matters like getting life insurance among other things.

 

Many here, myself included, would consider pre-diabetes as diabetes.  You just fall under the threshold of what is considered diabetes but you, like the rest of us T2s, do not have normal insulin/glucose responses.

 

The best way to get things in hand is to start a log, use an app, whatever and log your glucose as follows.  Walmart has an inexpensive meter, the Relion Prime.  The strips are among the least expensive you will find.  Approximately $20 per 100.  

 

Test and log your fasting BG and record it.

Test before eating something, record it, then test about 2 hours after.  Your BG should be about where you started.  If it remains elevated, then you would need to adjust the meal you ate.  Perhaps a smaller portion or substituting with something else.  We call this eating to your meter and it is a crucial step when learning to get a handle on things.

 

Sadly, oatmeal spikes many of us.  Grains are simple carbohydrates which are converted most easily to glucose.

 

You might find that, whatever you do, your fasting reading is higher than reading through the day.  This is because your liver will release glucose into your bloodstream to give you the energy to wake up.  Some, in spite of low carb eating and exercise, never quite eliminate that.  If you can manage to keep glucose table throughout the day and not spike that is probably better for you in the long term.

 

Adjusting to a lower carbohydrate diet can be a little challenging but, once the habits are adopted, it is not difficult at all.

 

I know some of these items are on the "don't like" list but meat, cheese, eggs, cream, NON-ROOT vegetables, nuts, are your friends.  Some berries like strawberries, raspberries, and blackberries might work in small quantities.

 

There are great keto based recipes that can help with variety.  I have found that I eat much better now than ever before.

 

Another good goal to help start might be to try and limit your carbohydrate intake to 100g per day.  Once you are comfortable with that, lower gradually.  Many hear strive for under 50 as they find it gives them the best results.  It appears difficult and, yes, some out of the box thinking needs to be done but it is not as difficult as it appears.

 

Alcohol - Again, test to your meter.  Dry wines, low carb beer, and spirits do not have many carbs (distilled spirits have 0).  Alcohol also inhibits your liver from dumping glucose and some (myself included) have a night cap and find it does not elevate glucose.

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stevenal

violetrose

Welcome. You speak of avoiding white rice and pasta, but if you look at the glycemic indices on brown rice and whole wheat pasta, you'll not see much difference. Suggest riced cauliflower and spiralized zucchini (zoodles) instead. Instead of oatmeal, try ground flax, hemp hearts, and/or chia. There are a few fats left off your don't like list, such as extra virgin olive and coconut oil you might wish to add or increase. Fat is good stuff for us insulin resistant folks, since it won't raise blood glucose while providing energy and satiety.

 

FPG of 134 is diabetes according to the ADA: http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/diagnosis/. Sorry to be bringing bad news, but perhaps you can get your supplies covered. I found that once I knew how food affected me, I could back way off on the testing.

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violetrose

Thanks everyone for the advice.  I noticed my profile said type I and I corrected it.   I took my blood sugar again 2-1/2 hours after lunch and it was 152 again.   I do like peanut butter, nuts, olive oil, fish, occasional chicken and turkey.  Not cheese, eggs except hard boiled eggs whites, dairy products.  If I can't have even small portions of grains and fruit that is going to be hard but if I have to..   

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adiantum

Welcome @violetrose,you will have a great future without health complications  if you keep up with that great determination.

You can quickly  come to terms in reducing fruit intake although I keep a bag of frozen strawberries & blueberries in the freezer & use them to flavour 1minute muffins. View our recipe section as theres great ideas there.

I dont understand this bit...  why not eat the whole egg? eggs are a wonderful food & in Summer I keep a couple hard boiled eggs in the fridge for snacks.

"not cheese,...dairy products.." Is that because you dont like them or cant  tolerate them? I eat very little dairy products but thats for ethical reasons .

Whilst milk is high carb, cream,butter & cheese are good food choices.

1 hour ago, violetrose said:

Not cheese, eggs except hard boiled eggs whites, dairy products.  

 

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Kit
1 hour ago, violetrose said:

If I can't have even small portions of grains and fruit that is going to be hard but if I have to..   

 

I also adored fruits and grains, but I had to decide which I preferred.  Fruits and grains or my eyes, feet, kidneys, and similar.  I watched my brother die a really horrible death from diabetes complications.  I really don't want that to happen to me.  Going blind sucks.  Being on dialysis sucks even more.  The difficulty of being on a diabetic and renal diet at the same time is next to impossible it seems.  Loosing your feet and legs, agonizing.    My brother went septic and started hallucinating.  

 

Remember the concept of eating to your meter.  Try different foods and test how they affect you.  If your numbers are good, then you might be able to tolerate them.

 

Some people here have good luck with sprouted grain breads.  I think I remember people mentioning Trader Joe's.    Some also report decent responses with the various low carb tortillas out there.

 

I'll also add avocado oil as another to look at using.  I make use of it quite frequently when I stir fry veggies or similar.

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meyery2k

My observation is that there must be many causes or reasons for a person to become Type 2.  I know some people can't eat potatoes at all.  I can eat a small portion and be OK.  Rice of any type (and products made from rice) will send me over 140 in no time at all.  One of my worst readings ever was 170 after eating pho which has rice noodles in the broth. 

 

Eat to your meter and you will learn how you work.  From there, it is a matter of adaptation.

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steel

i haven't read all the responses since i am heading out in a bit...def eat to your meter. i personally eat 20-30 total carbs/day. most of my macros come from fat and protein in that order. i haven't been t2d very long but have maintained an a1c of 5.0 for almost a year on this diet. it's great that you're starting to test. blood sugar 101 by jenny ruhl and dr. bernstein's diabetes solution are great resources.

 

i was diagnosed with pre-d a couple of years ago. i wish i had done the testing frequently and gone low carb (i was mod carb 50-60 grams of carbs but clearly that wasn't enough for me personally) which might have slowed the progression to full blown t2d. then again, pre-d is diabetes and also an early stage of diabetes where you can make a real difference (much like us full blown t2s who maintain non diabetic Hba1c levels ..some of us have for years) through diet and exercise. diet is most of what it takes to get those numbers down.

 

and yeah there are many causes for t2d. it's really more a disease of beta cell dysfunction, not just insulin resistance.

okay i read the op again. those fasting numbers are definitely in the full t2d range 120-140-- yeah a1c is just an average. so you're on the right track with testing frequently and low carbing.

 

my personal targets were 120 1 hr post meals. 100-110 2 hours post meals.  since adding a med (affects bg) for another health issue , my pp numbers don't drop in two hours but more like 3. but i don't go above 125 or so 1 hr post meals and after 3 hours i like being at 100 (or below). my fasting goal is 100 and below. my fasting is now a little higher at times (108 max). but overall i am doing okay. my last a1c was 5.0.

 

Those targets aren't reached immediately though. I started with a target of 140 2 hours post meals and then tightened the control from there. :)

 

all the best. this forum and members here has been indispensable in success with t2d management. we're here for you.

 



 

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Hammer

Hi Violetrose and welcome to the forums.

 

The others have given you excellent advice.  There really is no such thing as pre-diabetes....that's like saying that a woman is a little bit pregnant.  Doctors tell you that you are pre-diabetic, but all that means is that the person is controlling their diabetes with diet and exercise.  A non-diabetic person will never have an after meal reading of 140.  In my experiences, and from what I've read here in the forums, a typical non-diabetic can eat whatever they want, and will rarely go over 110.

 

When you switch to a diabetic friendly diet, you don't go by percentages....like you said, you cut back to eating 40% carbs, instead, you need to count the carbs you eat and try to stay under a certain number of carbs.(I try to stay under 50 carbs a day.)  Keep in mind that carbs are addictive...the more you eat, the more you crave.  Something that was mentioned in the forums....if you switch to eating a low carb diet, you'll miss those higher carb foods at first, but the longer you stay on a low carb diet, your tastes will change and you'll find that the lower carb foods actually taste better than the higher carb foods did.

 

As the others have said, go to Wal-Mart and get a Relion Prime meter (they have several Relion meters there, so get the one that's about $18, and before you buy it, check to see which test strips it uses, then check out the prices of the test strips....get the strips that are $9 for 50.  The other strips for the other meters are a little more expensive.)  Once you have a meter, like was mentioned, test before you eat, then two hours after you've eaten to see what the food you ate did to your BG levels.  If your after meal readings are a lot higher than your before meal readings, then you need to avoid those foods, or reduce their portion sizes.  After you've done this for a while, you'll find that you won't need to test as often, since you'll know what a lot of the foods will do to your BG levels.

 

As for the foods, most fruits are bad for you, but by using your meter, you can find out what each fruit does to your BG levels.  For example, you might eat an apple, but by testing, you find that an apple raises your glucose levels too high.  The next time you want to eat an apple, you cut it in half and just eat half an apple, but when you test after you've eaten it, you find that your glucose levels are still too high.  The next time you want to eat an apple, you cut it into quarters and just eat one quarter of the apple.  You test two hours later and find that your glucose levels didn't rise very much.  Now you know that you can eat one quarter of an apple, with just a little rise in your BG levels.

 

Like was mentioned, good fats are good for you....use olive oil liberally, eat the skin on chicken, the fat on beef, use real butter, avocados are good for you, use heavy cream in your tea or coffee, eggs are good, etc.  I know that you don't like some of these foods, so you can maybe find some substitutes for them in our recipe section.  The reason that we say eat good fats is because fats make you feel full.  Almost all of those fad diets and doctor prescribed diets will fail, and they will fail because they tell you to lower your caloric intake and your fat intake.  That will never work, because if you lower your caloric intake, you are going to be hungry all of the time, so you need to fill that hunger with something, and that something is the good fat.  A person who goes on a diet and is hungry all of the time, will eventually get tired of being hungry all of the time, and will eventually go off of the diet.  Those fats to avoid...anything with transfatty acids, poly-unsaturated fats, and anything with partially hydrogenated vegetable oil.  Avoid starchy vegetables like potatoes, corn and peas, as well as most types of beans....oh, and you mentioned peanut butter, that's got sugar in it, so it has lots of carbs.

 

Anyway, if you have any questions, well, that's what this forum is for, so feel free to ask as many questions as you want.☺️

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stevenal

There's no problem with fruit as long as it's avocado. Otherwise I stick with a few berries on my morning flax.

Skippy and Jiff are full of added sugar, but there are peanut butters that aren't.  None are carb free, but your meter can tell you how they affect you.  I buy Adams crunchy natural pb at Costco. It's a good idea to read those labels and to learn their limitations.

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